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REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



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WAR DEPARTMENT, 
OFFICE DIRECTOR CENSUS OE PORTO RICO. 



REPORT 



ON THE 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 



18 9 9. 



LT. COL J. P. SANGER, Inspector-General, 

DIRECTOR. 

HENRY GANNETT, WALTER E. WILLCOX, 

STATISTICAL EXPERTS. 



WASHINGTON: 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 

1900. 



1765899 

TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Letter of transmittal of the Director of the Census to the Secretary of War 9 

Organization of the Census 9 

The field work 9 

Geography 11 

Orography 11 

Political divisions 11 

Climate 12 

Minerals, flora, and fauna 13 

History 13 

Discovery 13 

Settlement 14 

Indian uprisings and foreign invasions 14 

Slow development of island 15 

Intervention hy the United States 15 

Revenues and expenditures 17 

Economic condition 17 

Government 18 

Municipal, district, and departmental government 21 

The judiciary 22 

Aborigines 23 

Negroes 30 

Chinese 32 

Summary of past censuses 32 

Census of 1860 32 

Census of 1877 34 

Census of 1887 35 

Form of population schedules 36 

Method of tabulation 38 

Discussion of population tal >les 40 

Total population 40 

Urban population 43 

Center of population 44 

Sex 45 

Age 46 

Age and sex 53 

Race 55 

Race and sex 60 

Race and age 60 

Nativity 62 

Males of voting age 62 

Conjugal condition 65 

The single - - 66 

The married 68 

The widowed 71 

Education - 71 

History - 71 

Literacy 72 

3 



4 CONTENTS. 

Discussion of population tables — Continued. Page. 
Education — Continued. 

School attendance 75 

Classified by sex 77 

Classified by age 77 

Classified by race 78 

Literacy among persons over 10 years of age 78 

Statistics of educational institutions 83 

Occupations 86 

Breadwinners classified by sex 88 

Breadwinners classified by age 89 

Breadwinners classified by age and sex 90 

Breadwinners classified by race 92 

Breadwinners classified by race and sex 93 

Breadwinners classified as native and foreign born 94 

Breadwinners classified by groups of occupations 95 

Breadwinners classified by specified occupations 97 

Size of families 97 

Families of one member 99 

Families of eleven members - 100 

Families of two to ten members 101 

Sanitary condition of dwellings 102 

Dwellings and families 105 

Source of water supply 106 

In San Juan 108 

In Ponce 109 

In Mayaguez 109 

Disposition of garbage 109 

Disposition of excreta 110 

Vital statistics 112 

Deaths and death rates 112 

Births and birth rates 112 

Marriages and marriage rates 113 

Agriculture 118-141 

Coffee 118-129 

Report of Sefior Ricardo Hernandez 118-121 

Suitable climate 119 

Suitable soil - 119 

Methods of cultivation 120 

Methods of preparation 121 

Report of Sefior M. Badrena 125-129 

Sugar 129-141 

Report of Sefior Ricardo Hernandez 129-141 

Suitable climate - 130 

Suitable soil 130 

Time of sowing 131 

Reproduction 132 

Preparation of ground 133 

Spade planting 135 

Planting in holes or pits 135 

Planting on banks 136 

Replanting 137 

Weeding 138 

Hilling 138 



CONTENTS. 5 

Agriculture — Continued. 
Sugar — Continued . 

Report of Senor Ricardo Hernandez — Continued. Page. 

Trimming 13g 

Cutting the cane 139 

Cost of production 140 

Amount produced 141 

Tobacco 141 

Report of Senor Planella 141-144 

Methods of production 142 

Production 145 

Stock raising 146 

Roads, railroads, and agricultural implements 146 

Discussion of agricultural tables 147 

Farm schedule 148 

Size of farm 149 

Farm tenure, by race 150 

Farm products 152 

Coffee 153 

Sugar 154 

Sugar mills and distilleries 155 

TABLES. 

Table I. Total population, by departments 156 

II. Total population, by municipal districts 156 

III. Total population, by departments, districts, and wards 157 

IV. Total population, by cities 163 

V. Sex, general nativity, and color, by departments and districts.. 164 

VI. Percentages by sex, by departments and districts 168 

VII. Percentages by nativity and color, by departments and dis- 
tricts 170 

VIII. Age and sex, by department and districts 172 

IX. Age, sex, nativity, and race, by departments 174 

X. Nativity, by departments and districts 185 

XI. Nativity, sex, and race, by departments 187 

XII. Males 21 years of age and over, by birthplace, race, and literacy, 

by departments and districts 190 

XIII. Conjugal condition, by departments and districts 194 

XIV. Conjugal condition, race, sex, and nativity, by departments 196 

XV. Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity, by depart- 
ments 200 

XVI. Illegitimate children, with age, sex, race, and nativity, by 

departments 240 

XVII. School attendance, literacy, and superior education, by depart- 
ments and districts 243 

XVIII. Percentages 10 years of age and over, with age, sex, race, 

nativity, and literacy, by departments 245 

XIX. Superior education, with age, sex, race, and nativity, by depart- 
ments 265 

XX. School attendance, with sex and race, by departments 267 

XXI. Kind and capacity of educational institutions, by departments. 281 

XXII. Number of pupils, with color and sex, by departments 281 

XXIII. Grand groups of occupations, with sex, race, and nativity, by 

departments and districts 282 



6 CONTENTS. 

Page 
Table XXIV. Grand groups of occupations, with age, sex, race, and nativity, 

by departments 306 

XXV. Occupations, by departments 326 

XXVI. Occupations, with sex, race, and nativity, for the island 327 

XXVII. Occupations, with age and sex, for the island 328 

XXVIII. Occupations, with sex, literacy, and superior education, for the 

island 330 

XXIX. Occupations, with sex and conjugal condition, for the island.. 331 

XXX. Occupations, with sex and place of birth, for the island 333 

XXXI. Number and size of families, by departments and districts 335 

XXXII. Source of water supply, by departments and districts 339 

XXXIII. Disposition of garbage, by departments and districts 341 

XXXIV. Disposition of excreta, by departments and districts 343 

XXXV. Births from 1888 to 1898, by departments and districts 345 

XXXVI. Marriages from 1888 to 1898, by departments and districts 348 

XXXVII. Deaths from 1888 to 1898, by departments and districts 350 

XXXVIII. Farm areas, by departments and districts 352 

XXXIX. Tenure of farms, with size, and race of occupant; number of 

farms, by departments 354 

XL. Tenure of farms, with size, and race of occupant; cultivated 

area, by departments 355 

XLI. Areas cultivated in the principal crops, by departments 356 

XLII. Live stock, by departments 358 

APPENDICES. 

I. War Department orders organizing the census 361 

II. War Department order appointing disbursing officers 365 

III. List of enumerators and enumeration districts 365 

IV. Contract with the Tabulating Machine Co 381 

V. List of governors of Porto Rico 382 

VI. Bibliography 386 

VII. Statement of expenditures 387 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



MAPS. 

Page. 

Density of rural population 42 

Sex 46 

Native whites, proportion to total population 54 

Colored, proportion to total population _ 56 

Married, proportion to all living together 70 

Illiterates, proportion of population over 10 years of age. 78 

Cultivated land, proportion to total area 148 

Coffee land, proportion of all cultivated land 152 

Sugar land, proportion of all cultivated land 154 

DIAGRAMS. 

Total population, historical 40 

Age and sex 44 

Conjugal condition, sex, race, nativity, and occupations 50 

Conjugal condition by race, sex and age 66 

Size of families 100 

Agricultural products 156 

PHOTOGRAPHIC REPRODUCTIONS. 

Supervisors of the census Frontispiece. 

El Yunque, in the Sierra Luquillo 12 

Ruins of church at Pueblo Viejo 14 

Aguadilla: Monument erected at this place to Columbus, where he first landed 

November 19, 1493 16 

Types of Porto Ricans 28 

Native negroes 30 

Types of mestizos - 32 

Native huts 34 

Native huts in Catano 36 

Native hut 38 

Public school in Arecibo - ^2 

Public school in Manati ' ^ 

Public school in Mayaguez '6 

Coffee plantation in Mayaguez H° 

Coffee plantation in Adjuntas 120 

Coffee plantation in Lares - 122 

Clearing a cane field 130 

Clearing a cane field with harrow - 13- 

Sugar plantation in Arecibo ^°^ 



8 ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Page. 

Sugar mill and plantation in Manati (Injenio) 136 

Sugar mill in Manati 138 

Ruins of sugar mill destroyed by hurricane of August 8, 1899. Anasco 140 

Cocoanut farm in Mayaguez 142 

Gathering cocoanuts 144 

Agricultural implements 146 

Orange grove in Mayaguez _ _ . 146 

City of San Juan (south half ) 156 

City of San Juan (north half) 156 

City of Coamo 180 

City of Ponce (west half) 200 

City of Ponce (east half) 200 

City of Utuado 220 

Main street in Caguas 240 

City of Cayey 260 

City of Arecibo 280 

City of Guayama 320 

City of Aibonito £00 

City of Fajardo 340 

Plaza of Mayaguez 356 

Enumerators of Aguadilla 366 

Enumerators of Arecibo 368 

Enumerators of Cayey 370 

Enumerators of Humacao 372 

Supervisor and enumerators of Mayaguez 374 

Enumerators of Ponce 376 

Enumerators of San Juan 378 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



War Department, Porto Rican Census, 

Washington, November 7, 1900. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the following- report of the census 
of Porto Rico : 

The Executive order for taking- the census was issued September 8, 
1899 (Appendix I). An estimate of expenses was made on the basis 
of the probable population, and the execution of the field work by 
native Porto Ricans, on the lines followed in taking the census of Cuba, 
except that the supervisors were not brought to Washington. 

Mr. Harrison Dingman, an experienced officer of the United States 
census, was selected as Assistant Director to superintend the field work, 
and left Washington with his office force September 30. 

The division of the island into 917 enumeration districts and the 
appointment of the enumerators were finished November t>, and 
promptly on November 10 the enumeration was commenced. On 
December 20 it was completed, and on January 25, 1900, Mr. Dingman 
and party left Porto Rico for Washing-ton, arriving - January 30. 

The field work was carried on under great difficulties, owing- to the 
effects of the hurricane of August 8 and the prevalence of the rainy 
season, which made communication almost impossible in many parts 
of the rural districts. Nevertheless, the enumeration was rapidly and 
thoroughly done despite all obstacles, and Mr. Dingman, the super- 
visors, and their associates are to be congratulated on the thoroug-h 
accomplishment of the work. The same precautions were observed as 
in Cuba in determining literacy in doubtful cases, the persons enumer- 
ated being requested to read and write. In the latter part of December 
and early in January, the Director of the Census made a visit of inspec- 
tion to a majority of the departments. The Supervisors were found to 
be entirely qualified for their important duties and their offices in good 
running- order. As many enumerators as possible were questioned con- 
cerning the schedules, and gave unmistakable evidence of their intel- 
ligence and their anxiety to perform their duties honestly (Appendix 
III). Sixty-two women were appointed enumerators, and thus, for the 
first time in Porto Rico, as in the census of Cuba, women were given 
public employment. 



10 LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 

The tabulation was made by the Tabulating Machine Company under 
a contract executed Feb. 1, 1900 (Appendix V). Three census bulle- 
tins were issued, and in their preparation, as well as in the preparation 
of this report, I have had the valuable assistance of Mr. Henry Gannett, 
of the Geological Survey, and Mr. Walter F. Willcox, of the United 
States Census. 

As several voluminous reports have been published recently on the 
economic and social conditions prevailing in Porto Rico, notably those 
of Gen. George W. Davis, Military Governor, and Hon. Henry K. Car- 
roll, special commissioner for the United States to Porto Rico, and 
as other reports are in course of preparation, it has not been thought 
necessary to enter minutely into details concerning history, govern- 
ment, and education, all of which have been or soon will be elaborately 
presented. 

As a subject of great interest the methods employed by the Porto 
Ricans in the cultivation of their principal staples — coffee, sugar, and 
tobacco — are given, together with such views of the island as will 
explain its varied and beautiful characteristics. 
Very respectfully, 

J. P. Sanger, Ins. Genl., 
Director Censits of Porto Rico. 

Hon. Elihu Root, 

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C. 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO. 



GEOGRAPHY. 

Porto Rico, the easternmost and smallest of the Greater Antilles, is 
within the Tropics, between latitudes 17° 50' and 18° 30' north, and 
longitudes 65° 30' and 67° 15' west. It lies east of Haiti, being separated 
from it by Mona Passage. It is in shape rudely rectangular, its longest 
axis lying east and west. Its length is a trifle over 100 miles and its 
breadth about 36 miles. Its area is approximately 3,600 square miles, 
three-fourths the size of Connecticut and about the size of the province 
of Matanzas, Cuba. 

OROGRAPHY. 

The structure of the island is simple. Passing across it from east 
to west, a little south of the middle of its breadth, is a broken, irregu- 
lar range of hills or low mountains, which toward the eastern end 
trends northeastward, and terminates near the northeastern corner of 
the island, where it culminates in the peak of El Yunque, 3,609 feet 
in altitude. Elsewhere it ranges in altitude -from 2,000 to 3,000 
feet, with occasional summits slightly above 3,000 feet and gaps 
slightly below 2,000 feet. This range is known in different parts of 
the island by various names, Cordillera Central, Sierra de Cayey, and 
in the northeast Sierra de Luquilla. From its crest the land slopes 
northward and southward in broad undulations, deeply cut by streams, 
giving most of the interior of the island a steep, hilly surface, gradu- 
ally becoming more nearly level until near the coast it spreads into 
broad, level play as. This range forms the water divide of the island, 
and from it streams flow northward and southward, those flowing 
north having much the longer courses and gentler slopes. None of 
these streams are navigable, excepting for a very few miles near their 
mouths, where they are in effect estuaries. The largest are the 
Rios Loiza, Bayamon, Morovis, Arecibo, and Blanco, all on the north 
of the dividing ridge. On the south the dividing ridge descends 
steeply, with short spurs and a narrow coastal plain. Here the 
streams are short, with very steep descents. 

The coast is low and for the most part simple, with few good har- 
bors, the best being that of San Juan, on the north coast. Ponce 

11 



12 KEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO EICO, 1899. 

and Guanica are the only harbors on the south coast into which vessels 
of ordinary draft can enter, but the island of Vieques has several com- 
modious ports where the largest ships can ride at anchor. The coast 
of Porto Rico, unlike that of Cuba, is not bordered by fringing reefs 
or islets. 

Means of internal transportation are scanty. There are altogether 
about 159 miles of railway in the island, but they are in disconnected 
pieces and closely parallel the coast, none extending into the interior. 
Of wagon roads there are all sorts. The Spanish Government has con- 
structed about 285 miles of military road which is well built and kept 
in good repair. Of this sort is the road from San Juan to Ponce, 
with a branch from Cayey to Guayama. Most of the other roads of 
Porto Rico are almost impassable except for pack trains. 

Porto Rico is divided into seven departments, which correspond 
with the provinces of Cuba, and into 69 municipal districts. These 
in turn are divided into barrios, or wards, the plan of subdivision for 
governmental purposes being thus quite similar to that of Cuba. 

Besides the island of Porto Rico, the Government has jurisdiction 
over the islands of Vieques and Culebra, tying to the eastward, and 
Isla Mona to the west, in the Mona Passage, together with a few other 
islets in their neighborhood. 

Most of the area of Porto Rico is held as farms, and a large portion, 
more than one-fifth, is under cultivation. The forested areas are 
small and are almost entirely confined to the higher parts of the 
mountains. The largest of these tracts is on El Yunque, in the Sierra 
Luquilla. Here are found small tracts of primeval forest, composed 
of large trees of a Variety of species, several of which are of great 
value, such as Spanish cedar, ebony, and sandalwood, besides many 
others as yet unknown to American markets. Timber is, however, 
very scarce, and most of that used in building is imported. 

CLIMATE. 

Lying in the Tropics, the island is within the region of the southwest 
trades, which blow with great regularity. The annual temperature at 
San Juan, on the north coast, ranges in different years from 78° to 82° 
F. The mean monthly temperature ranges from 75° in January to 82° 
in August. The maximum temperature on record is 99°, and the mini- 
mum 57°, indicating a very slight range and a uniform climate. The 
only difference of temperature to be observed throughout the island is 
due to altitude, the highlands of the interior having a mean annual 
temperature as low as 72° F. Serious storms occur, and occasional 
earthquakes, but the latter are not violent, doing but little damage. 
The annual rainfall at San Juan averages 60 inches, about the same as 
at New Orleans, and nearly two-thirds of this falls in the summer and 




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GEOGRAPHY. 13 

autumn. The annual relative humidity at the capital is very high, 
averaging not far from 80 per cent. 

The annual rainfall increases eastward from San Juan, until near 
the northeast corner of the island it exceeds 100 inches. It increases 
also upon the highlands of the interior, reaching a maximum upon the 
dividing ridge of nearly 100 inches. The south slope of the island, on 
the other hand, is much drier, both rainfall and atmospheric moisture 
being less, so much so that in some regions irrigation is necessary for 
cultivation of crops. 

MINERALS, FLORA AND FAUNA. 

While many valuable minerals have been found in Porto Rico, and 
while good placers were long ago worked by Spaniards, no mining of 
any sort is at present carried on. Yet it is not at all improbable that 
a geological examination may develop valuable mineral resources not 
at present suspected. 

Owing to the fact that Porto Rico has for centuries maintained a 
dense population almost entirely supported by agriculture, a large 
portion of its surface is under cultivation, and only a trifling propor- 
tion remains in its natural condition. Hence little of its vegetation is 
indigenous. 

The native fauna of the island is, owing to the same cause, very 
limited. There are no large mammals except such as are domesticated. 
It is said that there are no noxious reptiles and few insect pests. 

The fisheries on the coast and in the rivers are very valuable, the 
fish being abundant everywhere and of valuable species. 

HISTORY. 

The history of Porto Rico presents but few points of interest as 
compared with Cuba or the other colonies of Spain in this hemisphere. 

The island was discovered by Columbus November 16, 1493, during 
his second voyage. He approached it from Santo Domingo and first 
sighted Cape Mala Pascua. From there he sailed along the south and 
east coast to Aguada, where he landed November 19. He took pos- 
session of the island in the name of the reigning sovereigns of Spain 
and named it San Juan Bautista, in honor of St. John the Baptist. 
Its Indian name was Borinquen. Columbus remained for several days 
and then returned to Santo Domingo. It does not appear that he ever 
visited the island again. 

During the next fourteen years numerous trading vessels stopped 
at the island, usually for water, but it remained unexplored and unin- 
habited by white men until 1508, when Nicolas de Ovando, Governor 
of Santo Domingo, having learned that the mountains and streams 
abounded in gold, sent Juan Ponce de Leon to explore the island. 
He embarked with a small party of Spaniards and a few Indian guides 



H REPOBT OB THE CENSUS OF POETO RICO, 1899. 

and landed mar Aguadilla. the home of the principal cacique, Aquey- 
bana, b} whom he was kindly received and conducted to different 
parts of the island. In the course of the journey Ponce de Leon veri- 
fied the reports of the Indians in regard to the presence of gold, and 
returned to Santo Domingo, leaving a few of his companions as guests 
of Aqiieybana. 

Ovando now determined to subjugate and colonize the island, and 
Ponce de Leon was selected to conduct the enterprise. Before organ- 
izing the expedition, however, Ponce de Leon resolved on another 
friendly visit for the purpose of a more thorough reconnoissance, and 
accordingly returned to Porto Rico. He found that his companions had 
been kindly treated and that the Indians were friendly, and believing 
he could get possession of the island peaceably he returned to Santo 
Domingoto solicil t lie appointment of Governor. He found, however, 
that during his absence Ovando had been superseded by Don Diego 
Columbus and that Cristoval de Sotomayor, a Spanish cavalier, had 
been appointed Governor of Porto Rico by the Crown. But Don 
Diego Columbus would not confirm his appointment or appoint Ponce 
de Leon, and sent Juan Ceron as Governor and Miguel Diaz as his 
Becond. Prompted by a love of adventure and the hope of bettering 
their fortunes Ponce de Leon and Sotomayor joined the expedition. 

In the meantime Ovando returned to Spain, where he gave such a 
favorable account of the character and services of Juan Ponce de Leon 
in Porto Rico that the King appointed him Governor of the island and 
intimated plainly to Don Diego Columbus that he must not presume 
to displace him. 

Ponce de Leon took charge in 1509, and founded the town of Caparra, 
about 3 miles inland from the bay of San Juan. It was afterwards 
named Puerto Rico and transferred to the present site of San Juan. 
Subsequently the island and the city exchanged names, although by 
what process does not appear. The site of Caparra, the first town 
founded, is now known as Pueblo Viejo. 

Having fixed the seat of government at Caparra, Juan Ponce de 
Leon began the pacification and colonization of the island in the usual 
manner. A conspiracy among the native caciques, led by Aqueybana, 
the brothei' and successorof him who had first welcomed the Spaniards 
to the island, was exposed and suppressed, but not without desperate 
efforts on the part of the Spaniards, the death of Sotomayor, and the 
destruction of such Spanish settlements as then existed. It does not 
appear that the colonists had any serious trouble with the natives 
thereafter. 

Lying between and practically controlling the Virgin and Mona 
passages from the Atlantic into the Caribbean Sea, Porto Rico occupies 
a strategic position of much importance, which, no doubt, was recog- 
nized at an early day. Certain it is that several attempts were made to 



HISTORY. 1 5 

wrest the island from Spain. Thus, in 1597, Admiral George Clifford, 
Earl of Cumberland, blockaded and captured San Juan, gfoid took pos- 
session of the island. But being forced by an epidemic of yellow fever 
to withdraw he destroyed the city, killed a number of its inhabitants, 
and carried off as trophies 72 pieces of artillery. Two years before, 
the English freebooter, Drake, had sacked and burned San Juan and 
destroyed all the vessels found in the harbor. These disasters led to 
the completion of the Morro of San Juan, commenced some time before, 
and an increase in the garrison of the island. In September, 1625, San 
Juan was attacked by a Dutch fleet of 17 vessels and a detachment of 
2,500 men. They landed and besieged the city for 28 days, but were 
finally forced to withdraw with considerable loss. In 1626 the French 
attempted a landing, but were repulsed. Between this and 1797 sev- 
eral minor and unsuccessful attacks were made. In April of that 
year, a British squadron and a detachment of 6,500 soldiers, under 
Lord Ralph Abercrombie, attacked San Juan, but withdrew after an 
investment of two weeks. From this time to the date of the American 
occupation of the island (1898) Porto Rico was exempt from outside 
attack. On May 12 the American fleet, under Rear- Admiral W. T. 
Sampson, in search of the Spanish fleet under Admiral Cervera, bom- 
barded the fortifications guarding the harbor of San Juan. After 
three hours firing the fleet withdrew, having ascertained in this way 
that the Spanish fleet was not there. 

On July 21 Major-General N. A. Miles, with a force of United 
States troops, landed in the bay of Guanica without serious opposition, 
and, on the 27th, occupied Ponce, which was surrendered on demand. 
Organized in three columns, numbering about 12,000 men, the Ameri- 
can forces pushed forward in the direction of Arecibo, Mayaguez, and 
Aibonito, meeting with slight resistance. At Aibonito, while about to 
attack that stronghold, word was received that the peace protocol had 
been signed, and hostilities were suspended. 

Porto Rico has also been free from serious civil disturbances, although 
earty in this century the native Porto Ricans manifested some signs of 
opposition to the insular authority, and a small republican faction 
proclaimed independence. But the prompt measures of Governor de 
la Torre, the presence of the troops, and the small area of the island 
prevented an outbreak. Some of the revolutionary leaders were 
executed. In 1868 there were manifestations in Ponce, Bayamon, and 
Arecibo, but, in consequence of the adoption of the Spanish liberal 
constitution of 1869, the island ceased to be a colony and was declared 
a province of Spain, although it had been nominally so since 1809. 

Notwithstanding the generally peaceful condition of the island, its 
material progress was slow. During the sixteenth century but 3 set- 
tlements were made, to wit: San Juan, in 1521; San German, 1513, and 



16 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OE PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Aguada, 1590; in the seventeenth, but 3 more were added, viz: Arecibo 
and Coamo, 1616, and Ponce, 1620; in the eighteenth century 28, and 
in the nineteenth, 3.5. In fact, for many years after its colonization 
Porto Rico was simply a military station, and practically, although not 
so designated officially, a penal colony, to which civil, political, and mili- 
tary prisoners were sent from Spain and from her colonial possessions 
in America. The population increased slowly, so that by the middle of 
the seventeenth century it numbered but 880 souls. During the next 
hundred years it had increased to lrl,883, and by 1812, to 183,011. 

The system of taxes and duties applied to Porto Rico was very much 
the same as in Cuba and other Spanish possessions. Up to 1781 the 
public treasury was under the management of a treasurer and an 
accountant appointed by the Crown, who were responsible jointly with 
the Governor of the island for all revenues. In that year, by a royal 
decree of May 21, the intendanc}^ of Porto Rico was established. 1 

The principal insular sources of revenue at the end of the last cen- 
tury were export and import duties {almojarifazgo)\ the tithes {diezmos)', 
the alcabala, or tax on all sales of merchandise products, etc. ; the tax 
on aguardiente and aloja, the latter a beverage of water, honey, and 
spices; the tax on stamped paper; on the introduction and branding of 
negroes; the estanco, a tax on the sale of negroes; the medias annatas, 
or tax on the salaries of certain civil and clerical officers; court fines, 
licenses, and the manda pia forzosa, a tax on mills. The salt works of 
Cabo Rojo, Guanica, and Coamo were also sources of revenue, and all 
unidentified property, such as cattle, etc., belonged to the King by 
authority of law. The export and import duties discriminated largely 
against all foreign merchandise. The tithes were established in 1501 
by a bull of Pope Alexander Vl and continued until abolished by royal 
decree in 1815. They were imposed again in 1830 and finally abolished 
in 1818. During this interim from 1815 to 1830 when the tithes were 
not collected and the tax on sales {alcahala) and existing restrictions 
on immigration were removed, a tax of 2£ per cent on the agricultural 
products of the island was substituted for the tithes. They were paid 
in kind from the crops after they had been gathered, and in 1789 
amounted to 69,720 pesos, a third of which went to the support of the 
clergy. 

But all these sources of revenue were insufficient to cover the expendi- 
tures, and but for the aid (situados) from the treasuries of Mexico 
and Guatemala, the condition of the Government would have been 
critical. From the year 1790 to 1809 the total amount received from 
situados vt&a 1,109,991 pesos, which was applied chiefly to the defenses 
of the island and the maintenance of the garrisons. The need for 
this help was full}' demonstrated when the payments ceased in 1809. 
The insular treasury being without sufficient reserve funds or other 

^enor Coll y Toste, Civil Secretary of Porto Rico.. 



HISTORY. 



17 



resources, and the people very poor, a period of financial distress fol- 
lowed, and in 1812 the usual expedient of governments without sufficient 
gold or silver money was resorted to, the issue of paper money. But 
this depreciated so rapidly that a silver peso was soon worth 10 pesos 
in paper, so that in 1815 the retirement of the paper peso was ordered. 
About this time the island was greatly benefited by the revolutions in 
Santo Domingo and the Spanish-American colonies, from which many 
Spaniards emigrated to Porto Rico, bringing with them capital, indus- 
try, and a knowledge of the cultivation of sugar and coffee. 

At the date of the American occupation the system of taxes, duties, 
etc., was practically the same as in Cuba; but, in strong contrast to the 
disposition made of the Cuban revenues, those of Porto Rico were 
expended in the island, and, with but few exceptions, no funds were 
sent to Spain except by way of loans to the Spanish Government. 
Again, the financial management was such that no insular debt existed, 
nor were the municipalities allowed to incur debts or to make loans 
except to meet their obligations to the insular treasury. 1 

From 1850 to 1890 the revenues and expenditures, every tenth year, 
were as follows: 



Year. 


Revenues. 


Expenditures. 


1850 

1860 

1870-71 

1880-81 

1890-91 


SI, 709, 170. 08 
2, 316, 095. 92 
2, 630, 000. 00 
3,786,650.00 
3, 683, 100. 00 


11,665,588.86 
2, 684, 746. 44 
1,943,081.20 
3, 615, 063. 22 
3, 633, 586. 60 



In the year 1897-98 the budget covered an estimated income of 
5,157,200 pesos 2 and an expenditure aggregating 1,751,012.19 pesos. 
In the year 1898-99 the estimated income was 5,107,092.89 pesos, and 
the expenditures 4,781,920.20 pesos. 

But, notwithstanding the favorable financial condition of the munici- 
palities and the surplus in the insular treasury, property owners 
throughout the island were greatly embarrassed, as appears from the 
following statistics taken from the report of Brig. Gen. George W. 
Davis, Military Governor of Porto Rico, September 5, 1899. In 1897 
the wealth of the island was estimated at $150,000,000, the total 
declared value of the city and country property being $28,867,928.79, 
while the mortgage indebtedness of the latter was $18,610,086.17, or 
64 per cent. Other indebtedness, General Davis reports, would no 
doubt raise this amount to $50,000,000, or one-third of the total wealth 
of the island. The rate of interest charged on mortgages was, on a 
large part of the loans, from 1 to over 24 per cent per annum, while 
on $6,000,000 the rate was not specified, but probably exceeded the 
above rate. 

1 The total municipal indebtedness of Porto Rico does not exceed $1,000,000. 

2 The peso was worth 60 cents United States money. 

8490—00 2 



18 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

The state of the laboring classes was usually that of extreme desti- 
tution, which, with the advent of the hurricane of Aug. 8, 1898, 
resulted in famine and distressing want, upward of 250,000 indigents 
being fed by the Government. 

The present economic condition of Porto Rico has been so fully and 
intelligently presented by General Davis in his several reports pub- 
lished during the past year that no further comments on this subject 
are necessary. 

Although the government for three hundred and fifty years was 
entirely in the hands of Spaniards to the exclusion of native Porto 
Ricans, and there was practically the same system of laws and taxation 
as in Cuba, and the same, or even greater, neglect of public education, 
yet the internal condition of the two islands differed widely, as a very 
brief examination will show. In Cuba great discontent was mani- 
fest among the natives, while in Porto Rico, except on one or two 
occasions, perfect tranquillity prevailed. This was probably due, in 
great measure, to the attitude of the mother country, which was more 
mild and conciliatory toward Porto Rico than toward Cuba, to the 
comparatively small expenditures in behalf of the insular government, 
the absence of an insular debt, and of periodical assessments in behalf 
of the Spanish treasury, and the greater prevalence of free labor as 
compared with the slave labor of Cuba. 1 Again, the character of 
Porto Rican emigration from Spain was quite different, being chiefly 
Catalans and Biscayans, from the Basque country, who went to remain, 
and who were devoted to the monarchy and the church, with a corre- 
sponding indifference toward liberal political principles, while Span- 
ish emigrants to Cuba were largely Castilians, Andalusians, and 
Asturians, who had no intention of remaining in the island, and had, 
therefore, but little interest in its material progress and government. 
The latter statement, made in 1876 by the honorable Caleb Cushing, 
American minister to Spain, is largely borne out by the agricultural 
statistics of the censuses of Cuba and Porto Rico just completed. 
While in Cuba the proportion of farm owners to the whole number of 
farms is but 28 per cent, in Porto Rico it is 93 per cent. On the 
other hand, the proportion of the cultivated area owned by occupants 
is but 43.5 per cent in Cuba, while in Porto Rico it is 91 per cent. In 
other words, a large proportion of the cultivated area of Cuba is in 
the hands of comparatively few landlords, some of whom reside out 
of the island, while in Porto Rico large numbers of the rural popula- 
tion own their homes and are permanent residents. 

Finally, the small size of Porto Rico and the presence of the Spanish 
garrisons and an organized militia were no doubt potent and peaceful 

1 According to the census of 1872, the proportion of slaves to the total population 
was 5.1 per cent, while in Cuba it was 27.8 per cent. 



GOVEKNMENT. 19 

influences, and effectually suppressed any disposition on the part of 
the natives to rebel against the established authorities, if, in fact, 
such feelings prevailed. That some discontent existed among them in 
1897-98, as the result either of their sympathy for the Cubans or of a 
desire for home rule, there is but little doubt. At all events, the 
troops of the American Army received from all classes of natives in 
all parts of the island occupied by them a spontaneous and enthusiastic 
welcome as deliverers and friends. 

GOVERNMENT. 

Porto Rico was founded and governed practically on the same plan 
as other Spanish colonial possessions, a full account of which will be 
found in the report of the census of Cuba just published. 

For many years the island was of so little importance that its gov- 
ernment was intrusted to officers of subordinate rank in the Spanish 
army; in fact, it was little more than a military post. (See Appendix 
V for list of Governors.) 

With the increase in population and the development of its resources, 
the office of Governor came to be filled by a general officer with the 
title of Captain-General. As in Cuba, the Governor was supreme in 
military affairs, and practically so in civil affairs, being president of the 
royal audience, or supreme court, and of all other tribunals, although 
for the decision of legal questions he had a legal adviser appointed by 
the Crown, whose opinions he might or might not accept. 

In 1825, in consequence of the revolutions in South America, the 
Captain-General was clothed with extraordinary powers, very much 
as in Cuba, but it is said they were never used to oppress the people. 
Until 1813 the intendancy (receipts and disbursements of the revenues) 
was vested in the Governor, but in that year it was placed under the 
control of an intendant appointed by the Crown. He was assisted 
by a secretary and a number of clerks, but could not order the dis- 
bursement of funds without the knowledge and consent of two chief 
officers appointed bj r the King, who had each a key to the treasury 
chest, and who could reject three times any order for the payment 
of mone}^ which they considered irregular or unjust. After that they 
were obliged to comply with the order, but could file a protest for 
their own protection. Of course this regulation, like all others, was 
for the ordinary transaction of business, the Captain-General having 
supreme control over the funds as well as over all parts of the machin- 
ery of government and its agents. 

For the immediate supervision over police and municipal affairs 
there was the eabildo, consisting of two boards, each composed of two 
alcaldes, two regtdores, and one sindico. Besides the caMldo, there were 
the ecclesiastical tribunal, the naval tribunal, and the consulado. 



20 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 189!). 

The first was composed of the bishop of San Juan and the treasurer of 
the church, and was for the management of all church affairs. Over 
this tribunal, as well as over the bishop and other prelates and the 
business relations and proceedings of the church, the Captain-General, 
as vice-patron, had supervision and control. He had authority to 
compel the observance of all church regulations or orders, to appoint 
all curates, and to suspend the bishop or any other prelate from office, 
reporting his action to Madrid. 

The naval tribunal had supervision and control over eveiy thing con- 
nected with the navy, including the trial of offenses committed by 
persons in the navy. It was presided over by the naval commandant, 
assisted by a legal adviser. From the judgment of the naval tribunal 
appeal could be made to the Spanish admiral commanding in Cuba. 
While the administration of this tribunal was in a measure independ- 
ent of the Captain-General, he was in supreme command of all the 
naval forces. 

The consulado was a tribunal for the settlement of all mercantile 
disputes arising under the commercial and mercantile laws applicable 
to Porto Rico. It consisted of a consul and two persons selected by 
the litigants or parties in interest. Before the tribunal the disputants 
appeared with their legal advisers. Cases were either arranged to 
the mutual satisfaction of the contestants or decided in favor of one 
or the other. 

Other features of the insular government were a civil secretary, a 
bureau or board of public works, and a chief of staff for the admin- 
istration of military affairs. 

From this brief description it will be seen that the entire government 
of Porto Rico — executive, legislative, and judicial — was for many years 
vested in the Captain-General, and that such boards or tribunals as 
existed were merely for the transaction of routine business. 

In short, up to 1870 Porto Rico was governed by the Captain-General 
as a Spanish colony under the laws of the Indies and such special decrees 
and orders as were proclaimed from time to time by the King. 

By a law of August 28, of that year, Porto Rico was made a province 
of Spain and given a provincial deputation consisting of deputies 
elected by universal suffrage. At the same time the island was 
divided into the seven departments of Aguadilla, Arecibo, Bayamon, 
Guayama, Humacao, Maj^aguez, and Ponce, having as capitals the cities 
of corresponding name. In 1874:, through the fall of the Republican 
Government of Spain, the constitution of 1869 was suppressed, and, 
as a result, the provincial deputation was abolished, and Porto Rico 
returned to the government existing prior to the law of 1870. In 
February, 1877, the new Spanish constitution of 1876, together with 
the provincial and electoral laws of December, 1876, were extended 
to Porto Rico, and the provincial deputation was reestablished, the 
members of which were elected by all male residents 25 years of age 



GOVEENMENT. 21 

or more who had received a professional diploma, or paid taxes to the 
amount of 25 pesos. 

In 1897 Porto Rico, in common with Cuba, was given an autono- 
mous government. It was inaugurated February 11, 1898, and con- 
tinued in operation until the time of American occupation, October 
18, 1898. 

The government consisted of a Governor-General and cabinet and a 
representative assembly of very limited legislative powers, elected by 
universal suffrage. 

On October 18 Maj. Gen. John R. Brooke, United States Army, 
was appointed Military Governor of Porto Rico. On November 29 he 
abolished the provincial deputation and made other changes in the 
insular administration. He was followed by Maj. Gen. Guy V. 
Henry, United States Army, December 6, 1898, who, by executive 
order of February 6, 1899, dissolved the insular cabinet or council of 
secretaries, and constituted the departments of state, justice, finance, 
and interior, each presided over by a chief or minister, with a salary 
of $6,000 per annum. 

On May 9 General Henry was succeeded by Gen. George W. Davis 
as Military Governor. By executive orders of August 12 General 
Davis abolished the departments of state, treasury, and interior, 
and their respective chiefs or secretaries, and at the same time created 
a bureau of state and municipal affairs, a bureau of internal revenue, 
a bureau of agriculture, a bureau of education, a board of public 
works, a judicial board, a board of charities, a board of health, a 
board of prison control, a board of insular policy, and the office of civil 
secretary to the Military Governor. The last official received a salary 
of $1,000, while the chiefs of the bureaus of state, internal revenue, 
and agriculture received a salary of $2,000 per annum. Through 
these bureaus and boards General Davis administered the affairs of the 
island wisely, thoroughly, and economically. 

On May 31, 1899, provision was made for issuing the writ of habeas 
corpus by any judge of instruction, and on June 27 trial by juiy was 
authorized. 

By the act of April 12, 1900, which took effect May 1, Congress 
made provision for a civil government to consist of a Governor and an 
executive council to be appointed by the President for four years, 
and a house of delegates of 35 members to be elected biennially by 
the qualified voters. 

The executive council is composed of the insular cabinet and 5 other 
persons of good repute. The cabinet includes a secretary for civil 
affairs, an attorney-general, a treasurer, an auditor, a commissioner of 
the interior, and a commissioner of education, all appointed for the 
term of four years. The executive council and house of delegates com- 
prise the legislative assembly of Porto Rico. 

On May 1 this government was established by the inauguration of 
Governor Charles H. Allen, of Massachusetts, and is now in operation. 



22 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 99. 

MUNICIPAL, DISTRICT, AND DEPARTMENTAL GOVERNMENT. 

Municipal government existed in Porto Rico from the beginning of 
its history, and b} r the commencement of this century there were 28 
municipalities. Owing to the political agitation resulting from the 
revolutions of the Spanish-American colonies all the municipalities 
except those of San Juan, Aguadilla, San German, Mayaguez, Ponce, 
Guayama, and Humacao were abolished in 1823, and seven military 
divisions or districts were established for civil and military purposes. 

At the head of each of the seven geographical divisions of the island 
was an officer of the army as the representative of the Captain-Gen- 
eral. He had his headquarters in the capital city and had limited 
civil jurisdiction. Similarly, all towns and villages of any importance 
had an alcalde or mayor, appointed by the Captain-General, who per- 
formed the duties of magistrate, and a committee of 12 property owners 
appointed by the Captain-General, who had charge of the public high- 
ways and the general affairs of the community. They met by order 
of the Captain-General, and at no other time, for the consideration of 
such matters as might be referred to them. 

By a royal decree of December 13, 1872, the municipal laws of Spain 
were extended to Porto Rico, the number of municipal districts was 
largely increased, and the districts were changed to the seven depart- 
ments now existing. The members of municipal councils were elected 
by all males 25 years of age paying 5 pesos in taxes, or holding a 
professional diploma. ' 

By executive order of September 21, 1899, General Davis established 
the qualifications of an elector as follows: 

He must be a bona fide male resident of the municipality, 21 years 
of age and a taxpayer of record, or able to read and write. He must 
also have resided in the island for two years next preceding the date of 
his registration, and for the last six months of said two years within 
the municipality where the election is held. Mayors, councilmen, 
municipal judges and their substitutes, and school trustees are elected 
annually. 

THE JUDICIARY. 

Prior to the year 1832 the laws and mode of procedure were the same 
as in Cuba and other Spanish colonies. The courts were limited, how- 
ever, to the judges of first instance and the municipal judges. There 
were no audiencias in the island, as it was under the civil and criminal 
jurisdiction of the audiencia of Santo Domingo, which, in 1795, was 
removed to the province of Puerto Principe, Cuba. By a royal decree 
of June 19, 1831, a territorial audiencia was established in San Juan, 
Porto Rico, and appeals were then made direct to the supreme court 
of Madrid. 

*For a description of municipal government, see Report of the Census of Cuba, 1899. 



ABORIGINES. 23 

At the date of American occupation each municipal district had a 
municipal judge, and there were twelve judicial districts each having 
a judge of first instance and instruction, with original jurisdiction 
in civil actions involving more than 200 pesos, as well as appellate 
jurisdiction over civil cases begun in the municipal courts. In crimi- 
nal cases they prepared evidence and made recommendations to the 
audiencias. 

There were three audiencias, one territorial of six judges, having its 
seat in San Juan, with both civil and criminal jurisdiction, and two 
criminal audiencias of three judges each, located at Ponce and Maya- 
guez, respectively. The judges were appointed by the Captain-General. 

A full description of the judicial system of Spanish colonies will be 
found in the Report on the Census of Cuba, and it is not considered nec- 
essary to repeat it here. It does not appear that the administration of 
the system in Porto Rico was free from the intricacies, delays, and 
defects of the system in Cuba, or that the court officials were different 
in character. In criminal cases the prisoner was supposed to be guilty 
until his innocence was established, and the burden of proof was 
thrown on him. 

Since the American occupation many salutary and important 
changes have been made in the Spanish system, as established in Porto 
Rico, including the discontinuance of the theory of the guilt of an 
accused person, ex parte investigations, and the incomunicado. For 
these, speedy and impartial trials, by jury, or otherwise, have been sub- 
stituted, while the writ of habeas corpus protects those who may have 
been unjustly confined. In August, 1899, on the recommendation of 
the judicial board, Military Governor Davis reorganized the courts, 
reduced the number of judicial districts from 12 to 5, and gradually 
introduced many American rules of procedure, and the system observed 
generally in the courts of the United States. 

As in Cuba, the jails and prisons were found filled with prisoners 
who had been in confinement for years either without trial or awaiting 
sentence, and their condition was one of great moral and physical 
degradation. This has all been corrected, and the penal institutions 
of Porto Rico will compare favorably in point of sanitation and good 
administration with such institutions in any other tropical country. 
Not until suitable buildings are erected can the discipline which pre- 
vails in the prisons and jails of a majority of the States of the Union, 
be maintained in Porto Rico. To this subject, however, the authorities 
are giving close attention. 

ABORIGINES. 

The Indian population of Porto Rico at the date of its colonization 
by Spain is said to have numbered between 100,000 and 600,000 souls. 
According to the historian, Fra}^ Inigo Abbad, who published an 



24 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RIOO, 1899. 

account of the island in 1788, "it was as thickly populated as a bee- 
hive." It is not likely that a correct estimate of the population was 
made by Ponce de Leon or any of his companions, and, as in the case 
of Cuba, the number will doubtless remain a subject of conjecture. 

Of the traits of the Indians of Porto Rico, Fray Inigo remarks that 
they were copper colored, although sallow and of darker complexions, 
short in stature, well proportioned, with flat noses, wide nostrils, bad 
teeth, and narrow heads, flat in front and behind, "being pressed into 
this shape at the time of their birth." They had long, thick, black, 
coarse hair, and were weak and indolent, regarding with aversion all 
exertion which was not necessary to their amusement or involved in 
fishing, hunting, or in obtaining food from other sources. They were 
governed by caciques, or chiefs, whose rights descended to the eldest 
son or to the eldest son of a sister. In an interesting account of the 
aborigines compiled by F. Bedwell, British consul to Porto Rico in 
1879, he remarks that "the orders of the caciques were announced as 
emanating from their tutelary god, Cemi, who was made to speak as 
desired by means of the buMtis, or medicine men, who were at the 
same time the priests. The huhitis hid themselves behind the statue 
of the Ceml and declared war or peace, arranged the seasons, granted 
sunshine and rain, or whatever was required, according to the will of 
the cacique who dictated, and when announcements or promises were 
not fulfilled, they declared that the Cemi had changed his mind for 
wise reasons of his own. 

"The chief doms were divided into small provinces, which for the 
most part only comprised the inhabitants of a valley; but all were sub- 
ject to the head cacique, who at the time of the conquest was Aquey- 
bana. He was actually governor in chief, the others being his 
lieutenants, who carried out his orders in their respective districts. 

"Men and unmarried women wore no clothing, but painted their 
bodies abundantly and with much skill, drawing upon them many 
varieties of figures with the oils, gums, and resins which they extracted 
from trees and plants. In this uniform they presented themselves in 
their military expeditions, public balls, and other assemblies. This 
simple costume, which was acquired with little labor, and was varied 
according to individual taste, was not without its ornaments and trim- 
mings, in respect of which opportunity was afforded for the display of 
skill and inventive powers, not only in the various figures and colors 
with which each one painted himself or herself, but also in the head 
dresses that were made with feathers of exquisite colors. They put small 
plates of gold on their cheeks, and hung shells, precious stones, and relics 
from their ears and noses, and an image of their god, Cemi, was never 
forgotten. The chief used as a distinctive emblem a large golden plate 
worn on the breast. Married women wore an apron which descended 



ABORIGINES. 25 

to about half their leg; but no clothing was worn on the rest of the 
boch*. The wives of the caciques wore their aprons to their ankles, 
except at the national game of ball, when they also wore short ones. 

"It is not known what formalities they used to celebrate marriages, 
but it appears that they took two, three, or more wives, according to 
their means of maintaining them, and that they abandoned some and 
took others at their caprice. The chiefs possessed a larger number of 
wives than their subjects, but one of them was generally preferred 
over all the others. They all lived together, it is said, without dis- 
playing jealousy or envy of the favored one. All, however, in effect, 
became slaves of their husbands; they dressed his hair each time he 
left his habitation, and they had, besides their domestic duties, charge 
of agricultural pursuits and worked in his fields. Those best loved 
were buried alive with their husbands on his decease, and if they did 
not voluntarily offer to accompany him to the other world, they were 
compelled to do so. Married men separated themselves from their 
wives for fifteen or twenty days before going to search for gold in 
the river, as they believed that otherwise their sight would not be 
good, and that they consequently would not be successful. They did 
not intermarry with relations of the first degree, from a belief that 
those guilty of incest died a bad death. 

"Their habitations or huts were constructed upon pieces of timber 
or trunks of trees driven into the ground at short distances from each 
other, and they were either oval, round, or square, according to the 
disposition of the land. Upon these posts they formed the floor of 
cane or sticks, and the walls were likewise made of cane, bound 
together by filaments with the leaves and bark of the palm tree and 
meeting in the center like the poles of a tent. They usually had 
neither windows nor chimneys, and light was only admitted by a 
narrow doorway. But there were other huts stronger and of better 
proportions. From the ground to the floor, which was likewise 
formed on the trunks of trees driven into the earth, they left an unin- 
closed space which served as a patio or courtyard, and in the higher 
story they left air holes or windows, made of cane. The roof had a 
double fall and was covered with palm leaves. 

"Fray Inigo remarks that, when he wrote, the habitations in the 
interior of the island were of the same construction, with a slight 
difference that the floor was sometimes made of boards, but that the 
huts were built upon stakes driven into the ground. 

"It is remarkable to notice how veiy little change has even yet 
taken place in this respect. I have seen hundreds of huts exactly 
similar to those described, even in the vicinity of towns of consider- 
able importance. This idea of building upon poles driven into the 
ground is dictated by the requirements of the climate, which is every- 
where exceedingly damp. The valleys and lowlands are often flooded 



26 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

by the rains and the rising - and overflowing of the rivers. The conse- 
quences of this are in some measure avoided by the houses being built 
upon posts at a certain elevation. The only wonder is that these frail 
constructions are not carried away by the gusts of wind. They are, 
however, carried away when their owners desire it, in a most easy 
manner. A pole to which wheels are attached is placed underneath 
the building, and it is thus wheeled off to the other side of the road, 
or the new site selected for it. This does not apply to the mere huts 
of the peasants, but to the more pretentious wooden houses, which are 
built in the suburbs of all the towns. 

' ' The hammock and the calabash shell formed the principal articles 
of furniture and cooking utensils of the aborigines; they do so of the 
GibaroN or white country people of to-day. 

" The Indians lighted their fires by means of three sticks, two of 
which were tied together at one end; they then placed the point of the 
third against the ends of the others, and beat them together between 
the palms of the hands, and thus ignited them with great facility. 

''Their arms were a bow and arrow and the macana, a wooden 
weapon in the form of a scimiter, to which they also gave the shape of 
an ax, and armed with stone. They were very skillful in shooting 
the arrow, but they did not poison their arrows as the Carib Indians 
did. They had canoes for fishing in the rivers, and for their sea voy- 
ages some large enough to hold 40 or 50 men; but all were hewn out 
of the trunks of trees. Trees of such dimensions no longer exist in 
Puerto Rico — three centuries and a half of wood and charcoal fires 
have had a disastrous effect upon the island in this respect. In many 
parts all the larger trees have completely disappeared, and seasons of 
drought are naturally experienced in consequence; yet nowhere are 
more beautiful or useful kinds of wood to be found than in Puerto 
Rico. 

"Fray Iiiigo says that the occupations of the Indians were as few as 
their necessities. They passed their days in their hammocks or squat- 
ting upon their heels on the ground, and they only moved with pleasure 
to dance or to eat. Their agricultural pursuits were limited to the sim- 
ple cultivation of maize, sweet potatoes, and plantains, and even this 
work was left to the women. Fishing and hunting were the pursuits in 
which the men were supposed to occupy themselves. They ate many 
grubs and insects, and not onl} r shellfish, but even lizards and bats, 
sa} r s the author, were favourite dishes. 

"Their religion consisted of the superstitious worship of the Cemi, 
whose image they carved and painted as their imagination dictated. 
They placed this image everywhere, and in their huts and habitations 
they set aside a dark corner to prajr to it for help in their necessities. 
Outside the villages they had a temple where the image of the tutelar 
god was placed. Thither the caciques repaired with the buhitis, who 



ABORIGINES. 27 

hid themselves, as previously described, behind the idol, and expressed 
by his mouth the will of the chief. In the religious ceremonies which 
they celebrated they took food to the Cemi, upon which the priests 
regaled themselves. Thej^ had a notion of two invisible beings — one, 
naturally benevolent, without prayer or supplication being necessary 
in order to obtain his favor — from the other they feared every mis- 
fortune, trouble, and calamity, and to him offerings and prayer were 
necessaiy to mitigate his anger. They regarded him as the enemy of 
mankind, from whom all evils sprang. Their religious ceremonies 
consisted of various humiliations, the scattering of certain powders 
over the head of the idol, and other superstitious practices, which were 
inherited from generation to generation, and thus, too, were handed 
down their images. 

'"Images of the Cemi have been found from time to time, and in 
quite recent years, in various parts of the island. These idols, 
although varying in size and in the kind of stone of which they are 
made, generally display similar characteristics. I have also seen 
some made of baked clay, which are smaller than those carved in stone. 
The carving on the stone is indeed truly wonderful, when it is remem- 
bered that the use of iron was unknown to them. 

" Don Jose Julian Acosta, of Puerto Rico, who has republished 
Fray Inigo's work, with copious notes, describes several of these 
antiquities in his possession, and observes that they show that at the 
time of the conquest the aborigines of Borinquen were in the second 
period of the age of stone. He remarks that the resemblance among 
the images of the Cemi serves to prove the unity of their religious 
belief, while the existence of these symbols in various and distant 
places — now on the coast, now in the interior — show that the island 
was inhabited in all directions. Senor Acosta believes that the skele- 
tons of the Indians yet exist in the grottos and caves which abound 
in the island, and which have not been explored. 

"The Borinquens believed that the dead would rise in a land of 
supreme delights, where eternal spring would be enjoyed, where they 
would find beautiful forests filled with every kind of game and 
watered by rivers abounding with fish, and where they would all 
enjoy the blessings of life, accompanied by their wives and their rela- 
tives who had preceded them. 

" When one of the chiefs or principal men fell sick, the priest-doctor, 
or buhiti, was called, who, after performing several superstitious 
ceremonies, purged himself, and observed the same diet as the sick 
man. If he did not strictly comply with this and other obligations, 
and the sick man died, the friends and relations sometimes put out the 
buhiffis eyes, beat him, or inflicted other punishment upon him. 
When the Indians saw that the sick were near their death they 
suffocated them, even if they were chiefs. After death they opened 



28 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

and dried the body by fire, and buried it in a large cave in which 
were interred also some live women, the arms of the deceased, and 
provisions for his journey to the other world. Sticks and branches 
of trees were then placed on the top and the whole was covered with 
earth, which was thus kept from the bodies of those interred. 

"Every event which was attended by either joyful or melancholy 
circumstances was celebrated by the areito or dance, accompanied by 
music, singing, and intoxication. Fray Inigo says that the areito was 
not exactly an amusement; it was rather a serious and important 
occupation. If war was declared, the areito represented the senti- 
ments which were to lead on to vengeance. If it were desired to miti- 
gate the anger of the Oemi, to celebrate the birth of a son, to mourn 
the death of a cacique or friend, there were special dances according 
to circumstances and the feeling by which the actors were animated. 
If some one was sick, they danced in order that he might recover, and 
the ouhiti danced for the patient if he could not himself support the 
fatigue of doing so. 

"All the dances were in imitation of some event, and although the 
music which governed their movements was very simple, the dances 
were lively and full of animation. The war dance was the most 
expressive of all. Every action of a complete campaign was repre- 
sented in it — the departure of the warriors, their entry into the enemy's 
country, the precautions as to camping, ambuscades, surprises, the 
fury of the battle, the glory of the victory, the conveyance of the 
prisoners — all was set before the spectators with such ardor and 
enthusiasm that it appeared to be fighting in earnest. The actions, 
manner, and tone of voice of the performers were in keeping with 
each incident, and always in accord with the music and singing which 
accompanied the dances. 

"The musical instruments were drums of various sizes, made out 
of the hollow trunks of trees, the macara, and the guiro, or guicharo, 
all made with the dried fruit of the calabash tree. These instruments 
may yet be said to be the national musical instruments of the island. 
Not only are they still used in the dances of the Gibaros, but the guiro 
or guicharo (the long calabash shell indented and played upon with a 
stick) is used in balls in society, as an accompaniment to the piano, and 
other modern instruments. It is even adopted by the Spanish military 
bands when they play the country dances. The songs of the Indians 
were serious and even historical, for in them were recounted the most 
important events of their life and their country; the genealog} 7 of 
their chiefs, the dates of their death, their fortunes in war, and the 
victories they had acquired, good and bad seasons, etc. 

"The areito was composed of a large number of persons; sometimes 
men only danced, on other occasions only women; at other times men 
and women together. They formed two rows hand in hand and were 



ABOKIGINES. 29 

led by a guide or master of the ceremony, who gave the time, and all 
followed, repeating the history which he sang. While some thus danced 
others gave drink to the dancers, who, Fray Inigo says, did not stop 
until they fell intoxicated, when their places were filled bj T others. 
The areito was concluded by all becoming intoxicated, with a drink 
made by the women of fruit, maize, and other ingredients, and with 
the smoke of tobacco which they imbibed by their nostrils. 

" Besides the areito, the Indians had a game of ball, for which they 
had places set apart in the vicinity of the villages. Both men and 
women engaged in this game likewise; but when not engaged in one 
of the occupations or amusements mentioned, the Indians passed their 
days smoking in their hammocks and were generally silent. 

"In bartering they little regarded the value of the object or that 
given in exchange for one the}^ fancied. They had neither money, 
weights, nor measures of any kind. The crime which the Indians 
invariably punished most severely was theft. He who took the prop- 
erty of another was impaled alive and thus left to die. It was regarded 
as a bad action to intercede for a thief, even if the mediator were 
his father or a near relative; thus the crime of theft was very rare 
among them.' 1 

Having completed the subjugation of the Indians Juan Ponce de 
Leon proceeded to enslave them under the Spanish system of reparti- 
mientos and encomiendas, 1 as had already been done in Santo Domingo, 
Cuba, and other Spanish colonies. As the result of their battles with 
the Spaniards, of disease and emigration to other islands, of hard labor 
in the mines, and other unaccustomed drudgery, the native population 
rapidly disappeared, so that in 1543 it was reported to the King of 
Spain by the bishop of San Juan 2 that there were but 60 native 
Indians in the island. At this time there are few traces of them 
remaining, at least this census has not discovered any. Still, in such 
matters no census can vie with a trained observer, and therefore 
attention may be called to the following statements of Capt. W. S. 
Schuyler in a report of August 30, 1899 : ' ' While work was being 
done on the roads, I had occasion to watch crowds of 700 or 800 men 
gathered about the pay tables at Las Marias, La Vega, and Anasco. 
The frequency of the aboriginal type was very noticeable. While it 
is almost certain that there is to-day no single individual in Puerto 
Rico of pure aboriginal stock, it is equally sure that the type can be 

1 A repartimento was a grant of land, which carried with it the right to the labor of 
the Indians occupying it or living within a short distance of it, at first for cultivating 
the soil. This privilege was subsequently extended so that the Indians could be used 
in any kind of labor. 

An encomienda was practically a grant of Indians, irrespective of the land. At 
first the grant expired with the grantee. It was subsequently extended through two 
or three lives, and in effect became perpetual. As a result the Indians were slaves. 

2 The first bishopric was established in 1512, and the Inquisition in 1513. 



30 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



seen everywhere in the mountain settlements. At San German I 
noticed a woman whose color, hair, and features were true Indian as 
seen in the southwest of the United States." (Report of Gen. 
George W. Davis, 1890, p. 312, f.) 

NEGROES. 

It is probable that a small number of negro slaves accompanied the 
earliest Spanish expeditions from Santo Domingo to Porto Rico, as 
slaves had been introduced into that island several years before. In 
consequence of the rapid disappearance of the native Indian popula- 
tion, the introduction of negro slaves into Porto Rico on payment of 
a tax amounting to 2 ducats per head was authorized as early as 1513. 
From the history of the island by Fray Inigo Abbad, it appears that 
through various imperial authorizations negro slaves were introduced 
into Porto Rico as follows: 



1530 
1536 
1540 



200 
200 
300 



1550. 
1551. 
1553 



250 
150 
400 



Thus, from 1530 to 1553, about 1,500 negroes were legality imported. 
It is probable that a corresponding number were smuggled to avoid 
the per capita duty. 

According to the same author, contracts for the importation of negro 
slaves continued throughout the seventeenth century, the privilege 
being held by the Genoese, Portuguese, and Dutch, sometimes Span- 
iards, and the French. Between the years of 1613 and 1621, during 
the government of Don Felipe de Beaumont y Navarra, 11 vessels 
laden with negroes entered Porto Rico. It is probable that during 
the seventeenth century other importations took place, legal and con- 
traband, as, from a general study of Porto Rican history, it appears 
that during that century its black population increased greatly over 
the population at the end of the previous century. 

A corresponding increase occurred during the eighteenth century, 
due to the commercial reforms which stimulated the progress of the 
island and gave an impetus to the slave trade. 

In 1760 a contract was made with Miguel de Uriarte for the impor- 
tation to several points of America — Porto Rico among others — of 
15,000 negroes. 

By a royal cedula of October 31, 1765, the Company of Caracas 
was authorized to introduce 2,000 negroes into that province and into 
that of Maracaibo, which had lost many of the natives by smallpox. 
As these negroes were taken to Porto Rico under a foreign flag, and 
thence to Caracas under the Spanish, the company was prohibited from 
exporting merchandise in the foreign vessels bringing the negroes 
or from transacting any business which might injure or affect the 



NEGROES. 31 

Company of Barcelona having a monopoly of the island's commerce, 
or which might affect the contract executed with Miguel de Uriarte 
and his partners relating to negroes to be brought to the island of 
Porto Rico. 

By a royal cedula of November 8, 1765, extended to the islands of 
Cuba, Santo Domingo, Porto Rico, Marguerite, and Trinidad, the 
King ordered the abolition of the taxes and duties which were being 
paid in the said islands for the introduction of negro slaves, there 
being substituted therefor a moderate capitation tax, to be paid annu- 
ally by persons engaged in the importation of slaves. This royal 
cedula contained other provisions which were beneficial to agriculture 
according to the economic ideas then prevalent. 

The number of negro slaves in Porto Rico in 1765 and for a hundred 
years later was as follows: 



1765 5, 037 

1794 17, 500 

1802 _ 13, 333 

1812 17, 536 

1820 21,730 



1827 31, 874 

1830 34, 240 

1834 41,818 

1846 51,216 

1860 41, 738 



From 1862 to 1872 the number of slaves was gradually reduced, as 
appears by the census of that 3 T ear, which gives the total black popu- 
lation of the island as 257,709, of which 31,635 were slaves. From 
these statistics it will be observed that the number of slaves increased 
rapidly to 1845 and steadily declined from that date. The decline and 
disappearance of slavery were due to the treaties made by Spain with 
England, the laws and decrees promulgated by the Government, the 
growing sentiment against it in all civilized countries, especially in 
England and the United States, and the corresponding watchfulness of 
British and American cruisers in West Indian waters. 

On the 22d of March, 1873, a law was passed by the Spanish revolu- 
tionary National Assembly abolishing slavery in Porto Rico forever, on 
condition that all freedmen should enter into contract for continued 
labor with their actual possessors, with other persons, or with the 
State, for a period of not less than three years. Three officials were 
appointed by the insular government to guard the interests of the 
slaves in all contracts. Articles 3, 4, 5, and 6 provided for the indem- 
nification of the owners of slaves on the basis of such an appraisement 
as might be determined by a board of officials and slave owners, for 
which the law made provision. 

As in other Spanish possessions, the slaves of Porto Rico were 
humanety treated, as a rule, and granted many privileges not accorded 
to them by other governments. Among these was the privilege of 
purchasing their freedom, of which, as shown by statistics, man}^ took 
advantage. 

As in Cuba, the black population has always been of great conse- 



32 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



quence to the agricultural interests of the island, more especially in 
the cultivation of the sugar cane. This fact largely affected the terms 
of the law of 1878, and caused the insertion of the clause requiring 
service under contracts. To have freed the slaves without this condi- 
tion might, and probably would, have resulted disastrously to the 
slaves as well as to the planters and others dependent on them for 
labor. 

CHINESE. 

The number of Chinese is so inconsiderable that no special account 
of them is necessary. Their presence in the island is entirely 
voluntary. 

SUMMARY OF PAST CENSUSES. 

In connection with the work of the present census, a summary has 
been made of all the past censuses of Porto Rico, of which the official 
figures were obtainable. This summary thus includes the census of 
1860, that of 1877, and that of 1887. The details for the Spanish 
census of 1897 are not available. 



census of 1860. 
white porto ricans, by nationality and residence. 



Nationality and residence. Male. 


Female. ! Total. 

l 




145, 148 ; 296, 821 
561 1 . 859 


Nonresident natives 1, 298 


Resident foreigners 1, 076 

Nonresident foreigners [ 281 


329 
40 


1,405 
321 




Total whites 154. 32S 


146,078 


300, 406 


1 



COLORED PORTO RICANS, BY NATIONALITY AND CIVIL STATUS. 





142, 089 


140, 686 


282, 775 




140, 386 


139, 692 


280, 078 


Free 

Slave 

Nonresident colored natives 


119, 459 
20, 927 


120, 084 
19, 608 


239, 543 
40, 535 


468 


299 


767 


Free 

Slave 

Free 

Slave 


414 
54 


236 
63 


650 
117 


982 


652 


1,634 


302 
680 


254 
398 


556 
1,078 


253 


43 


296 


Free 


248 
5 


40 
3 


288 
8 







PORTO RICANS BY SEX. 





1 

296,417 286,764 


1 583, 308 





1 Including 127 persons not classified. 




TYPE OF MESTIZO. 



CENSUS OF 1860. 
census of 1860 — continued. 

POPULATION BY MARITAL CONDITION, RACE, AND STATUS. 



33 



Race, sex, and status. 


Single. 


Married. 


Widowed . 


Total. 


Total 


433, 973 


123, 326 


25, 882 


1 583, 308 


White 


211,400 


73,913 


15,093 


::un, iih; 


Male 


112, 530 

98, 870 


37, 155 
36, 758 


4, 643 
10,450 


154, 328 
146, 078 






222, 573 


49, 413 


10, 789 


282, 775 




92, 190 
89, 354 
21,271 
19, 758 


24, 598 

24,220 

338 

257 


3,635 
7,040 

57 
57 


120,423 
120, 614 
21,666 
20,072 











1 Including 127 persons not classified. 



POPULATION BY RACE, STATUS, SEX, AND AGE. 





White. 


Colored. 




Age period. 


Free. 


Slave. 


Total. 




Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 






4,020 

35, 330 

30, 476 

13, 832 

15, 228 

14, 958 

19,146 

9,653 

6,318 

3,790 

928 

249 

273 

92 

29 

6 


3,991 

32, 600 

27, 290 

17, 331 

15, 346 

15, 200 

15, 732 

8,725 

5,556 

2,563 

988 

273 

326 

69 

67 

21 


3,935 

31,187 

25, 983 

11,257 

10, 212 

10, 469 

12, 243 

6,526 

4,658 

2,635 

872 

185 

153 

45 

48 

15 


3,764 

27, 571 

23, 535 

14, 223 

12, 718 

12,411 

11, 762 

7,072 

4,383 

1,809 

907 

167 

168 

32 

60 

32 


574 

3,584 

3,935 

2,273 

2,026 

2,220 

3,239 

1,902 

1,047 

597 

190 

36 

29 

6 

6 

2 


549 

3,499 

3,441 

2, 594 

2,133 

2,221 

2,792 

1,605 

778 

294 

116 

15 

23 

5 

5 

2 


16, 833 


1-7 


133, 771 


8-15 


114, 660 


16-20 


61,510 


21-25 


57,663 


26-30 


57,479 


31-40 


64,914 


41-50 


35,483 


51-60 


22, 740 


61-70... 


11,688 


71-80 . 


4,001 


81 85 


925 


86-90 


972 


91-95 


249 


96-100 


215 


100+ 


78 








154, 328 


146, 078 


120, 423 


120, 614 


21, 666 


20, 072 


i 583, 308 







1 Including 127 persons not classified. 



POPULATION BY RACE, SEX, AND LITERACY. 



Literacy. 


White. 


Colored. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 




27, 219 
127, 109 


17, 695 
128, 383 


3,714 

138,375 


2,758 
137, 928 


51,386 
531,795 




Total 


154,328 


146, 078 


142, 089 


140, 686 


J 583, 308 





1 Including 127 persons not classified. 



8490—00- 



. 



34 KEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

census of 1860 — continued. 

POPULATION BY RACE AND OCCUPATION. 



Occupation. 



Ecclesiastics 

Officials in active service 

Officials retired 

Military in active service 

Military retired 

Proprietors 

Laborers 

Traders 

Manufacturers 

Artisans ( industriales) 

Teachers 

Day laborers 

Paupers (pobres de solemnidad) 
Unknown (no contribuyentes) . . 

Total 



White. 



159 

874 

49 

11,133 

117 

8, 855 

17, 395 

3,091 

26 

871 

454 

18,833 

853 

17,993 



80, 703 



Colored. 



44 

12 

4,563 

9,642 

321 

6 

512 

15 

21,775 

672 

17,286 



54, 848 



Total. 



159 

874 

49 

11,177 

129 

13,418 

27, 037 

3,412 

32 

1,383 

469 

40, 608 

1,525 

35, 279 



135, 551 



CENSUS OF 1877. 
DE JURE POPULATION BY SEX, RACE, AND NATIONALITY. 



Race and nationality. 



Male. 



Female. 



Total. 



Total dt jure population 

Residents who were present 

White Spanish subjects. . 

White foreigners 

Mulatto Spanish subjects 

Mulatto foreigners 

Black Spanish subjects. . 
Black foreigners 

Residents who were absent . 

White Spanish subjects. . 

White foreigners 

Mulatto Spanish subjects 

Mulatto foreigners 

Black Spanish subjects. . 
Black foreigners 



367, 832 



363,291 



204, 305 

2,053 

117,350 

556 

37, 193 

1,834 



4,541 



2,979 
201 
907 

20 
415 

19 



361,613 729,445 



359, 313 722, 604 



198, 735 

1,258 

119, 685 

637 

37, 531 

1,467 



2,300 



1,295 

35 

682 

3 

274 

11 



403, 040 
3,311 

237, 035 
1,193 
74, 724 
3,301 



6,841 



4,274 

236 

1,589 

23 

689 

30 



DE FACTO POPULATION BY SEX, RACE, AND NATIONALITY. 



Ti >tal de facto population 

Residents who were present . . . 

White Spanish subjects 

White foreigners 

Mulatto Spanish subjects . . 

Mulatto foreigners 

Black Spanish subjects 

Black foreigners 

Nonresidents who were present 

White Spanish subjects 

White foreigners 

Mulatto Spanish subjects .. 

Mulatto foreigners 

Black Spanish subjects 

Black foreigners 



369, 054 



363,291 



204, 305 

2,053 

117,350 

556 

37, 193 

1,834 



5,763 



3,028 
500 

1,278 
203 
571 
183 



362,59-1 



359, 313 



198, 735 

1,258 

119, 685 

637 

37, 531 

1,467 



3, 281 



1,741 
92 
935 

57 
378 



722.60 1 



403, 040 
3,311 

237, 035 
1,193 
74, 724 
3,301 



9, 044 



4, 769 
592 

2,213 
260 
949 
261 



CENSUS OF 1887. 

census of 1887. JL765899 

DE JURE OR RESIDENT POPULATION BY SEX, RACE, AND NATIONALITY. 



Race and nationality. 



Male. Female. Total 



Total dejure population 396, 577 



Residents who were present 391, 311 



White Spanish subjects. . . 

White foreigners 

Mulatto Spanish subjects. 

Mulatto foreigners 

Black Spanish subjects. . . 
Black foreigners 



Residents who were absent 



White Spanish subjects. . . 

White foreigners 

Mulatto Spanish subjects. 

Mulatto foreigners 

Black Spanish subjects. . . 
Black foreigners 



232, 883 

1,678 

118, 758 

453 

36, 812 

727 



5, 266 



3,507 

75 

1,222 

9 

444 

9 



397, 055 



394, 178 



'231, 107 

1,228 

123, 221 

521 

37, 467 

634 



2,877 



1,721 

31 

809 

3 

311 

2 



793, 632 



785, 489 



463, 990 

2,906 

241, 979 

974 

74, 279 

1,361 



8,143 



5,228 

106 

2,031 

12 

755 

11 



DE FACTO OR PRESENT POPULATION BY SEX, RACE, AND NATIONALITY. 



Total de facto population 

Residents who were present 



White Spanish subjects. . . 

White foreigners 

Mulatto Spanish subjects. 

Mulatto foreigners 

Black Spanish subjects. . . 
Black foreigners 



Nonresidents who were present. 



White Spanish subjects .. 

White foreigners 

Mulatto Spanish subjects. 

Mulatto foreigners 

Black Spanish subjects. . . 
Black foreigners 



399, 021 



391, 311 



232, 883 

1,678 

118, 758 

453 

36, 812 

727 



7,710 



4,824 

15 

2,092 

1 

773 



399, 544 



394, 178 



231, 107 

1,228 

123, 221 

521 

37, 467 

634 



5,366 



3,188 

10 

1,599 

2 

566 

1 



798, 565 



785, 489 



463, 990 

2, 906 

241, 979 

974 

74, 279 

1,361 



13, 076 



8, 012 

25 

3,691 

3 
1,339 

6 



35 



DE JURE POPULATION BY SEX AND RACE. 



Race. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


White 


238, 143 
120, 442 
37, 992 


234, 087 

124, 554 

38, 414 


472, 230 
244, 996 

76, 406 




Black 


Total 


396, 577 


397, 055 


793, 632 





DE FACTO POPULATION BY SEX AND RACE. 



White 


239, 400 

121, 304 

38, 317 


235, 533 

125, 343 

38, 668 


474,933 
246, 647 1 
76,985 




Black 


Total 


399, 021 


399, 544 


798, 565 





POPULATION BY MARITAL CONDITION. 



Condition. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 




314, 536 
76, 156 
13, 595 


298, 710 
75, 371 
28, 340 


613, 246 
151,527 
41, 935 


Married 


Total 


404,287 


402, 421 


'806,708 





1 8,143 absent residents are included. 



36 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OP PORTO RICO, 1899. 
census of 1887 — continued. 

POPULATION BY SEX AND LITERACY. 



Literacy. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Able to read and write. 

Able to read onlv 


57, 216 

5,662 

341,409 


39, 651 

8,851 

353, 919 


96, 867 

14,513 

695, 328 


Total 


404, 287 


402, 421 


1806,708 



1 8,143 absent residents are included. 



POPULATION BY AGE AND SEX. 



Age period. 



Under 1 

1-5 

6-10 

11-15 

16-20 

21-25 

26-30 

31-40 

41-50 

51-60 

61-70 

70+ 

Total 



Male. 



11,273 
68, 095 
64, 957 
48, 979 
39, 083 
37, 182 
34, 256 
42,048 
26, 638 
20, 772 
7,614 
3,390 



Female. 



10, 833 
65, 160 
61, 902 
45, 489 
46, 975 
38, 753 
38, 685 
42, 710 
26, 262 
15, 430 
6,318 
3,904 



404, 287 



402, 421 



Total. 



22, 106 

133, 255 

126, 859 

94, 468 

86, 058 

75, 935 

72, 941 

84, 758 

52, 900 

36, 202 

13, 932 

7,294 



1 806, 708 



1 8,143 absent residents are included. 



TOTAL POPULATION BY SEX. 



Male 404, 287 

Female 402, 421 



Total 1 806, 708 

FORM OF POPULATION SCHEDULE. 

If the population schedule adopted for the Porto Rican census be 
compared with the schedule of the Eleventh Census of the United 
States, it will be found that, while in general design they are the 
same, they differ in respect to the number of inquiries, and that the 
latter is the more comprehensive of the two. 'This is quite natural 
and results from the simple and homogeneous character of the popu- 
lation of Porto Rico, in which a less extensive investigation is neces- 
sary to determine the state of the population than in the United 
States. In Porto Rico the industries of the people are quite limited 
and a very large majority of the population is native. 

The population schedule used in the present census, translated into 
English and reduced in size, is as follows: 



1 8,143 absent residents are included. 



POPULATION SCHEDULE. 



37 



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Name of every 

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with this 

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38 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

METHOD OF TABULATION. 

It was decided that to save time, which was important, the tabulation 
should be done by machine, and not by the old hand-tally system. 

As the electric tabulating machines, invented by Mr. Herman Hol- 
lerith, had been successfully used in tabulating the Eleventh Census 
of the United States, and were to be used again in the Twelfth, and as 
his system was known to be accurate and expeditious, it was adopted. 
Its operation is described b}^ Mr. Hollerith as follows: 

' ' The population of each enumeration district was first established 
by a so-called ' rough count ' ; that is, the number of persons recorded 
on each schedule were counted by two clerks independent of each 
other, and where such counts disagreed, a third, or even a fourth, 
count was made to determine the correct population of each enumera- 
tion district. 

"The detailed tables were then prepared by means of the electric 
tabulating system. For this purpose all the necessary data relating 
to each person were expressed b}^ means of holes punched in certain 
places in a card by means of the key -board punch. 

Pattern of the card. 



12 3 4 


X 


X 


1 


2 


B 


V 


12 3 


S 


Cu Cn It Af 










5 6 7 8 


Dw 
B 


J 


3 

5 


4 
6 


N 
M 


H 


4 5 10 15 
20 21 25 30 


c 
I'l 


PR Esp Pt Ast 
WI Ing Su Ch 


Esp 








12 3 4 


1 


18 


5 6 7 8 


o 
4 


3 
6 


7 
9 


8 
10 


Ch 
Jp 


35 

60 


40 45 50 55 
65 70 75 80 


V 
Un 


SA Ir Nr Jp 
CA Sc Di OC 


Cu 
Sus 








12 3 4 






























5 6 7 8 


6 




11 


16 
21 


In 


85 


90 95 100 Un 




Mx Al OE 
EU Pr * 


Ex 

I'n 






to 

CO 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 








g 


a 
b 






Po 
Ac 




X 

ss 


5 

6 1 


15 10 5 NG 

16 11 6 1 


L P 
M G 


A 
B 


12 3 4 


Po 


Mu 


Si 


SN 


5 6 7 8 


In 

Ni 


Pt 

Sq 


Alj 
R 


No 




4 


NN 
2 


<1 




7 2 

8 3 


17 12 7 2 

18 13 8 3 


N H 
I 


C 
D 








12 3 4 


5 6 7 8 


X 


X 


X 




8 


6 


f ; 9 4 


* 14 9 4 


P K 


E 









"If the record related to a white person, B, standing for bianco 
(white), was punched, while N was punched for a negro, or M for 
mixed, Ch for Chinese, etc. For males V was punched, and H for 
females. The age was recorded by punching for less than 1 year, 1, 
2, 3, or 4 for the respective years, 5 for the group 5-9, etc. Conjugal 



METHOD OF TABULATION. 39 

condition was recorded in the next field or division of the card. Birth- 
place was recorded by punching- in another division of the card PR 
for Porto Rico, Esp for Spain, It for Ital} T , OC for other countries, 
etc. Citizenship was similarly recorded. For each occupation two 
holes were punched, according to the number assigned to the given 
occupation in the corresponding classification of occupation, NG being 
punched for those without gainful occupation. Literacy, school attend- 
ance, education, and the sanitary condition of the dwellings, size of 
families, etc., were similarly recorded by punching in the respective 
divisions of the card. 

"At the extreme left a space of four rows of 12 holes was used to 
record the department, municipality, and enumeration district to which 
the card related. The combination of holes would ; of course, be the 
same for all the cards of a given district, and the holes were made 
not by the keyboard punch, but by the gang punch. 

"In addition, each card was provided at the extreme right-hand 
edge with a double number, one number indicating the sheet of the 
particular enumeration district on which the record of the correspond- 
ing person could be found, and the other indicating the particular line 
on which the facts were reported to which the card related. By means 
of the gang-punched holes and these numbers any one of the million 
cards corresponding to the population of Porto Rico could be identified 
and the correctness of the punching verified. 

"The punched cards were then passed through the electric tabulating 
machines. In this machine a series of electro-magnetically operated 
counters are arranged, according to the tables it is desired to compile, 
in electric connection with a circuit-closing device, the circuits through 
which are controlled by the holes in the punch-record card, which is 
placed on the bedplate of such circuit-closing device. 

"The cards relating to a given enumeration district were fed one by 
one into the tabulating machine, which recorded the number of native 
white males, foreign white males, colored males, native white females, 
the number born in Porto Rico, in Spain, the number less than 5 years 
of age, 5 to 9 years of age, etc. The sum of the details of each group 
of facts should equal the total number of cards tabulated, and, of 
course, should equal the population of the enumeration district as 
established by the rough count, thus providing a third check on the 
accuracy of the count. 

"At the same time that a card operates the counters it opens one 
compartment of the sorting box, into which it is placed when removed 
from the circuit-closing device. The object of such sorting is to 
arrange the cards to facilitate subsequent tabulation by means of 
which the more detailed tables are obtained. 

"By thus tabulating first one group of data and then another with 
intermediate sorting or arranging of the cards the various tables were 
obtained." 



DISCUSSION OF POPULATION TABLES. 



TOTAL POPULATION. 

The population of Porto Rico, shown b}^ the schedules of the recent 
census, taken as of November 10, 1899, was 953,213. This is a little 
more than two-thirds that of Cuba in 1899 and about the same as that 
of West Virginia in 1900. Previous censuses of the island in com- 
parison with this show the following results: 

Population at each census. 



1765 44, 883 

1775 70,250 

1800 155, 426 

1815 220, 892 

1832 330,051 



1846 447,914 

1860 583, 308 

1877 731,648 

1887 798, 565 

1899 953,243 



Prom the above figures the decennial rates of increase have been 
computed, with the following results: 

Rate of increase per decade. 



Per cent. 

1765-1775 57 

1775-1800 37 

1800-1815 26 

1815-1832 27 

1832-1846 24 



Per cent. 

1846-1860 21 

1860-1877 14 

1877-1887 9 

1887-1899 16 



The above figures show a remarkably uniform gradation in the rate 
of increase from 56 per cent per decade between 1765 and 1775 down 
to 9 per cent between 1877 and 1887. The surprising rise between the 
last two censuses may be due to a more thorough enumeration in 1899 
than ever before, although it must be said that if the lower rates of 
increase in earlier periods had been due to imperfect enumeration, it 
was scarcely to be expected that the series of rates of increase above 
given would have shown as smooth a curve. 

The last rate of increase, that between 1887 and 1899, is much less 
than that of the United States between 1890 and 1900 (21 per cent), 
but agrees with that of the state of Arkansas for the same decade. 

40 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899. 



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HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS 



AHosnS Co.Balto.Lith. 



TOTAL POPULATION. 



41 



Before making a comparison for departments and municipal districts 
between the population in 1887 and that in 1899 five changes call for 
mention. Three of them are merely nominal. The San Juan depart- 
ment of 1887 appears in the present census as Bayamon, the Sabana 
del Palmar district of 1887 is now Comerio district, and the Hato 
Grande district of 1887 is now San Lorenzo. Two municipal districts 
no longer appear in any shape in the list, for Ceiba has been consoli- 
dated with Fajardo, and Luquillo has been divided between Rio Grande 
and Fajardo. As the last change affects the boundary between two 
departments, in preparing the table below the municipal district of 
Rio Grande has been included in the department of Humacao, in order 
to ensure that the comparison in eveiy case is for identical areas. 



Department. 



Humacao (with Rio Grande) 

May apuez 

Guayiuna 

Aguadilla 

Bayamon (less Rio Grande) . 

Ponce 

Arecibo 

Porto Rico 



Population. 



1887. 



93, 214 
115, 926 
96, 991 
86, 096 
122, 862 
159,311 
124, 165 



798, 565 



1899. 



100, 866 
127, 566 
111,986 
99, 645 
147, 681 
203, 191 
162, 308 



953, 243 



Increase, 1887-1899. 



Absolute. Per cent 



7,652 
11,640 
14, 995 
13, 549 
24, 819 
43, 880 
38, 143 



154, 678 



8.2 
10.0 
15.5 
15.7 
20.2 
27.5 
30.7 



19.4 



The boundaries between these departments divide the island, by lines 
trending either north and south or east and west, into four regions, 
which may be called the eastern (department of Humacao), east central 
(departments of Bayamon and Guayama), west central (departments of 
Arecibo and Ponce), and western (departments of Aguadilla and Maya- 
guez). Each of these four divisions, except the first, is subdivided 
into a northern and a southern part. 

An inspection of the preceding table, with these facts in mind, shows 
that the central departments, except Guayama, increased faster than 
any of the three at the east and west ends of the island; that of the 
three departments at the ends of the island those at the west grew 
faster than Humacao, and of the four central departments the two 
west central ones grew faster than either of the east central ones. 
Each department on the north coast also grew more rapidly than the 
department directly south of it, viz, Aguadilla faster than Mayaguez, 
Bayamon faster than Guayama, and Arecibo faster than Ponce. The 
three most populous departments are the ones in which the rate of 
increase was above the average for the whole island. 

Among the 69 municipal districts into which these departments are 
subdivided 7 decreased in population between 1887 and 1899. As all 
of them lie on the coast, their situation suggests that the coast dis- 
tricts as a whole may have grown more slowly than the interior of the 
island. To test this hypothesis the population of the coast districts 



42 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



and of the interior districts has been found separately for 1887 and 
1899 with the following- results: 





Number. 


Population in — 


Increase. 




1887. 


1899. 


Absolute. 


Per cent. 




40 
29 


487, 704 
310,861 


573, 484 
379, 759 


85, 780 

08, 898 


17.0 




22.2 







From these figures it appears that the average increase of population 
in the interior has been more rapid than that on the coast. If the 
figures for the coast cities of San Juan, Ponce, and Mayaguez had been 
excluded the difference would have been more marked. The depressed 
condition of sugar-cane growing in the West Indies of recent years 
may have played an important part in producing this difference, for 
the growing of sugar cane is common in the coast plains of Porto Rico. 

The area of Porto Rico, including the adjacent and dependent islands 
of Vieques, Culebra, Mona, and Muertos, has been measured in con- 
nection with this census and found to be 3,606 square miles. But 
owing to the imperfect surveys on which all maps of Porto Rico are 
based, there must be a considerable and indeterminate margin of pos- 
sible error in any such measurement. The island is about three times 
the size of Long Island, which was in 1890 perhaps the largest insular 
division of the United States. It is also slightly greater than the 
eastern shore of Maryland (3,161 square miles). 

The relative sizes of the larger West Indies areas follows: Cuba, 
the greatest, is about equal in area to all the rest combined. Haiti, 
the second, is about two-thirds the size of Cuba, while on the other 
hand it is seven times the size of Jamaica and eight times the size of 
Porto Rico. Porto Rico, again, is more than double the size of the 
fifth island, Trinidad, which is itself about three times the size of the 
sixth island, Guadeloupe. 

The area, population, and density of population of the seven depart- 
ments of Porto Rico are given below. 



Department. 



Guayama 

Humacao 

Ponce 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Mayaguez 

Aguadilla 

Porto Rico 



Area in 
square 
miles. 



501 
413 
822 
021 
542 
407 
240 



Population, 



111,980 
88, 501 
203, 191 
162, 308 
160, 046 
127, 566 
99, 645 



953, 243 



Persons 

to a 
square 

mile. 



200 
214 
247 
261 
295 
313 
415 



Porto Rico has 264 persons to a square mile. This density of popu- 
lation is about the same as in New Jersey, nearly twice that in Pennsyl- 



CENSUS Of PORTO RICO 1899. 




URBAN POPULATION. 43 

vania, and thrice that in Illinois. It is more than seven times that of 
Cuba and nearly twice that of Hahana province. 

The table puts in a clear light the slight difference between the vari- 
ous departments. Aguadilla has hardly more than twice as many 
people to a square mile as Guayama. In Cuba, on the contrary, 
Habana province has over nineteen times as man}^ people to a square 
mile as Puerto Principe. This remarkable evenness of settlement in 
Porto Rico extends to the 69 municipal districts, the density of which 
is shown on the map opposite this page. The least settled district has 
58 persons to a square mile, or about the same number as Indiana. 
The densities of these districts range about 264, the density for the 
island, and depart from it by an average amount of 106 units, or 40 
per cent of that number. 

On comparing the preceding table with an earlier one showing the 
rate of increase in each province during the past twelve years, it will 
be seen that the two departments, the population of which has been 
increasing most rapidly, are two of the four in which the density of 
population is below the mean for the island. This suggests that the 
evenness of settlement now so conspicuous is not decreasing, but 
rather the reverse. The table shows also that each department along 
the northern coast is more thickly settled than is the department 
immediately south of it, viz, Bayamon than Guayama, Arecibo than 
Ponce, and Aguadilla than Mayaguez. 

URBAN POPULATION. 

[See Table IV.] 

The people of Porto Rico are, in the main, a rural community. 
There are no large cities in the island, the largest two being San Juan, 
which, regarding the entire municipal district as a city, had a popula- 
tion of 32,048, and Ponce, which with its port constituted practically 
one city, with a population of 27,952. These are the only two cities 
exceeding 25,000 inhabitants. The next city in magnitude is Maya- 
guez, on the west coast, with a population of 15,187. The onby other 
city exceeding 8,000 inhabitants is Arecibo, with a population of 8,008. 
The total urban population of the island contained in cities exceeding 
8,000 inhabitants each was 83,195, or only 8.7 per cent of the popula- 
tion of the island. This is a much smaller proportion than in Cuba, 
where the corresponding figures are 32.3 per cent, or in the United 
States, where the corresponding proportion in 1890 was 29.2 per cent. 

There were in Porto Rico 57 cities, each having a population of 1,000 
or more. The total urban population of the island, under this defini- 
tion, numbered 203,792, or 21.4 per cent of the total number of inhabi- 
tants of the island. Similar figures for Cuba show 47.1 per cent of 
the population of that island to be urban. 



44 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



The number of urban inhabitants in each department of Porto Rico, 
with the proportion it bears to the total population of the department, 
is shown in the following - table: 



Department. 



Aguadilla . 
Arecibo . . . 
Bayamon . . 
Guayama.. 
Humacao.. 
Mayaguez . 
Police 

Total 



rotal popu- 
lation. 



99, 645 
162, 308 
160, 046 
111,986 

88, 501 
127,566 
203, 191 



953, 243 



Urban 

population 

(1,000+). 



15,518 
21,166 
46, 728 
26, 829 
18, 219 
29, 463 
45, 869 



203, 792 



Percent- 
age ur- 
ban to 
total. 



15.6 
13.0 
29.2 
24.0 
20.6 
23.1 
22.6 



21.4 



From the above it is seen that the smallest proportion of urban 
population was in the department of Arecibo, where it constituted 13 
per cent of all the inhabitants. From this it ranged to 29.2 per cent 
in Bayamon department. The range in the proportion among the 
different departments was small compared with the corresponding 
range in Cuba. 

CENTER OF POPULATION. 

The center of population for Porto Rico has been computed for the 
inhabitants as distributed in 1899, and the center of area of the island 
has also been computed. The center of population is the center of 
gravity of the inhabitants of the country. If Porto Rico were a plane 
surface without weight and were loaded with its inhabitants distrib- 
uted as they were in 1899, each inhabitant being supposed to have the 
same weight, the center of population would be the point about which 
all parts of the island would balance. 

The center of area is similar if we substitute square miles or square 
yards for population. If the island be conceived as a plane surface 
of uniform thickness and density, the center of area would be the point 
about which all parts of it would balance. 

The method of computing the centers of population and of area has 
been described in the reports of the United States Census, and in the 
report upon the census of Cuba, so that it is unnecessary to repeat it 
in this connection. 

The center of population of Porto Rico was situated at a point 6.6 
miles west and 2.4 miles north of the little town of Barros. This point 
is near the southeastern corner of the municipal district of Ciales, in 
the department of Arecibo. 

The center of area is situated 3 miles north and 2.1 miles west of the 
town of Barros, and is thus 0.6 mile north and 4.5 miles east of the 
center of population. It is situated in the southern part of the munici- 
pal district of Morovis, in the department of Arecibo. Owing to the 
inaccuracy of the maps of Porto Rico it is impracticable to express 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899 . 



PORTO RICO 

SHOWING 

POPULATION. BY AGE AND SEX 



6 5 4 3 2 



i — i — n 



Age groups 

90 - 100 



m 



PERCENTS 



AHoen& Co.Balto.Lith. 



SEX. 



45 



its location in terms of latitude and longitude. That the center of 
population is slightly south and between 4 and 5 miles west of the 
geographical center is evidence that the western half of the island is 
more thickly settled than the eastern and the southern half has slightly 
more residents than the northern. 

SEX. 

[See Tables V and VI.] 

In a total population of 953,243 Porto Rico had 8,721 more females 
than males, an excess amounting to 0.9 per cent of the total popula- 
tion. In 1887 the excess of females in the dejure population was only 
478, and in the de facto population the males were 523 in excess. In 
1860 the males outnumbered the females by 9,653, or 1.7 per cent of 
the total population. It appears thus that the proportion of females 
is slowly increasing. An excess of that sex was found in six of the 
seven departments into which the island is divided. The following 
table gives the absolute excess of males or females in each department 
and the ratio which this excess bears to the total population of the 
department: 



Department. 


Absolute excess 
of- 


Ratio of excess to 
total population. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 






3,588 
2,066 
1,554 
1,197 
533 
506 


0.4 


2.2 
1.6 
1.4 
1.2 

0.6 ] 
0.3 
























723 


Porto Rico 








8,721 




0.9 







In no department did the excess of females equal the average excess 
of males in the island of Cuba (3.6 per cent) or the excess of females 
found in many other West India islands. As a marked inequality of 
the two sexes is usually a result and evidence of considerable migra- 
tion into or away from the district under consideration, so an approxi- 
mate equality in the numbers of the two sexes, both in the island as a 
whole and in its several departments, is probably connected with the 
slight amount of immigration, emigration, or migration within the 
island, and also with the small urban population, since an urban popu- 
lation usually contains a decided excess of females. The two depart- 
ments in which the ratio of males was highest are also the two which 
are growing most rapidly. This may point to some immigration of 
males to Ponce and Arecibo from other parts of Porto Rico. 

When the several municipal districts are examined with regard to 
the proportion of the two sexes, the three small outlying islands are 
found to have an excess of males, but among the sixty-eight districts 



46 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OE PORTO RICO, 1899. 



of Porto Rico proper it appears that the coast districts in rather more 
cases than the inland and upland districts have an excess of females, as 
seen by the following table: 



Class of district. 


Total 
number. 


Number with ex- 
cess of — 


Males. 


Females. 




39 

29 


11 
15 


28 
14 




Island 


68 


26 


42 



Of the inland districts one-half and of the coast districts only about 
one-fourth, have an excess of males. 

In the coast districts 48.5 per cent of the population are male, 
while in the inland districts 51 per cent are male. The three coast 
cities, San Juan, Ponce, and Mayaguez, collectively, contain 48.5 
per cent of males, or the same as for the coast districts as a whole. 
The percentage of males, therefore, in the inland districts is percep- 
tibly higher than along the coast. 

AGE. 

[See Tables VIII and IX.] 

Probably the best single and simple expression for the age of a great 
number of people like the inhabitants of Porto Rico is what is called 
the median age; that is, the age such that half the members of the 
population group under consideration are younger and half are older. 
To compute it accurately, the census tables should present the ages by 
single years. That information being given, it is easy to ascertain 
within what single year of life the median age must lie. It is then 
assumed that within the year of age thus fixed the persons were evenly 
distributed; in other words, that there were as many persons living in 
the first tenth of the year as in each other tenth. In this way the 
median age of the population of the United States in 1890 has been 
fixed at 21.9 years. The present census of Porto Rico reports ages 
above 5 not by single years but by periods of years, usually five, 1 
and, accordingly, to get the median age it has been necessary to dis- 
tribute the population of Porto Rico for one age period to the single 
years. In so doing it has been assumed that the number of each year 
of age in that period bears the same proportion to the total in Porto 
Rico that it does in the United States. The median age in Porto Rico 

x The division of the group 15-19 at 17 enables one to know the population of school 
age, 5-17, and that of age to serve in the militia, 18-44. The division of the group 
20-24 at 20 enables one to know the potential voters. The division of the group 0^4 
into single years allows a study of the balance between birth rate and death rate 
during the early years, before it is seriously affected by migration. 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899. 







£>ri 




AGE. 



47 



as thus found is 18.1 years. That in Cuba is 20.7 years, and in the 
United States in 1890 it was 21.9 years. The people in Porto Rico, 
therefore, are more than 2 years younger than those in Cuba and 
nearly 4 years younger than those in the United States. While the 
median age in Porto Rico is much below that in Cuba or in the whole 
United States, it is higher than that in seven American states in 1890, 
including most of those with a large negro population. The median 
age of the several departments of Porto Rico is as follows: 



Department. 



Guayama. 
Arecibo. .. 
Humacao. 
Aguadilla 
Bayamon . 

Ponce 

Mayaguez 



Median 



17.3 
17.6 
17.7 
17.9 
18.2 
18.5 
19.1 



The populations of the 7 provinces differ comparatively little in 
median age, the range between Guayama and Mayaguez being less 
than two years, while in Cuba the range between the 6 provinces 
is over five years, and in the United States the range between the 49 
divisions for which the age constitution was reported in 1890 was no 
less than twelve years. This uniformity in age composition of the 
several departments of Porto Rico is another statistical witness to the 
similarity of economic and social conditions throughout the island. 

In the preceding table one may notice, however, that the three 
departments of Bayamon, Ponce, and Mayaguez, containing the only 
cities of much size in Porto Rico, are the three in which the median 
age is greatest. It may be that these two facts are connected, that is, 
that the population of these cities has so high a median age as to raise 
that for the departments in which they lie. To test the fact the fol- 
lowing table has been constructed, showing the median age for these 
three cities and that for the rest of the department containing the 
city. The former has been called the urban and the latter the rural 
population. 



Department. 



Bayamon 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



Median age of — 



Urban 
popula- 
tion. 



22. 3 
21.9 
22.2 



Rural 
popula- 
tion. 



16.7 
18.6 

17.7 



Differ- 
ence. 



5.6 
3.3 
4.5 



4.5 



From the preceding table it appears that the median age of the 
rural population in Bayamon, Ponce, and Mayaguez averages below 
that for the entire island, but that the median age of the three large 



48 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



cities, Mayaguez, Ponce, and San Juan, is from three to five years 
higher than that for the rural districts in the same department 
Hence the hypothesis which the table was designed to test is estab- 
lished. The population of these three cities treated as a unit has a 
median age of 22. 2, while the median age for the rest of Porto Rico 
is only 17.7 years. The average difference between city and country 
in Porto Rico is more than double that between the two most widely 
divergent departments. 

The median age is a summary expression of the age constitution and 
gives only a preliminary idea of the facts. The analysis is carried a 
step farther by the following table, in which the three population 
groups are compared in more detail. The table states the proportion 
that the number of persons in each ten-year period from the begin- 
ning to the end of life made of the total population of all ages. 

Age constitution of the population of Porto Rico, by ten-year periods, compared with that 
of Cuba and the United States. 



Age period. 


Per cent of total population 
in age period named. 


Porto 
Rico. 


Cuba. 


United 

States 
(1890). 


0-9 


30.9 
22.8 
18.1 
11.7 
7.4 
5.1 
2.6 
0.9 
0.4 
0.1 


22.7 

25.3 

18.5 

13.9 

9.2 

5.8 

3.1 

1.0 

0.4 

0.1 


24.3 

21.7 

18.3 

13.5 

9.4 

6.4 

3.9 

1.8 

0.4 


10-19. . . 


20 29 


30-39 


40-49. . . 


50-59 


60-69 


70-79. . . 


80-89 


90-99 


100+ 










0.3 


Total 






100.0 


100.0 


100.0 





This table shows that the proportion of children under ten in Porto 
Rico is notably higher than it is in Cuba or the United States. It is 
also much higher than in most countries of Europe, for the only 
European country with a higher proportion among the eighteen men- 
tioned in an accessible summary of recent censuses 1 is Bulgaria, in 
which 31.5 per cent of the population was reported by the census of 
1888 as under ten. There is no American state in which, by the cen- 
sus of 1890, the proportion of children under ten was as large as it is 
in Porto Rico. If the population of the United States be taken as the 
standard, the population of Porto Rico contains many more young 
children, a few more children in their teens, about the same propor- 
tion of persons in the twenties, but a noticeably smaller proportion of 
persons in each subsequent decennial period until the ages of eighty 
and over, when the proportions are apparently about the same as in 
the United States, or even greater. Of persons over sixty there are 
in Porto Rico only 10 in 1,000, while in the United States there are 

1 Allgenieines Statistisches Archiv III, 472 (1894). 



AGE. 



49 



62. If we assume that in both countries children under ten and aged 
persons over seventy are supported by persons between ten and sev- 
enty, then in Porto Rico there would be 47 such dependents, young or 
old, for every 100 persons between ten and seventy, while in the United 
States there would be only 36. 

There are fewer elderly persons over sixty in Porto Rico than in 
the United States or Cuba, and all three have a lower proportion of 
aged persons than any of the eighteen countries of Europe. The small 
proportion in Porto Rico is due in part to the rapid growth of popu- 
lation, but also in large degree to the short average lifetime of the 
people, resulting from unsanitary conditions, ignorance regarding care 
for the health, and poverty, all of which are widely prevalent among 
certain classes. 

The analysis may be carried one step farther by finding the propor- 
tion of the population belonging to each period of five years between 
birth and death. The results, in comparison with those for the United 
States and Cuba, and also with an artificial stationary population from 
which the errors due to misstatement of age or to uneven growth of 
population have been excluded, are contained in the following table: 

Age constitution of the population of Porto Rico compared with that of Cuba and the 
United States, by five-year age periods. 



Age period. 


Porto 
Rico. 


Cuba. 


United 

States 
(1890). 


Farr's 

English 

life 

table. 


0-4 


15.8 
15.1 
13.0 
9.8 
9.3 
8.8 
6.8 
5.0 
4.6 
2.8 
3.5 
1.6 
1.9 
0.7 
0.6 
0.2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 


8.3 
14.4 
14.0 
11.3 

9.7 
8.7 
7.6 
6.3 
5.4 
3.8 
3.7 
2.2 
2.2 
0.9 
0.7 
0.3 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 


12.2 
12.1 
11.2 

10.5 
9.9 
8.4 
7.3 
6.2 
5.1 
4.4 
3.7 
2.7 
2.3 
1.6 
1.1 
0.6 - 
0.3 
0.1 


9.8 
8.8 
8.5 
8.2 
7.9 
7.6 
7.2 
6.8 
6.4 
5.9 
5.4 
4.8 
4.2 
3.4 
2.4 
1.5 
0.8 
0.3 
0.1 


5-9 


10-14 


15-19 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40-44 


45-49 


50-54 


55-59 


60-64 


65-69 


70-74 


75-79 


80-84 


85-89 


90-94 


95-99 . . . 




100+ 
















0.3 




Total 








100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 





The great number of young children previously noted is emphasized 
by the preceding table. In each of the first two age periods there are 
about 3 more children to 100 of the total population than there are 
in the United States; that is, in an average 100 Porto Ricans there 
are between 6 and 7 more children under 10 than there are in an aver- 
age 100 Americans. Porto Rico has a larger proportion of children 
under 5 than any American state in 1890, and a larger proportion of 
children between 5 and 10 than any American state in 1890, except 
8490—00 4 



50 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



South Carolina and Mississippi. This large proportion of young chil- 
dren witnesses clearly to a very high birth rate on the island, and there- 
fore, as the population has not increased with very great rapidity 
and has not been much influenced by immigration or emigration, it 
testifies indirectly to a very high death rate. 

An examination of the preceding table shows also that during adult 
life, and especially the later years, the proportions, and therefore the 
numbers, in Porto Rico belonging to the successive quinquennial groups 
vary irregularly. For example, the proportion of persons between 
50 and 55 is much larger than the proportion of persons between 45 
and 50. One would expect the number in each group through middle 
life to fall below that of the next younger group by a somewhat con- 
stant proportion. That it does not is perhaps sufficiently obvious 
from the table, but the fact is more distinctly brought out in the fol- 
lowing derivative table: 

Number and per cent by which the reported population at the age group named fell below 
the number in the preceding age group. 



Age group. 


Difference 
between 
group named 
and preced- 
ing quin- 
quennial 
group. 


Per cent that 
difference 
makes of 
total in pre- 
ceding 
quinquennial 
group. 


10-14 


-19,193 
-31,205 

- 4,673 

- 4,210 
-19, 948 
-16,761 

- 3, 310 
-17, 849 
+ 6,474 
-17,541 
+ 3,056 
-11,707 

- 433 

- 3,863 
+ 276 

- 1,886 

- 105 

- 368 


13.3 
25.0 

5.0 

4.7 
23.6 
26.0 

6.9 
40.3 
24.5 
53.3 
19.9 
63.6 

6.4 
61.8 
11.5 
70.9 
13.5 
55.0 


15-19 ... 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 . . 


35-39 


40-44 


45-49 


50-54 


55-59 


60-64 


65-69 


70-74 


75-79 


80-84 


85-89 


90-94 


95-99 





Such irregularity in the decrease with advancing years is counter to 
all the probabilities in the case. The most simple hypothesis that 
arises to explain it is errors in the reporting of ages. Where such 
errors occur they reveal themselves in the large number of persons 
whose age is reported as a multiple of 5 or especially of 10. Hence, as 
a result of this tendency, quinquennial groups containing a multiple of 
10 are erroneously swollen and the intervening groups correspondingly 
diminished. An examination of the preceding table will show that 
this is true of the reported ages in Porto Rico. Farther evidence of 
the irregularity may be found in the following table. The number of 
persons in each quinquennial group has been compared with half the 
sum of the numbers in the groups immediately preceding and follow- 
ing. If the curve representing the population by age groups were a 
straight descending line (for a stationary population and through the 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899 . 



PORTO RICO 

CONJUGAL CONDITION RACE, NATIVITY AND SEX 



] SINGLE 
1 MARRIED 



LIVING TOGETHER 



WAGE EARNERS 
BY RACE AMD NATIVITY 



















')' 












































■:• 




:■{'■:' 


















.1- 














. 




•!■'.■' 




























#P 












1 


*>!-. '1' "h;. 










, 




1 ! •■! 












: 


._.(■.-.(. T.v; 



AGRICULTURE 

TRADE AND TRANSPORTATION 

MANUFACTURES AND MINING 

PERSONAL SERVICE 

NATIVE WHITE 



] FOREIGN WHITE 
[.' •••'■".] COLORED 













. :L! 














j i 














-4 |—| - 
























! j J 












' 








■+ 


■ — 


..1 .1 








1 f 1 • 






_L Li-l - 






n i 1 



NATIVE WHITE 
FOREIGN WHITE 



] pOLORED 



"1 FEMALE 

OCCUPATIONS 
BY SEX 



1 












































H— 










t- 


"- 




Eg 


' ' I' ' 
















1 
















_ .:. .. 
































































• 












. 




11 ! ! 



AGRICULTURE 

TRADE AND TRANSPORTATION 

MANUFACTURES AND MINING 

PERSONAL SERVICE 

NO OCCUPATION 



A.HoenS Co.Balto.Lrth. 



AGE. 



51 



years of adult life it closely approaches a straight line), the number 
thus found would in each case be 100 per cent. The departures from 
100 per cent, therefore, in the following table measure approximately, 
and the departures from the figures in the first column measure more 
accurately, the irregularity and probable error in the reported ages in 
Porto Rico. Columns for the United States and Cuba are introduced 
for comparison. 

Per cent that population in each quinquennial group makes of the arithmetical mean of 
population in the next younger and next older groups. 



Age group. 



5-9.. 
10-14. 
15-19. 
20-24. 
25-29 . 
30-34. 
35-39. 
40-44. 
45-49. 
50-54. 
65-59 . 
60-64. 
65-69. 
70-74, 
75-79, 
80-84 , 
85-89. 
90-94 



English 

life table, 

No. 3. 



84.2 

96.8 

100.4 

100.4 

100. 2 

100.2 

100.2 

100.2 

100.4 

100.6 

101.0 

101.4 

101.6 

100.4 

95.8 

85.8 

69.6 

50.4 



Porto 
Rico. 



104.5 
105.2 

87.6 

99.8 
105.4 

97.7 

87.7 
119.6 

68.6 
157. 5 

59.9 
167.9 

54.3 
128. 3 

54.3 
175. 

47.1 
140.0 



Cuba. 



128.8 
109.0 

95.4 

97.0 
101.2 
100.4 

97.4 
107.2 

83.8 
123. 

73.4 
144.0 

60.6 
128.4 

53.8 
157.2 

42.4 
146. 4 



United 
States 
(1890). 



103.2 
99.6 
99.2 

105. 2 
97.0 

100.6 
99.6 
96.6 
99.2 

105.6 
88.4 

108.6 
93.6 

100.0 
86.8 
87.0 
66.2 
58.4 



By disregarding the first two age groups and finding for each fol- 
lowing group the differences between the figures in the first column 
and those in each other column, one obtains a measure of the real or 
alleged excess or deficiency of population in certain age periods. 

Measure of excess ( + ) or deficiency ( — ) of population in age group named. 



Age group. 



15-19, 
20-24, 
25-29, 
30-34 
35-39 
40-44 
45^9 
50-54 
55-59 
60-64 
65-69 
70-74 
75-79 
80-84 
85-89 
90-94 







United 


Porto Rico. 


Cuba. 


States 
(1890). 


-12.8 


- 5.0 


- 1.2 


- 0.6 


- 3.4 


+ 4.8 


+ 5.2 


+ 1.0 


- 3.2 


- 2.5 


+ 0.2 


+ 0.4 


-12.5 


- 2.8 


- 0.6 


+19.4 


+ 7.0 


- 3.6 


-31.8 


-16.6 


- 1.2 


+56.9 


+22.4 


+ 5.0 


-41.1 


-27.6 


—12. 6 


+66.5 


+42.6 


+ 7.2 


-47.3 


-41.0 


- 8.0 


+37.9 


+28.0 


- 0.4 


-41.5 


-42.0 


- 9.0 


+89.2 


+71.4 


+ 1.2 


—22. 1 


-27. 2 


- 3.4 


+89.6 


+96.0 


+ 8.0 



In all three countries the population in age groups including a mul- 
tiple of 10 was usually in excess, and that in other age groups in 
deficiency. In Cuba the deviation from tKe standard after the age of 
30 was greater and in most instances many times greater than in the 
United States, and in Porto Rico with few exceptions it was much 
greater than in Cuba. In the United States where ages are reported 



52 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



by single years it can easily be shown that the irregularity of the age 
curve is due to the reporting of ages as 30, 4o, etc., when the persons 
are near but not at those ages. This tendency is most marked among 
the uneducated. The preceding table shows that in both of the Spanish 
West India islands a similar tendency is at work with greater effect 
than in the United States, and that in Porto Rico it is more influ- 
ential than in Cuba. Minor differences between the three countries 
may also be traced in the table. Thus, in both the West India islands, 
especially in Cuba, there seems to be a depletion of the age period 20 
to 24 and a concentration on the following 5-year period, while in the 
United States the reverse is true. On the other hand, here is a very 
marked concentration in both islands on the age periods 40 to 44 and 
70 to 74 which is lacking in the United States, where there is a curious 
avoidance of those periods in the reporting of ages. 

In a single case this explanation may be further tested. In Table 
IX the number of persons 20 years of age is given as well as those 
21-24. In Farr's Life Table the persons 20 years of age are 20.3 per 
cent of the total in the group 20-24. In the United States the propor- 
tion for both sexes was 20.7, but as males in the United States are fond 
of saying they are of voting age, and the year 21 is a favored one with 
them, it may be better to compare the Porto Rican figures for this 
group with those for females in the United States. Of all females in 
the United States 20-24, 22.4 per cent reported themselves as 20 years 
of age. In Porto Rico, on the contrary, of all persons 20-24, 33.6 per 
cent reported themselves as 20. This confirms the explanation already 
offered, that the Porto Ricans stated their age in round numbers as some 
multiple of ten far more commonly than the Americans did in 1890. 

The per cent of the total population of each department belonging 
to each quinquennial age period is shown in the following table: 

Per cent of total population belonging to age period stated. 



Age period. 


Aguadilla. 


Arecibo. 


Bayamon. 


Guayama. 


Himiacao. 


Mayaguez. 


Ponce. 


0-4 


16.2 
15.2 
13.0 
9.6 
8.9 
8.5 
6.8 
4.9 
4.7 
2.7 
3.5 
1.7 
2.0 
0.8 
0.7 
0.3 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 


15.9 
15.8 
13.2 
9.7 
9.2 
8.9 
6.9 
5.0 
4.6 
2.5 
3.3 
1.4 
1.8 
0.6 
0.6 
0.2 
0.2 
0.1 
0.1 


15.8 
14.9 
12.9 
9.9 
9.3 
9.0 
6.6 
5.1 
4.5 
2.9 
3.2 
1.7 
2.0 
0.8 
0.7 
0.3 
0.2 
0.1 
0.1 


16.7 
15.7 
13.2 
9.5 
9.0 
8.7 
6.6 
4.7 
4.5 
2.6 
3.4 
1.6 
1.9 
0.6 
0.6 
0.2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 


16.5 
15.1 
13.3 

9.4 
8.7 
8.4 
6.4 
4.9 
4.6 
3.1 
3.6 
1.7 
2.1 
0.8 
0.7 
0.2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 


14.7 
13.9 
12.8 
10.3 
9.5 
8.7 
7.0 
5.2 
5.0 
3.0 
3.7 
1.8 
2.1 
0.8 
0.7 
0.3 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 


15.3 


5-9 


14.9 


10-14 


13.0 


15-19 


9.9 


20-24 

25-29 


9.8 
9.2 


30-34 


6.8 


35-39 


5.0 


40-44 


4.6 


45-49 


2.8 


50-54 


3.5 


55-59 


1.5 


60-64 


1.8 


65-69 


0.6 


70-74 


0.6 


75-79 


0.2 


80-84 


0.3 


85-89 


0.1 


90-94 


0.1 


95-99 




100+ . . 
















































Total 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



AGE. 



53 



This table throws some light upon the table already given (p. 47), 
showing median age by departments. For example, from the for- 
mer table it appeared that the median age in Mayaguez was more 
than half a year higher than that of any other department. From the 
present table it appears that Mayaguez has a smaller proportion of 
children under 15, and a larger proportion of persons at each age 
period but one between 30 and 60, than any other department. The 
median age of the population is closely dependent upon the proportion 
of children under 15. This appears from the following table, in which 
the departments are arranged in the order of their median age, and the 
proportion of children under 15 to the total population is given: 



Department. 



Guayama 
Arecibo . . 
Hurnacao 
Aguadilla 
Bayamon 

Ponce 

Mayaguez 





Proportion 


Median 


of popula- 


age. 


tion under 




15 years. 


17.3 


45.6 


17.6 


44.9 


17.7 


44.9 


17.9 


44.4 


18.2 


43.6 


18.5 


43.2 


19.1 


41.4 



It will be seen that the departments with a low median age are 
uniformly those with a high proportion of children, while those with 
a high median age are those in which the proportion of children is 
smaller. 

In the same way, the high median age of the urban population is due 
to the small proportion of children under 15 found in the cities of 
Porto Rico. Treating the population of these cities as a unit, it 
appears that the children under 15 therein constituted only 32 
per cent of the total population of the cities, while in the rest of Porto 
Rico such children constituted 14.9 per cent, a difference between city 
and country of 12.9 per cent, or thrice that separating the two most 
diverse departments. 

AGE AND SEX. 

In Porto Rico the median age of the males is 17.5 years, while that 
of the females is 18.6 years; that is, the females were more than a 
year older than the males. In the United States in 1890 the males 
were four-fifths of a year older and in Cuba in 1899 more than eight- 
een months older than the females. Each sex in Porto Rico was much 
younger than the corresponding sex in Cuba or the United States. 



54 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OE PORTO RICO, 1899. 



The greater age of females is elucidated by the following table. It 
states the ratio between the total number of each sex in a given quin- 
quennial age group and the total of that sex at all ages. 



Age period. 


Per cent of — 


Excess of— 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


0-4 


16.3 
15.4 
13.8 
9.1 
8.8 
8.4 
6.6 
5.1 
4.7 
2.9 
3.4 
1.8 
1.8 
0.8 
0.5 
0.2 
0.2 
0.1 
0.1 


15.3 
14.7 
12.3 
10.5 
9.7 
9.3 
6.9 
4.9 
4.6 
2.7 
3.5 
1.5 
2.1 
0.6 
0.7 
0.2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 


1.0 

.7 

1.5 

.2 
.1 
.2 

.3 

.2 




5-9 




10-14 




15-19 


1.4 
.9 
.9 
.3 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40-44 




45-49 


• 


50-54 - 


.1 


55-59 


60-64 


.3 


65-69 


70-74 


.2 


75-79 


80-84 




.1 


85-89.. 


90-94 

95-99 










100+ 








Unknown 








Total 










100.0 


100.0 















From the preceding table it appears that in Porto Rico a much 
larger proportion of the males than of the females are under 15, but 
that this difference is almost entirely offset by the fact that among 
females a much greater proportion are between 15 and 30. The higher 
median age of females is thus due to the disproportionate number of 
males among children and apparently of females among young adults. 
After the age of 30 the proportion of the two sexes remains almost 
the same. It would appear from the table, however, that the propor- 
tion of males is greater in the age periods 55 to 59 and 65 to 69, while 
that of females is greater in the periods 50 to 54, 60 to 64, 70 to 74, 
and 80 to 84. This difference may plausibly be assigned to the greater 
inaccuracy with which the ages of Porto Rican women are returned. 
As already shown, a considerable number belonging outside the period 
including a multiple of ten have been returned as in these periods, and 
this tendency affecting women more powerfully than men has distorted 
in the table the real balance of the sexes during the higher age periods. 
To determine whether this hypothesis is correct the following table 
for the two sexes has been constructed in accordance with the method 
previously explained (p. 50, f.): 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899. 



in " 



3 2 



w?, 




<&&*&' 



Jl 

w 



£' ■'„ .: Hr'' / |o V 

\ ■* A '-" g "" \ t So 

-<0 AlJ>;f fK^ 




RACE. 



55 



Per cent that population in each quinquennial period makes of the arithmetical mean of 
population in the next younger and next older period. 



Age period. 



25-29 
30-34 
35-39 
40-44 
45-49 
50-54 
55-59 
60-64 
65-69 
70-74 
75-79 
80-84 



Males. 


Females. 


108.1 


112. 3 i 


98.4 


96.8 


90.6 


84.7 


117.6 


121.7 


70.2 


66.7 


148.3 


167.5 


67.4 


52.8 


143.1 


195.0 


63.5 


46.5 


114.8 


163. 


62.9 


46.7 


135.8 


198.4 



Inspection of this table shows that, throughout, the females depart 
more widely than the males from the normal of 100 per cent, but that 
this difference between the two sexes, while constant, is comparatively 
slight up to the age of 50 years. Thereafter it is very striking. 

Corroborative evidence may be found in examining which sex was 
more fond of reporting the age as exactly 20. In a stationary popu- 
lation about 20.3 per cent of all persons between 20 and 25 are actually 
20, but in Porto Rico 32. 3 per cent of the males and 34. 8 per cent of 
the females 20-24 reported themselves as 20. This shows that women's 
tendency to answer in round numbers even at this early age is a little 
higher than men's. 

One may safely conclude that erroneous statements of age, at least 
after middle life, are more common among Porto Rican women. 
Where errors of age occur during the later years, they are likely to 
exaggerate the real age. For example, in the United States in 1890, 
among every 100,000 colored, 128 claimed to be 90 years old or more, 
but among every 100,000 native whites of native parents, only 45 
claimed to be 90 or more, yet the whites certainly live longer. As 
elderly Porto Rican women are more prone to report their ages in 
multiples of 10, so they are probably more prone to exaggerate their 
age, and part of the high proportion of women 70 years old or more 
may be thus explained. At the same time, as general experience tes- 
tifies to a somewhat lower mortality of women in civilized countries, 
the greater proportion of women in the later ages may probably be 
accepted as correct, although the census figures exaggerate the 

difference. 

RACE. 

[See Tables V, VII, and IX.] 

With reference to race, the population of Porto Rico is divided by 
the census into two main classes — those who are and those who are not 
pure whites, or Caucasians. 



56 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



The number belonging to each of these two classes is as follows: 



Race. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


White 


589, 426 
363,817 


61.8 
38.2 








Total 


953,248 


100.0 





The word "colored" in the preceding table includes a very few (75) 
Chinese and many persons of mixed white and negro blood, as well as 
the pure negroes. Somewhat more than three-fifths of the population 
of Porto Rico are pure white, and nearly two-fifths are partly or 
entirely negro, in the following table the proportions of white and 
colored in other West India Islands are given for comparison: 



Country or state. 



Jamaica 

Leeward Islands 

St. Vincent 1 

Turks and Caicos 

Barbados 

Bahamas 2 

Bermudas 1 

Porto Rico 

Cuba 





Per cent of — 


Date of 

census. 






White. 


Colored. 


1891 


2.3 


97.7 


1891 


4.0 


96.0 


1891 


6.0 


94.0 


1891 


8.1 


91.9 


1891 


8.6 


91.4 


1881 


25.3 


74.7 


1897 


38.4 


61.6 


1899 


61.8 


38.2 


1899 


66.9 


33.1 



1 According to Statesman's Year-Book for 1899. 



- Figures for race not given in census of 1891. 



These are all the West India islands for which the facts regarding 
race were accessible. The table shows that the two islands of Cuba 
and Porto Rico are exceptional in having a majority of whites. In all 
others the colored are more numerous, and in all except the Bermudas 
and Bahamas, both of which lie north of the sugar-producing islands, 
they are at least ten times more numerous than the whites. The other 
West India islands have a far smaller proportion of whites than any 
American state, but there are several American states with a smaller 
proportion of whites in 1890 than Porto Rico had in 1899. They are 
as follows: 



States with smaller proportion of whites than Porto Rico. 



South Carolina 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Georgia 

Alabama 

Florida 

Virginia 

Porto Rico 



Per cent of 
whites in 
total pop- 
ulation. 



40.1 
42.3 
49.9 
53.3 
55.1 
57.5 
61.6 
61.8 



All the American coast states from Virginia to Louisiana, inclusive, 
except North Carolina, had a smaller proportion of whites than Porto 
Rico. 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899 




4 V fi"-*g3 



<?. s. 






Mi 









S > 



j fe-' 



t £ 




J 






000 



>*" — £w r -- ^- J -- 



S o 

3 i _j ^ 

°o H > 

Z Q — 

is o 

o 



O -o 

o 




RACE. 



57 



The best collection of information regarding the numerical relations 
of the races at earlier periods has been found in Delitsch's article on 
Porto Rico, and from that source, eked out wherever possible by official 
censuses, the following table has been prepared: 



Date of return. 


Total popu- 
lation. 


White. 


Colored. 


Per cent of — 


Whites. 


Colored. 


1802 


163, 192 
183, 014 
230, 622 
302, 672 
323, 838 
357, 086 
583, 308 
731, 648 
798, 565 
890, 911 
953, 243 


78, 281 
85, 662 
102, 432 
150, 311 
162, 311 
188, 869 
i 300, 406 
411,712 
474, 933 
573, 187 
589, 426 


84, 911 
97, 352 
128, 190 
152, 361 
161,527 
168, 217 
282, 775 
319, 936 
323, 632 
317, 724 
363, 817 


48.0 
46.8 
44.4 
49.7 
50.1 
52.9 
51.5 
56.3 
59.5 
64.3 
61.8 


52.0 
53.2 
55.6 
50.3 
49.9 
47.1 
48.5 
43.7 
40.5 
35.7 
38.2 


1812 

1820 


1827 


1830. . 


1836 


1860 . 


1877 


1887... 


1897 


1899 









1 Including 127 whose race was not stated. 

The proportion of whites was lowest and of colored highest about 
1820, when only four-ninths of the population was white. Since that 
time the proportion of whites has tended upward, although not with 
entire regularity. Probably in Porto Rico, as in Cuba and the United 
States, the accuracy of the enumeration has varied. When omissions 
occur, they are usually more numerous among the colored than among 
whites. The irregularities in the preceding series of percentages may 
flow, therefore, from the varying accuracy of the several censuses. 
Still the general trend of the figures probably reflects a real change in 
the population whereby the proportion of whites has risen in eighty 
years from four-ninths to three-fifths of the population. 

But in considering the amount and presumably the influence of white 
blood in Porto Rico, attention should not be confined to the persons of 
pure white blood. Many of those ranked as colored have some degree 
of white blood in their veins. Perhaps the best statistical measure 
of this is the ratio that the persons of mixed blood bear to the total 
colored. By the last census five-sixths (83.6 per cent) of the total col- 
ored were returned as of mixed blood. Figures regarding race blend- 
ing can never be obtained with close accuracy by a census, and the 
results of an effort in this direction are always to be received with 
reserve. Yet the broad results in this case are probably of some value 
and may fairly be set beside the results of similar inquiries in the 
other West India islands and in the United States, as is done in the 
following table: 



Country. 



St. Vincent 1 

United States 

Leeward Islands . 

Jamaica 

Barbados 

Turks and Caicos 

Cuba 

Porto Kico 









Per cent 


Date of 


Total 


of mixed 


of mixed 


census. 


colored. 


blood. 


blood. 


1891 


31, 559 


554 


1.8 


1890 


7,638,360 


1,132,060 


14.8 


1891 


122, 653 


23, 320 


19.0 


1891 


621, 176 


121,955 


19.6 


1891 


166, 693 


43, 976 


26.4 


1891 


4,397 


1,369 


31.1 


1899 


520, 400 


270, 805 


62.0 


1899 


363, 817 


304, 352 


83.6 



i Figures from Statesman's Year-Book, 1899. 



58 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



In Porto Rico five-sixths of the colored appear or claim to have 
white blood also in their veins. In Cuba this is true of only half the 
colored population; in Jamaica, of one-fifth; in the United States, of 
one-seventh. This statistical evidence, reenf orced as it is by.the testi- 
mony of competent witnesses, probably warrants one in believing 
that persons of mixed blood are more numerous in Cuba and Porto 
Rico than in the other West Indies or in the United States, and more 
numerous in Porto Rico than in Cuba. 

The following table gives the proportion of mixed to total colored 
for those censuses for which the facts are obtainable: 



Date of return. 


Total 

colored 

population. 


Mulattoes. 


Per cent 
mulattoes. 


1802 1 


71,578 
79, 806 
106, 460 
120, 487 
127, 287 
319, 936 
323, 632 
317, 724 
363, 817 


55, 164 

63, 983 

86, 269 

95, 430 

100, 430 

240, 701 

246, 647 

241,900 

304, 352 


77.1 
80.2 
81.0 
79.2 
78.9 
75.2 
76.2 
76.1 
83.6 


18121 


18201 


18271 


18301 


1877 


1887 


1897 


1899 





i Figures from Flinter's State of Puerto Rico, p. 206. They apply only to the free colored, not to the 
slaves. 

Throughout the century from three-fourths to five-sixths of the 
free colored in Porto Rico have had or claimed the blood of both 
races in their veins. Even if we assume that in 1802 all the 13,333 
slaves in Porto Rico were of pure negro blood, still the mulattoes 
would have been two-thirds (65 per cent) of the total colored. The 
percentage column suggests that the proportion of mulattoes may 
have increased since 1877; but examination of the absolute figures 
shows an apparent increase in the two years 1897-1899 of 16,239 whites, 
and, with a smaller initial population, of 46,093 colored. The increase 
of colored was the balance of an increase of 62,152 mulattoes and a 
decrease of 16,509 negroes. That in two years whites should have 
increased 2.8 per cent and mulattoes 25.8 per cent, while negroes 
decreased 21.6 per cent, flies in the face of statistical probabilities. 
It is simpler and more likely to suppose that a certain number of col- 
ored persons who escaped enumeration in 1897 were enumerated in 
1899 and that others who were enumerated as negroes in 1897 were 
returned in 1899 as mulattoes. 1 On the whole, therefore, no inference 
regarding the relative increase of mulattoes during the century can 
be drawn with confidence from the preceding table. Yet what indi- 
cations it affords point to a secular change whereby the pure negro 
blood has lost ground before the mixed, as the two together have 
apparently lost ground before the whites. 

In the following table the number and proportion of whites and of 

1 Compare p. 85, f . 



RACE. 



59 



colored in each department at the present census is stated. In order 
to call attention to the geographical distribution of the two races, the 
departments are arranged in the order ot decreasing proportion of 
whites: 



Department. 



Aguadilla . 

Arecibo 

Mayaguez . 

Ponce 

Guayama . . 
Bayamon . . 
Humacao.. 

Total 



Absolute number of- 



White. 



85,298 
125, 059 
82,044 
121, 187 
56, 805 
78, 228 
40, 805 



589, 426 



Colored. 



14, 347 
37, 249 
45, 522 
82, 004 
55, 181 
81, 818 
47, 696 



363, 817 



Percentages of- 



White. Colored. 



85.6 
77.1 
64.3 
59.6 
50.7 
48.9 
46.1 



61.8 



14.4 
22.9 
35.7 
40.4 
49.3 
51.1 
53.9 



38.2 



To one who is familiar with the location of these departments, it is 
clear that the proportion of whites is greatest in the western depart- 
ments and decreases toward the east. In Aguadilla the proportion of 
whites is about the same as in Kentucky, while at the eastern end 
of Porto Rico it is about the same as in Louisiana. In general the 
proportion of whites is greater also in the northern departments. As 
one passes from west to east or from north to south the proportion 
of colored increases. 

If the 69 municipal districts be divided into two classes, the 40 which 
touch the seacoast and the 29 which do not, and the average proportion 
of whites in each class be computed, it appears that in the 29 interior 
districts the whites make up 66.3 per cent of the population; but in the 
40 coast districts they are only 58.8 per cent. As the inland districts 
are usually the upland and cooler districts, it seems that the whites are 
somewhat more numerous relatively in the cooler parts of the island. 

In San Juan the proportion of whites (47.6 per cent) is much larger 
than in the neighboring municipal districts of Rio Piedras (38.0 per 
cent), or Carolina (39.1 per cent), but a little less than in Bayamon 
(51.1 per cent). In the other two large cities, Mayaguez and Ponce, 
the proportion of whites in the city is noticeably less than in the 
remainder of the municipal district embracing the city. 



City. 


Per cent of whites. 


In city. 


In rest of 
district. 




59.8 
55.3 


68.2 
62.2 







Apparently the colored are somewhat massed in the cities. The 
difference in this regard between the capital and the other two cities 
may be due to the large number of foreign-born whites in San Juan. 1 



1 2,873 as compared with 754 in Mayaguez and 1,182 in Ponce. See p. 189. 



60 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



RACE AND SEX. 



The following table shows the proportions of the sexes in the two 
races and for the three classes of colored distinguished by the census: 



Race. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Per cent in Cuba. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Whites 


294, 195 

178, 066 

29, 122 

148, 878 

66 


295, 231 

185, 751 

30, 268 

155, 474 

9 


49.9 
48.9 
49.0 
48.9 
88.0 


50.1 
51.1 
51.0 
51.1 
12.0 


53.5 
48.4 
47.7 
46.3 
98.9 


46.5 
51.6 
52.3 
53.7 
1.1 








Total 


472, 261 


480, 982 


49.5 


50.5 


51.8 


48.2 





There is a slight excess of females over males in Porto Rico, a numeri- 
cal relation much the same as in several American states along the 
Atlantic seaboard — e. g., New Hampshire, Connecticut, New York, 
Maryland — but quite different from that in Cuba. This excess of 
females is most marked among the persons of mixed blood. The same 
is true in Cuba, but with both the negro and the mixed the sexes are 
much nearer to an equality in numbers in Porto Rico. 

RACE AND AGE. 

In analyzing the figures for age the term median age was explained 
and the method of computing it set forth (p. 46). This concept enables 
one to state summarily the difference in age between the two races as 
in the following table. For purposes of comparison the figures for 
Cuba and the United States are included. 

Median age. 



Race. 


Porto 
Rico. 


Cuba. 


United 
States 

(1890). 


White 


18.3 

17.8 


20. 5 
21.6 


22.4 
18.3 







The table shows that the extreme youth of the population of Porto 
Rico already mentioned (p. 47) is true of both races. The whites of 
Porto Rico are about two years younger than those in Cuba and four 
years younger than those in the United States. The colored in Porto 
Rico are but little younger than those in the United States, half a year, 
but nearly four years younger than those in Cuba, where, b} r a curious 
anomaly, the colored are older than the whites. Although this is not 
the place to dwell on the Cuban figures, it may be mentioned in pass- 
ing that the aged Chinese and African immigrants in Cuba are the 
main if not the entire cause of the anomaly. 

Where a race or social class maintains itself by excess of births over 
deaths, or natural increase rather than by immigration or transfer 
from other social classes, there a low median age is an indication of 



RACE. 



61 



low vitality and a short life. Where the population is growing with 
abnormal rapidity this inference may fail, but that explanation does 
not hold in Porto Rico. 

In the following table the age composition of the two races is indi- 
cated for Porto Rico, Cuba, and the United States by five-year 
periods: 

Per cent of total pojndation of specified race in age period named. 



Age period. 


Porto Rico. 


Cuba. 


United States. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Colored. 


0-4 


15.8 
14.8 
12.9 
9.8 
9.4 
8.9 
6.9 
5.1 
4.7 
2.8 
3.4 
1.6 
1.9 
0.7 
0.6 
0.2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 


15.8 
15.4 
13.3 
9.8 
9.1 
8.7 
6.5 
4.8 
4.6 
2.7 
3.6 
1.6 
2.0 
0.7 
• 0.7 
0.2 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 


8.2 

14.6 

14.2 

11.7 

10.4 

9.2 

7.9 

6.6 

5.4 

3.7 

3.1 

1.9 

1.6 

0.7 

0.5 

0.2 

0.1 


8.5 
14.0 
13.5 
10.7 
8.5 
7.7 
6.9 
5.8 
5.5 
4.0 
4.7 
2.7 
3.4 
1.3 
1.3 
0.4 
0.6 
0.1 
0.2 
0.1 
0.1 


12.0 
11.8 
10.9 
10.3 
9.9 
8.5 
7.6 
6.3 
5.2 
4.5 
3.8 
2.8 
2.4 
1.7 
1.2 
0.7 
0.3 
0.1 


13.9 
14.5 
13.7 
11.6 
9.8 
7.7 
5.7 
5.6 
4.2 
3.7 
3.1 
1.9 
1.8 
1.1 
0.8 
0.4 
0.3 
0.1 
0.1 


5-9 


10-14 


15-19 

20-24 


25-29 

30-34 


35-39 


40-44 


45-49 


50-54 


55-59 . . 


60-64 

65-69 


70-74 


75-79 

80-84 


85-89 

90-94 


95-99 . . . 






100 + 




















Total 














100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



From the preceding table it appears that below the age of 20 in 
Porto Rico the colored are more numerous, but from that age to 50 
the whites, and in old age, apparently, again the colored. Conceive 
two groups, one of 10,000 whites, the other of 10,000 colored, and of 
age distribution the same as that of the average in Porto Rico for these 
two races. The negro group would have 108 more children under 15, 
and 17 more elderly persons over 50. The white group would have 
125 more between 15 and 50, or in the productive years of life. If we 
assume that these answers are correct and that persons under 15 and 
over 65 are dependent for support upon persons between those years, 
then under present Porto Rican conditions 1.000 self-supporting 
whites, men and women, must maintain on the average 837 young 
and old of the same race, while 1,000 colored must maintain 874, or 37 
more dependents, the difference being due almost entirely to the larger 
proportion of children among the colored. 

The preceding table also shows by the concentration upon 50, 60, 
70, 80, and 90 that the colored in their answers report their ages more 
often than the whites as multiples of ten, and therefore are more inac- 
curate in their statements of age. The greater proportion of colored 
above the age of 50, as shown in the tables, is probably an error. The 
colored men and women, being more inaccurate in their statements of 



62 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

age, are more prone to exaggerate it when past middle life, and this 
tendency more than offsets the probably smaller proportion of colored 
in the later years. 

NATIVITY. 

[See Tables V, VII, X, and XI.] 

The number of foreign born returned by the census is 13,872, or 
about 1.5 per cent of the total population. There are few regions in 
the Western Hemisphere in which the proportion of natives is so high 
and that of the foreign born so low. Even the southern portion of 
the United States as a whole had a greater proportion of foreign born, 
although eight of these states had a proportion slightly smaller than 
Porto Rico. In the other West Indies the proportion of foreign born 
ranged from 2 per cent in the Barbados to nearly 45 per cent in 
Trinidad, while in Cuba it was about seven times as great as in Porto 
Rico. 

Of the total foreign born, 11,422 were white, constituting 1.9 per 
cent of all the whites, and 2,450 were colored, or 0.6 per cent of all 
the colored. 

Of the total number of foreigners, 5,935, or 43 per cent, were found 
in the three cities of San Juan, Ponce, and Mayaguez, thus illustrat- 
ing upon this island the general tendency of foreigners toward the 
cities. 

Of the total foreign born, 7,690, or 55 per cent, decidedly more than 
one-half, were born in Spain. These were nearly all of the white race. 
The whole of Spanish America contributed 1,542, of which 1,194 came 
from the West India islands. The United States contributed 1,069. 
From Africa were reported 427, of which 258 were colored. This is 
probably the last remnant of the imported slaves. China was repre- 
sented by but 68 persons. 

MALES OF VOTING AGE. 

[See Table XII.] 

This table presents the potential voters of Porto Rico, classified 
by race, by country of birth, and by literacy, with a view of determin- 
ing the effect upon them of making the ability to read and write a con- 
dition of the elective franchise. 

The element of foreign birth in Porto Rico is trifling in number 
and proportion and is quite uniformly distributed. Among the males 
of voting age only 3.8 per cent were of alien birth, 2.8 per cent being 
Spanish. 

The classification by birthplace and by citizenship shows that the two 
are practically identical. The people born in Spain or other countries 
and living on the island have, with few exceptions, retained their 
alien citizenship. On these accounts it is deemed unnecessary to pub- 



CITIZENSHIP. 



63 



lish the extended and complicated tables required to present citizenship 
as well as birthplace. 

In the following tables the males over 21 are classified as white and 
colored, and the whites as born in Porto Rico, born in Spain, and born 
in other countries. Each of these groups is then classified under the 
following heads: 

Can neither read nor write. 

Can read but can not write. 

Can read and write. 

With superior education. 
In the following discussion it is to be understood that illiterates are 
those who can neither read nor write, the remainder being regarded as 
literates. 

The males of voting age in Porto Rico numbered 201,071. Classified 
by birthplace and race, they were as follows: 



Race and birthplace. 


Number. 


Per cent. 




120, 295 
5,662 
2, 104 
73, 010 


59.8 
2.8 
1.1 

36.3 











Of the whites of Porto Rican birth 35,397 were literate, forming 
29.4 per cent of all this class. Of the colored, 12,576 could read, or 
17.2 per cent of all the colored. Under this educational qualification, 
therefore, the number of those entitled to vote in the island would be 
47,973, or 25 per cent of the native males of voting age and 24 
per cent of all males of voting age. Thus the suffrage would be 
restricted to about one-fourth of the males of voting age. 

The effect of such a provision upon the people of the several depart- 
ments is next to be considered. The following table shows the per- 
centage of males over 21 years of age in each department, classified 
by birthplace and race: 

Percentages of males 21 + by nativity and race. 



Department. 



Aguadilla 
Arecibo... 
Bayamon. 
Guayama. 
Humacao. 
Mayaguez 
Ponce 





White. 




Colored. 


Total 
native of 

both 
# races. 


Native. 


Spanish. 


Other 
foreign. 


84.5 


2.0 


0.5 


13.0 


97.5 


74.2 


2.6 


0.4 


22.8 


97.0 


44.2 


5.6 


2.1 


48.1 


92.3 


50.9 


2.1 


0.5 


46.5 


97.4 


45.5 


1.5 


0.7 


52.3 


97.8 


63.1 


2.5 


1.0 


33.4 


96.5 


57.4 


2.3 


1.5 


38.8 


96.2 



The last column is formed by the addition of columns 1 and 4 on the 
assumption that all the colored are natives, an assumption which is 
very nearly correct. 



64 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



It is seen that the whites of Porto Rican birth ranged from 44.2 per 
cent in Bayamon up to 84.5 in Aguadilla; that the persons of Spanish 
birth ranged from 1.5 per cent in Humacao up to 5.6 per cent in Baya- 
mon, and that persons of other foreign birth ranged from 0.4 per cent 
in Arecibo up to 2.1 per cent in Bayamon. The high percentage of 
persons of Spanish and other foreign birth in this department is due 
to the fact, of course, that it contains the large and important commer- 
cial city of San Juan. The colored ranged from 13 per cent in Agua- 
dilla up to 52.3 per cent in Humacao, the latter department having four 
times as many proportionally as the former. Including the colored, 
the proportion of males of voting age who were of native birth was 
smallest in Bayamon, where it was 92.3 per cent, and highest in Huma- 
cao, where it was 97. 8 per cent. With the exception of Bayamon, no 
department contains more than 3.8 per cent of foreign born, Ponce 
containing this proportion, Mayaguez 3.5, while the other provinces 
contain less than 3 per cent each. 

The following table shows in each department the number of native 
white and of colored literates, with the proportion Avhich they bear to 
the total among males 21 years of age. 

Number and proportion of literates. 



Department. 


Literate native 
whites. 


Literate colored. 


Literate 
foreign 
whites. 


Per cent 

of literates 

to all 

males of 
voting age. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Aguadilla 


3,684 
5, 648 
5, 205 
3,664 
2, 487 
6,179 
8,530 


21.0 
22.4 
35.5 
32.0 
30.0 
35.0 
33.4 


539 
979 
3,303 
1,289 
1,240 
1,968 
3, 258 


20.1 
12.6 
20.7 
12.3 
12.9 
21.1 
18.9 


443 
816 

2,394 
549 
365 
864 

1,533 


23 
22 
33 
24 
22 
32 
30 


Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 





We see that among the native whites the proportion of literates to 
all native white males of voting age ranged from 20.5 per cent in 
Aguadilla up to 35.5 per cent in Bayamon. Aguadilla and Arecibo 
seem to be together with a low percentage of literates, all the other 
departments containing 30 or more per cent in that class. 

Among the colored the smallest percentage of literates was found in 
the department of Guayama, where it was 12.3 per cent; or, in other 
words, fewer than 1 in 8 could read. From this it ranged up to 21.1 
per cent in Mayaguez, at the west end of the island. Here rather 
more than 1 in 5 were able to read. 

The fifth column presents the number of literates among those born 
in Spain and other countries. These figures are given for the pur- 
pose of comparison with the literates of native birth, and show that 
the latter far outnumber them. Indeed, the only department in which 
the native literates were not many times as numerous as the foreign 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



65 



born was Bayamon, and here the latter were outnumbered in the pro- 
portion of 3.5 to 1. 

The last column gives the proportion which the number of actual 
voters will bear under a literacy qualification to the total number of 
native males over 21 years of age. This per cent ranges from 22 
in Arecibo and Humacao up to 33 in Bayamon, which department, 
therefore, has the proud distinction of possessing the smallest propor- 
tion of illiterates among its native population. 

In the cities of San Juan and Ponce is concentrated a considerable 
part of the foreign element of the island, and here, if anywhere, will 
the restriction of the suffrage to literates give the foreign born an 
advantage. It is well, therefore, to examine the conditions in these 
two cities. The following table shows in the cities of San Juan and 
Ponce the number of males 21 years of age and over who could read 
among the white natives of the island, the whites of Spanish birth, 
the whites born in other countries, and the colored. 



Race and birthplace. 



Native white 

Spanish born 

Born in other countries 
Colored 



San Juan 

literates. 



1,926 

1,100 

592 

1,822 



Ponce lit- 
erates. 



2,190 
409 



It appears that in the city of San Juan the native whites and the 
colored each outnumbered the foreign element, while together they 
outnumbered them nearly 2.5 to 1. In Ponce this proportion was even 
greater, the native whites being more than three times and the colored 
twice as numerous as the foreign element. 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 

[See Tables XIII-XVI.] 

The census schedules classified the population as regards conjugal 
condition into three groups — single, married, and widowed. Since the 
Roman Catholic Church does not permit divorces, the class of divorced 
persons is not represented. 

There is, however, another class represented in Porto Rico, as in 
Cuba, which consists of persons living together in the conjugal rela- 
tion without religious or legal sanction. This class, which is large not 
only in these islands but in much of Spanish America, probably owes 
its existence to the fact that throughout these countries the only legal 
authority for sanctioning marriage is the Catholic Church, and the 
expense attendant upon the wedding ceremony has caused it to be 
waived in large numbers of cases. Such unions by mutual consent, 
while commonly regarded in the United States as binding, have not been 
so regarded in Porto Rico, Cuba, or other parts of Spanish America. 
8190—00 5 



66 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



and the children resulting therefrom are regarded as illegitimate. An 
attempt has been made to distinguish and tabulate the members of 
such unions, and while the results are probably below the truth, they 
are believed to be valuable, at least as indicating the minimum number 
of this class. 

The population of Porto Rico, as regards conjugal condition, was 
distributed as follows among these four classes, expressed in percent- 
ages of the total number of inhabitants of the island: 

Single 69. 7 

Married 16. 6 

Living together by mutual consent 8. 8 

Widowed - 4. 9 



100. 



THE SINGLE. 



Of the total population of Porto Rico nearly seven-tenths (69.7 per 
cent) were single. This proportion, which is exceedingly large, is 
comprised in great part of children. Excluding them from considera- 
tion and considering only that portion of the population which is 15 
years of age and over, it is found that 45.9 per cent of what may be 
thus regarded as the adult population were single. Including those 
living together by mutual consent among the single, the percentage 
of single among those over 15 years of age was increased to 61.7 per 
cent. These proportions also are exceedingly large — much greater 
than in most countries of the earth. The corresponding proportion 
in the United States in 1890 was 36.9 per cent. 

The following table gives the corresponding proportion in most of 
the leading countries of the earth: 



Country. 



Hungary 1 

Mexico 

France 

Italy 

Denmark 

United States 

Germany 

England and Wales . 

Austria 

Sweden 

Netherlands 

Switzerland 

Belgium 

Turks Island 

Guatemala 2 

Scotland , 





Per cent 




of single 


census. 


to popu- 
lation 




15+. 


1890 


23.2 


1895 


34.9 


1886 


35.3 


1881 


36.5 


1890 


36.7 


1890 


36.9 


1890 


38.3 


1891 


39.6 


L890 


40.4 


1890 


40.7 


1889 


40.8 


1888 


42.8 


1890 


43.9 


1891 


43.9 


1893 


44.7 


1891 


45.2 



Country. 



Chile 

Porto Rico 3 

New Zealand 

Costa Rica 

Argentina 

Queensland 

Ireland 

British Honduras . 

Cuba* 

Leeward Islands . . 

Barbados 

Porto Pico* 

Trinidad 6 

Cuba* 

Martinique 





Per cent 




of single 


census. 


to popu- 
lation 




15+. 


1885 


45.3 


1899 


45.9 


1891 


46.4 


1892 


47.5 


1895 


47.9 


1891 


48.3 


1891 


50.8 


1891 


51.4 


1899 


53.4 


1891 


57.7 


1891 


61.5 


1899 


61.7 


1891 


63.5 


1899 


66.6 


1894 


78.5 



1 Population 16+ is the basis. 
- Population 14+ is the basis. 

3 Excluding persons living together by mutual consent. 

4 Including persons living together by mutual consent. 
6 Excluding the East Indians. 

Throughout the following discussion the persons living in consensual 
unions, as well as the married and widowed, will be excluded from the 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899. 



PORTO RICO 

CONJUGAL CONDITION BY RACE, SEX AND AGE 
WHITES 







MALES 
















FEMALES 






























































































i 














































































1 1 


























I 


I 


1 1 


























































i 







AGE GROUPS 

65 ami over 



55-64 



30-34 

25-29 
2024 

15-19 



COLORED 



MALES 



LTJ 



LIVING TOGETHER 



WIDOWED 



FEMALES 






AGE GROUPS 

65 and over 
55-64 

45-54 

35-44 

30-34 
25-29 
20-24 
15-19 



A.Hoen&Co.Balto Lith. 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



67 



single. Furthermore, the discussion will be confined, its regards 
nativity, to the native white and the colored elements, since the foreign 
whites form so small a proportion of the population as to be practically 
negligible. 

The following table shows the proportion of single among the native 
white males and females and the colored males and females: 

Per cent. 

Native whites 68. 6 

Male 71. 5 

Female 65. 8 

Colored 72. 1 

Male 73. 6 

Female 70. 6 

As is seen, the males were relatively in excess in both races, and 
among the whites to a great extent. 

The following tables show the distribution of the single by age, sex, 
and race, expressed in percentages of the total number of persons in 
the several age groups: 

Percentages of single. 



Age group. 


Native white. 


Colored. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


15-19 


98.5 
82.1 
49.8 
29.9 
19.5 
13.7 
10.2 
8.6 


88.7 
54.9 
33.4 
24.9 
19.5 
17.1 
16.2 
16.0 


98.1 
80.0 
51.6 
34.9 
24.7 
20.1 
16.5 
19.1 


89.1 
61.1 
41.9 
36.4 
31.1 
30.6 
32.4 
36.2 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-44 


45-54 


55-64 


65+ 





At the same ages the proportion of single among the males was, in the 
earlier years, greater than among the females. This extended among 
the whites up to the age of 35, beyond which the proportion of single 
females became the greater. Among the colored it extended to the 
age of 30, beyond which the proportion among the females was greater. 

Among the native whites, both males and females, the proportion 
of single diminished steadily through all ages, but among the colored 
it reached a minimum and then increased again. This minimum was 
reached among colored males at the age period of 55 to 64 years, and 
among females at the age period of 45 to 54 years. This phenomenon 
is doubtless due to the fact, as will appear hereafter, that consensual 
unions are much more common among the colored than among the 
whites, and that when such unions cease by the death of one or the 
other member the remaining member is placed among the single instead 
of being regarded as widowed. 

The distribution of the single among the several departments of 
Porto Rico shows great uniformity, the proportion of the single to 
the total population ranging from 68.5 up to 71.5 per cent, the latter 



68 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



proportion being found in the department of Bay anion, which includes 
the city of San Juan. 
The following table shows the percentages in the several departments: 

Percentage of single. 



Aguadilla 68. 5 

Arecibo 68. 5 

Bayainon 71.5 

Guayama 69. 9 



Humacao 69. 8 

Mayaguez 68. 4 

Ponce 70.3 



The fact that the department of Bayamon contained a larger propor- 
tion of single than any other of the seven departments indicates that 
the proportion of single was greater in urban than in rural districts. 
That this is true is shown by the fact that in the largest three cities of 
Porto Rico, taken collectively, the proportion of single was 71 per cent, 
while in the remainder of the island, which may be regarded as rural 
districts, the proportion was 69.6 per cent. 



THE MARRIED. 

In this discussion two groups of married persons will be considered: 
One, those legally married under the forms of the church; the other, 
the consensual unions already referred to. These will be discussed 
both together and separately. 

The proportion which the legally married bore to the total popula- 
tion was 16.6 per cent, or about one-sixth. The proportion of the 
inhabitants who were associated in consensual unions was 8.8 per cent, 
or a little more than one-half of those legally married. Hence the 
proportion of those living together in the marriage relation was 25.4 
per cent. This is a very small proportion, smaller than in any Euro- 
pean country and much smaller than in the United States in 1890, 
where it was not less than 35.7 per cent. 

The following table shows the proportion of those married and of 
those living together by mutual consent and their sum, in each of the 
seven departments of the island: 



Department. 



Aguadilla 
Arecibo... 
Bayamon. 
Guayama. 
Humacao. 
Mayaguez 
Ponce 



Married. 



20.8 
19.1 
15.2 
15.2 
13.5 
17.7 
15.2 



Living 
together 
by mutual 
consent. 



6.4 
7.3 
8.8 
10.4 
12.3 
8.2 
9.9 



Sum of 
two. 



26.2 
26.4 
24.0 
25.6 
25.8 
25.9 
25.1 



Thus it appears that while there was c msiderable variation in the 
proportion of married in the several departments, ranging from 13.5 
per cent in Humacao up to 20. 8 in Aguadilla, these differences are very 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



69 



nearly offset by corresponding- differences in the proportion of those 
living together by mutual consent, which range from 5.4 in Aguadilla, 
where the proportion of married was greatest, up to 12.3 in Humacao, 
where the proportion of married was least, making the figures in the 
fourth column, which express the proportion of those living together 
under the legal sanction of marriage, together with those living 
together b}^ mutual consent, very nearly the same in all the depart- 
ments. Furthermore, it will be noted that those departments in which 
the proportion of all the married was the smallest, namely, Bayamon and 
Ponce, were those containing the only two large cities of the island, San 
Juan and Ponce. This difference between the urban and rural parts 
of the island is, furthermore, brought out in the statement that, while 
the proportion of married in the three cities of San Juan, Ponce, and 
Mayaguez, together, is 14. 6, in the rest of the island, which may be 
regarded as a rural region, the corresponding proportion was 16.8, while 
the proportion of those living together by mutual consent was the same 
in both the cities and the rural districts. 

Classified by race, it appears that the proportion of those legally 
married was greater, and of those living in consensual unions was less, 
among the whites than among the colored, while the proportion of the 
two classes together was somewhat larger among the whites than among 
the colored, as appears in the following table: 



Race. 


Married. 


In consen- 
sual 
unions. 


Total. 




19.1 
12.0 


7.0 
11.8 


26.1 
23.8 







It appears, furthermore, from the above that the proportions .of 
married and of those living together among the colored were very 
nearly equal. 

Classifying the married and those living in consensual unions by sex, 
as well as by race, shows the following results, expressed in percent- 
ages of the total number of each class: 



Race and Sex. 


Married. 


In consen- 
sual 
unions. 


Both. 


Native white: 

Male 


18.6 
19.5 

12.4 
11.7 


7.1 

7.0 

11.8 
11.7 


25.7 
26.5 1 

24.2 
23.4 


Female 


Colored: 

Male 


Female 





Thus it appears that the proportion of the married among the white 
females was somewhat larger than among the males, while those in con- 
sensual unions were about equal. Among the colored there was no 
decided difference in either class. 



70 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Classified by age, as well as race and sex, the following results appear 



Race, sex, and age. 



Native white males: 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65+ years 

Native white females: 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65+ years 

Colored males: 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65+ years 

Colored females: 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65+ years 



Married. 



0.6 
10.0 
31.3 
46.2 
54.1 
59.6 
60.5 
54.4 

6.8 
28.9 
43.5 
48.5 
50.0 
42.0 
30.0 
17.1 

0.5 
6.8 
19.1 
29.7 
35.1 
42.3 
46.8 
42.5 

4.3 
15.4 
24.2 
27.0 
29.7 
29.0 
21.6 
12.4 



In consen- 
sual 
unions. 



0.9 
7.4 
17.4 
21.2 
21.2 
16.1 
10.1 
6.0 

4.4 

15.0 

19.6 

19.1 

14.1 

7.0 

2.8 

1.1 

1.3 

12.9 
28.4 
33.4 
36.2 
28.8 
21.6 
14.6 

6.4 
22.6 
31.6 
31.6 
26.8 
14.5 
7.8 
2.8 



Both. 



1.5 
17.4 
48.7 
67.4 
75.3 
75.7 
70.6 
60.4 

11.2 
43.9 
63.1 
67.6 
64.1 
49.0 
32.8 
18.2 

1.8 
19.7 
47.5 
63.1 
71.3 
71.1 
68.4 
57.1 

10.7 
38.0 
65.8 
58.6 
56.5 
43.5 
29.4 
15.2 



Thus it appears that among the native white males the maximum 
proportion of married occurred in the age group between 55 and 64 
years, where it reached three-fifths of the whole number, while among 
those living together by mutual consent the maximum occurred about 
the age of 35 years. Among the native white females the maximum 
proportion of married occurred between the ages of 35 and 44 years, 
where one-half of this class were married. The subsequent diminution 
in the proportion of this class is explained by the increase in the pro- 
portion of widowed, as will be shown later. The maximum propor- 
tion of those living together by mutual consent occurred between the 
ages of 35 and 44 years, where it reached one-fifth of the total number. 

Among colored males the maximum proportion occurred, as among 
the white males, between the ages of 55 and 64, and the maximum 
among those living together by mutual consent between 35 and 44 
years. Among the colored females the maximum among the married 
was found between 35 and 44 years, and of those living together by 
mutual consent at about the age of 30. 

The map opposite this page shows the proportion which those in con- 
sensual unions bore to the married in various parts of Porto Rico. A 
study of it shows that the consensual unions were relatively most numer- 
ous in the eastern and southeastern parts of the island, especially on 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899. 




CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



71 



the eastern half of the south coast. Of the total number of municipal 
districts in the island, 35 contained a larger proportion of consensual 
unions than the average of the island, and in 9 municipal districts 
consensual unions were more numerous than lawful marriages. 



THE WIDOWED. 

Of the inhabitants of Porto Rico, 4. 9 per cent, or nearly one in twenty, 
were widowed. The proportion of widowed among native whites (5.3 
per cent) was greater than the average of the island, and that of the 
colored (4.1 per cent) considerably less. This is due to the fact, as 
shown above, that consensual unions were more numerous relatively 
among the colored, and that upon the dissolution of such union by the 
death of one of the members the other became classed with single 
rather than with widowed. 

The widowed native white males formed 2.8 per cent only of the 
population, and the widowed native white females not less than 7.7 
per cent. The corresponding figures for the colored were, for males 
4.1, and for females 6 per cent. 

The following table shows the distribution of the widowed by race, 
sex, and age: 



Age period. 



15 to 19 years , 
20 to 24 years . 
25 to 29 years . 
30 to 34 years . 
35 to 44 years . 
45 to 54 years . 
55 to 64 years . 
65+ years 



Native 
white 
males. 



0.4 
1.5 
2.7 
5.2 
10.6 
19.2 
30.6 



Native 

white 

females. 



0.1 

1.1 

3.5 

7.5 

16.4 

33.9 

51.0 

65.7 



Colored 
males. 



0.1 
0.2 
0.9 
1.9 
4.0 
8.8 
15.1 
23.8 



Colored 
females. 



0.2 
0.9 
2.3 
5.0 
12.4 
25.9 
38.1 
48.5 



As will be seen, the proportion of widowed increased steadily with 
advancing age among all classes. It reached in the native white males 
30. 6 per cent at the oldest age, and among the colored males 23. 8 per 
cent, while among females it reached 65.7 per cent among the native 
whites and 48.5 per cent among the colored. There was here, there- 
fore, as elsewhere, a much larger proportion of widowed among 
females than among males. This excess is in part due to the fact that 
the death rate is greater as an average, among married couples, with 
men than with women, on account of the greater average age of the 
husband, and in part to the fact that more men remarry than women, 
and, to a considerable extent at least, select single women rather than 
widows. 

EDUCATION. 

As far as history throws any light on the subject, it would appear 
that prior to the year 1799 there were no schools in Porto Rico, outside 
of the cities of San Juan and San German, which had free schools for 
girls, where needlework and the catechism of the Catholic Church were 



72 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

taught, a class in philosophy established by the Dominican monks, and 
a few private schools attended by the children of the wealthier citizens. 

During the next forty years a number of private schools and a few 
colleges were opened, but it was not until 1845 that public primary 
schools were provided for. For a full account of education in Porto 
Rico the reader is referred to Senate Document 363, Fifty-sixth Con- 
gress, publishing the report of Gen. George W. Davis, Military Gov- 
ernor of the island. 

The system was the same as that of Spain, which is fully described 
in the Report of the Census of Cuba. 

On June 30, 1898, there were in existence in Porto Rico 380 public 
schools for boys, 148 for girls, 1 for adults, and 26 private schools, 
having an enrollment of 44,861 pupils. The total amount annually 
expended, including the subsidy granted by the insular government to 
private schools, was 309,810.75 pesos, or $185,886.45. 

At the end of the school year 1899 there were 525 public schools, 
having a total attendance of 21,873 pupils, at a cost of $203,373. The 
number of children of school age at that time without school facilities 
was 268,630. 

Gen. Guy V. Henry, U. S. A., who succeeded General Brooke as 
Military Governor, took an early interest in education, and on May 1 
established a code of school laws which provided for school boards in 
all municipal districts in which schools were in operation and abol- 
ished many of the evils of the Spanish school system, as, for example, 
the payment of fees by parents who could afford it, and the teaching of 
religion and church doctrine. He established a teachers' manual and 
free text-books, graded the schools, and made provision for high 
schools, and the necessary professional schools. 

Under Gen. George W. Davis these laws were carefully revised and 
modified by the introduction of many beneficial changes suggested by 
experience. 

On August 12, 1899, General Davis substituted for the bureau of 
education an insular board of education having general charge of 
public instruction. The first public school building was erected under 
his supervision in 1899 in the city of San Juan. Others will doubtless 
follow as funds become available in the various municipalities. 

As in Cuba, no subject is of greater importance to the inhabitants of 
these islands than the education of the children who will in time be 
called on to perform the duties and assume the full responsibilities of 
citizenship. 

LITERACY. 

[See Tables XVII and XIX.] 

A census can take cognizance of the degree of education of a people 
only as it is indicated by certain simple tests, which refer usually to 
formal or book education, not because that is necessarily the most 



LITERACY. 



73 



important, but because it is the most easily tested. The tests used by 
the present census were attendance at school, ability to read, ability to 
write, and possession of higher education. It is obvious that attend- 
ance at school certifies nothing regarding a person's educational 
attainments, yet if the entire population is to be classed according to 
degree of education some assumption must be made regarding children 
attending school. It can not introduce serious error to give such chil- 
dren the benefit of the doubt and assume that all of them were able to 
read and write, but that all under 10 years of age and not attending 
school were not able to read. On these assumptions the population of 
Porto Rico may be classed as follows: 



Persons in Porto Rico 



Number. 



Per cent 
of total. 



With higher education 

Able to read and write 

Able to read 

Population answering educational questions 



5, 045 
143,472 
158, 852 
951,836 



0.5 
15.0 
16.6 
100.0 



In the preceding table the classes are not mutually exclusive, but 
each succeeding class includes all those in the preceding. From this 
table the following may be derived by taking the differences in the 
successive numbers of the preceding: 



Persons in Porto Rico 



Number. 



Per cent. 



With higher education , 

Able to write, but without higher education 

Able to read, but unable to write , 

Unable to read 

Not stated 

Total 



5,045 
138, 427 
15, 380 
792, 984 

1,407 



953, 243 



0.5 
14.5 
1.6 

83.2 
0.2 



100.0 



From this table it appears that the three classes of those able to 
read, but unable to write, those with higher education, and those not 
answering the educational questions, including together less than one- 
fortieth of the total population, were numerically insignificant. 
Attention, therefore, may be centered on the other two classes. The 
several departments of Porto Rico had the following numbers and 
proportions of persons able to read: 



Department. 



Popula- 
tion. 



Able to read. 



Number. Per cent 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Humacao 

Guayama 

Ponce 

Bayamon 

Mayaguez 

Porto Rico 



99, 645 
162, 308 

88, 501 
111, 986 
203, 191 
160, 046 
127, 566 



953, 243 



12,277 
20, 030 
12, 222 
16, 730 
36, 359 
33, 740 
27, 494 



158, 852 



12.3 
12.3 
13.8 
14.9 

17.8 
21.0 
21.5 



16.6 



74 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

table presents the facte on this point: 




This table shows that in the three cities of Porto Rico about half the 
popu tion are able to read, a proportion nearly four times ti* , ni rto 
rest of the island. Accordingly it seems fairer to compare , the ah ee 
departments containing these cities with the other four odj* 
urban population has been excluded. This is done in the following 

table: 



Department. 


Rural 
popula- 
tion. 


Able to read. 


Number. 1 Percent. 




127, 998 
112, 379 
175, 239 


17,122 13.4 
19,668 17.5 
23,425 13.4 









This table, supplementing that on page 73, shows that outs.de the 
large cities ability to read is much more general in the department of 
Mayagues than in any other, and that next to this come the two 
r p artmcnts at the eastern end of the island, Guayama and Humacao 
white the two northwestern departments Aguadilla and Arec^o have 
the smallest proportion of persons able to read. This result is sui 
prising n that it shows that the departments containing a very high 
Proportion of colored (p. 59) have also a large proportion o« 
while the departments containing the largest proportion of white are 
Those in which illiteracy is most common. From an examination of th 
table showing by departments the proportion ot population living in 
rife of M)00 inhabitants and over (p. «). it appears that those depart- 
J!" with the smallest population able to read are 3-"heon^whmh 
have the smallest proportion of urban population while Guayama has 
after Bayamon, the highest proportion of urban Pg°>*"> » d 
Humacao has a proportion decidedly higher than that for eithe. 
Aguadilla or Areeu/ It seems probable, therefore, that the proper- 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



75 



tion of population residing in the smaller cities exercises more influence 
than the proportion of whites in determining- the proportion of literates. 
The following figures show the returns of literacy at the censuses of 
1860 and 1887 as compared with the present: 



Census. 


Popula- 
tion. 


Number 
able to 
read. 


Per cent 

able to 

read. 


1860 


583,181 
806, 708 
953, 243 


51,386 
111,380 
158, 852 


8.8 
13.8 
16.6 


1887 


1899 





These figures show that the proportion of literates in the total popula- 
tion has increased from 8 to 16 per cent in forty years. Notwithstand- 
ing this slight increase, the proportion of illiterates in Porto Rico is 
higher than in any of the states of this Union or any of the other 
West Indian islands. Guatemala is the only country in the region for 
which statistics are obtainable, where the proportion of illiterates is 
higher than in Porto Rico. 

SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 

[See Tables XVII and XX.] 

The total number of persons attending school in Porto Rico during 
the year preceding November 10, 1899, was 26,212, or between 2 and 3 
per cent of the total population. But in the discussion on age it was 
shown (p. 49) that the children in Porto Rico between 5 and 15 years 
old, and so at the age when school attendance is most common, were 
unusually numerous. Hence it is better to compare the children 
attending school with those of school age. From Table XX (p. 267) it 
appears that only 414 children under 5 or over 17 years of age attended 
school — that is, about 1.5 per cent of the entire number. The school 
age may therefore be assumed to be 5-17, and the slight proportion of 
persons over or under these limits neglected. 

Number and per cent of children attending school. 



Country. 


Population 
5-17. 


Persons 5-17 attend- 
ing school. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Porto Rico 


322, 393 


25,798 


8.0 





It has already been shown that the proportion of persons able to 
read, and probably also the proportion of children attending school, 
was much higher in the cities of Porto Rico than in the rural districts. 
In the following table the facts for the two cities included in Table XX 
are given. 



76" 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 
Number and per cent of school children in cities. 



City. 


Population 
5-17. 


Persons 5- 17 attend- 
ing school. 


Number. 


Percent. 




7,904 
8,886 


1 
1,877 1 23.7 
1,901 j 21.3 




Total 


16,790 


3, 778 ! 22. 5 









On the average in the two cities less than one-fourth of the children 
5 to 17 attended school during the year preceding the census. If the 
figures for these two cities be subtracted from all Porto Rico, the 
following results are reached: 

Number and per cent of school children in rural districts. 



Region. 


Population 
5-17. 


Persons 5-17 attend- 
ing school. 

Number. Per cent. 


Porto Rico outside two cities of 25,000 


305, 603 


22,020 


7.2 



In the rural districts of Porto Rico less than one-fifteenth of the 
children between 5 and 17 years of age attended school during the 
year preceding the census, but in the large cities the proportion was a 
little more than three times as great. 

In the following table the figures are given for the seven depart- 
ments after the two large cities have been excluded: 

Number and per cent of school children in rural districts, by departments. 



Department. 



Arecibo 

Ponce 

Aguadilla 

Bayamon 

Humacao 

Guayama 

Mayaguez 

Porto Rico 





Persons 5-17 attend- 


Population 


ing school. 


5-17. 










Number. 


Per cent. 


56,388 


3,313 


5.8 


60, 369 


3,604 


5.9 


33, 766 


2,096 


6.2 


44, 817 


3, 150 


7.0 


30,038 


2,361 


7.8 


38, 537 


3,228 


8.3 


41, 688 


4, 268 


10.2 


305,603 


22, 020 


7.2 



The conspicuous position of Mayaguez agrees with the results of 
the analysis regarding ability to read (p. 74), but in the present table 
the position of this department is influenced by the inclusion of the 
city of Mayaguez. Here, too, one notices that the proportion of 
children attending school, like the proportion of literates, is lowest in 
the two northwesterly departments, where the proportion of whites 
is highest, while the two departments of Humacao and Guayama 
come next to Mayaguez in the proportion of children attending 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



77 



school, notwithstanding- the fact that about half of their population is 
colored. 

That there is a rough correlation between the rank of the depart- 
ments in the order of school attendance and in the order of literacy, 
appears from the following lists: 



Departments in the order of 



Increasing literacy: 
Arecibo. 
Ponce. 
Aguadilla. 
Bayamon. 
Humacao. 
Guayarna. 
Mayaguez. 



Increasing school attendance: 
Aguadilla. 
Arecibo. 
Bayamon. 
Ponce. 
Humacao. 
Guayarna. 
Mayaguez. 



School attendants classified by sex.— The following table gives the 
facts for Porto Rico by sex: 

Number and per cent of school children by sex. 



Sex. 



Male 

Female . . 

Total 



Population 
5-17. 



162, 838 
159, 555 



322, 393 



Persons 5-17 attend- 
ing school. 



Number. Per cent 



15, 273 

10, 525 



9.3 
6.5 



8.0 



The proportion of males attending school is much higher than that 
of females, and so great a difference in this respect is unusual. 

School attendants classified by age.— In the following table the pro- 
portion of school attendants in the several age classes is given: 

Number and per cent of school children by age. 



Age period. 


Population. 


School at- 
tendants. 


Per cent 
attend- 
ing 
school. 

0.1 

7.1 

11.6 

1.9 


0-4 


150, 403 
143, 546 
124, 353 
54,494 
480, 447 


209 

10,254 

14,492 

1,052 

205 


5-9... 


10 14 


15-17... 


18+ 


Total . . 




953,243 


26,212 


2.7 





The one noticeable feature of the preceding table is the relatively 
small proportion of children between 5 and 10 years of age who were 
attending school, and the sharp maximum in the proportion for the 
age period 10-14. In Cuba the proportions of children of these two 
age periods attending school are more nearly alike. 



78 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



School attendants classified by race. — The following table gives the 
facts regarding school attendance for Porto Rico, by race: 

Number and per cent of school children, by race. 



Race. 


Population 
5-17. 


Persons 5-17 attend- 
ing school. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


White 


196, 961 
125, 432 


17, 516 

8,282 


8.8 
6.6 




Total . . , 


322, 393 


25, 798 


8.0 





The proportion of colored children attending school is slightly less 
than the proportion of white children, but the difference between the 
two races in this regard is comparatively slight. 

In the following table the proportion of school attendants for each 
race is given by departments: 



Department. 



Aguadilla 
Arecibo. .. 

Ponce 

Humacao. 
Bayamon . 
Guayama 
Mayaguez 



Per cent of school 

attendants among 

children 5 to 17 

years old. 



White. 



6.0 
6.1 
8.8 
10.3 
11.1 
11.1 
11.9 



Colored. 



7.2 
5.1 
6.7 
5.7 

7.7 
5.5 
7.3 



The proportions of school attendants in the several departments do 
not vary for the two races in the same way. In Arecibo both races 
have few children in school and in Mayaguez both have many, but in 
Aguadilla, relatively to the other departments, there are few white and 
many colored school children, and in Guayama there are many white 
and few colored. Hence school attendance among the two races must 
be influenced by somewhat different conditions. 



LITERACY AMONG PERSONS OVER TEN YEARS OF AG3. 
[See Tables XVII and XVIIL] 

It is hardly accurate to include infants with the illiterate, even though 
they can not read, for the word •"illiterate''' implies that the person 
has advanced at least out of infancy into childhood. Hence it is the 
usual practice for a census in gathering information on this topic to 
disregard all children under a specified age. This has not been done 
in the censuses of Spain or of the Spanish colonies, but in American 
census practice all children under ten are omitted from the illiteracy 
tables. Such a classification is made in the present census of Porto 
Rico, and will be regarded in the following discussion. For reasons 
already explained, only two classes will be considered — those who are 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899. 



DD 










, |.*,._._^ jr)H ZJS6- j «, 

r* J \ / £ l » » y .M" ' I On 



ma 




LITERACY. 



79 



and those who are not able to read, 
facts for all Porto Rico: 



The following table gives the 



Class. 



Able to read . . . 
Unable to read 

Total 



Population 
10+. 



149, 796 
509, 498 



659, 294 



Per cent. 



22.7 
77.3 



About one-fourth of the population of Porto Rico, excluding young 
children, were able to read, a proportion decidedly less than that in 
any American state. 

The following table shows for the several departments the number 
and proportion of persons able to read. The departments are arranged 
in the order of increasing proportion of literates. 



Department. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Humacao 

Guayama 

Ponce 

Mayaguez 

Bayamon 

Porto Rico 



Total popu- 
lation 
10+. 



68, 307 
110, 832 

60, 539 

75, 750 
141,901 

91,052 
110, 913 



659, 294 



Persons 
able to 
read. 



11,454 
18, 796 
11,574 
15, 497 
34,390 
25, 931 
32, 154 



149, 796 



Per cent 
able to 
read. 



16.8 
17.0 
19.1 
20.5 
24.2 
28.5 
29.0 



22.7 



Here, as in the previous discussion, it appears that the part of the 
island most imperfectly provided with school facilities, and offering 
the least evidence of even elementary educational attainments, is in the 
northwest — Aguadilla and Arecibo. The three departments having the 
highest proportion of persons able to read are the departments con- 
taining cities of some size. 

The per cent of persons over 10 who were able to read has also been 
computed for each municipal district and will be found graphically 
represented on the map facing this page. While it is not worth while 
to present here the figures for each district, since they can readily be 
computed from the data in Table XVII, it may be of interest to present 
the ratios for a few districts having the largest and smallest propor- 
tions of literates. The first five and last five districts in this respect 
were as follows: 



Municipal district. 


Per cent of 
persons 
10+ able 
to read. 


Municipal district. 


Per cent of 
persons 
10+ able 
to read. 


San Juan 


63.7 
41.6 
61. $ 
38.3 
55.5 
30.8 
29.8 




12.4 
12.2 
11.7 
11.3 
9.9 






Mayaguez city 








Ponce city 




Vieques 

Guayama 







80 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

The preceding- figures show clearly the degree to which the elements 
of education are confined to the cities of Porto Rico. Each of the 
three cities has a percentage of persons over 10 able to read, almost 
twice as high as the highest of the 66 municipal districts not contain- 
ing a large city. As nearly 2,000 years ago the elements of Chris- 
tianity spread first through the cities of the Roman Empire, while 
the inhabitants of the villages and rural districts clung to the earlier 
faith until the residents of the village (pagus) or of the country (heath) 
came to be identified as pagans and heathen with the believers in the 
religion that was passing away, so at the present time in Porto Rico 
and Cuba the elements of education seem to have spread mainly or 
exclusively in the cities, leaving the country folk to ignorance. This 
illiteracy presses upon both races alike, and so far as one can judge 
from the geographical position alone, it is not true in Porto Rico, as in 
the United States, that illiteracy is most prevalent where the colored 
race is in largest proportions. For the five municipal districts in Porto 
Rico given in the preceding list as having the smallest proportions of 
persons able to read have, respectively, beginning with Rincon, 14.1 per 
cent, 21.7 per cent, 62 per cent, 11.7 per cent, and 15.9 per cent of colored 
population, while the average for the whole island is 38.2 per cent. 

If one examines the location on the map of Porto Rico of the muni- 
cipal districts with largest and smallest proportion of persons able to 
read, one notices that the districts with the best educated population 
seem to lie along the coast, while the districts having the most illiter- 
ate population generally lie in the interior. In order to determine 
whether this is a general fact, the percentage of illiterates to the 
population over 10 has been computed for the 37 coast districts, the 
three containing large cities being excluded, and for the 29 inland 
districts. It appears that along the coast outside the large cities, 20.5 
per cent of the population over 10 were able to read, while in the 
inland districts on the average only 17.3 per cent were able to read. 
But it has already been shown in the discussion of race (p. 59) that the 
percentage of colored in the coast districts is 7.5 per cent higher than 
in the interior districts, and from a subsequent paragraph (p. 82) it will 
appear that the percentage of illiteracy among colored in Porto Rico is 
much higher than among the whites. It is not improbable, therefore, 
that there is a greater difference between the whites of the interior dis- 
tricts and the whites along the coast, and between the colored of the 
interior districts and the colored along the coast, than the figures just 
stated would indicate. In other words, this may be an instance of two 
counteracting tendencies which nearly neutralize each other. The 
two races in Porto Rico, as in the United States, tend somewhat to 
separate along lines of altitude, thus making the whites more numer- 
ous in the interior. But the inland population apparently has less 
opportunity and perhaps less craving to acquire the elements of educa- 



LITEEACY. 



81 



tion, while on the other hand the white race usually has a somewhat 
greater eagerness for this accomplishment than the colored. 

In the following table the facts are given for Porto Rico by "sex: 



Class. 


Population 10+. 


Per cent. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 




82, 882 
239, 685 


66, 914 
269, 813 


25.7 
74.3 


19.9 
80.1 




Total 


322, 567 


336, 727 


100.0 


100.0 



The corresponding per cents of persons able to read in Cuba are: 
Males, 44. 6; females, 41.7; and for the United States they are: Males, 
87.6; females, 85.6; so that in all three countries, and indeed in most 
countries where the information is obtainable, ability to read is some- 
what more general among men than among women. 

In the following table the proportion of persons able to read in each 
age group is given for the total population : 



Age period. 


Per cent 
able to 
read. 


Age period. 


Per cent 
able to 
read. 


10 14 .. 


20.6 
25.2 
27.1 
24.4 
23.2 
22.3 


45-54 


19.2 
17.8 
17.7 


15-19. . 


55-64 


20-24 . 


65+ 


25-29 


Total 


30-34 


22.7 


35-44 





Of the persons between 15 and 30 years of age about one-fourth 
were able to read, while persons in the earlier or later age periods less 
often possessed this ability. That the persons in the later age periods 
are most illiterate appears clearly from the table, and points to the 
conclusion, alread}^ shown by the illiteracy figures of earlier censuses, 
that the rising generation are enjoying better educational advantages 
than their parents. 

In the following table the per cent of persons of each sex able to 
read is given for the successive age periods. To economize attention 
the numbers from which the ratios were computed have been omitted. 
They may be found on page 245, f . 



Age period. 


Per cent able to read. 


Males. 


Females. 


10-14 


21.8 
25.9 
31.2 
29.2 
27.6 
26.6 
22.8 
20.6 
20.5 


19.3 
24.7 
23.4 
20.1 
19.0 
17.8 
15.7 
15.0 
15.2 


15-19 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35^4 


45-54 


55-64 


65+ 


Total . 


25.7 


19.8 





8490—00* 6 



82 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



From this table it is seen that at all age periods the ability to read 
is an attainment somewhat more common among men than among 
women, but that the difference between the two sexes is least during 
the early periods of life, between 10 and 20 years of age, and greatest 
during the years of middle life. Apparently, therefore, educational 
facilities are open to the two sexes more equally at the present time 
than a generation ago. 

In the following table the number and per cent of males and females 
able to read are given for Porto Rico, with distinction of race: 



Race and sex. 



White males 

White females 

Total white.. 

Colored males 

Colored females . . . 

Total colored 



Total per- 
sons 10+. 



202, 351 
206, 727 



409, 078 



120, 216 
130, 000 



250, 216 



Persons 
able to 
read. 



62, 335 
48, 511 



110, 846 



20, 547 
18, 403 



38, 950 



Per cent 
able to 
read. 



30.8 
23.5 



27.1 



17.1 
14.2 



Of the whites over 10 years of age, more than one-fourth are able 
to read, while of the colored, not quite one-sixth have this attainment. 
One notices also that the difference between the two sexes is greater 
among the whites than among the colored. The proportion of white 
females able to read is about two-thirds greater than the proportion of 
colored females, but the proportion of white males able to read is four- 
fifths greater than the proportion of colored males. 

In the following table the proportion of persons able to read at the 
successive age periods is given separately for native white, foreign 
born white, and colored: 



Age period. 


Per cent able to read. 


Native 
white. 


Foreign 

born 

white. 


Colored. 


10-14 


23.3 

28.3 
29.7 
26.5 
25.2 
24.7 
22.2 
21.1 
21.4 


87.2 
93.4 
92.4 
91.6 
91.2 
87.9 
83.3 
79.2 
74.9 


15.9 

18.9 

20.3 

17.5 

15.6 

13.5 

9.8 

8.3 

7.2 


15-19 


20 24. . . 


25-29 


30 34 


35-44 


55-64 


65+ 


Total 


25.4 


87.5 


15.6 



The preceding table shows most conspicuously the very high degree 
of literacy among the few foreign born whites in Porto Rico. At the 
ages at which immigrants usually come to the island, over nine-tenths 
of the foreign born white are able to read, while among native whites 



SCHOOLS. 



83 



the proportion never rises to three-tenths. This high proportion of 
literacy among the foreign born no doubt contributes to the high 
degree of literacy in the cities in which these foreign born usually 
remain. 

Another inference from this table is that the difference between 
white and colored, like the difference between male and female, is less 
in the rising generation than it was in the preceding. During the ages 
from 10 to 20, the per cent of literates among the native whites is only 
about one-half greater than it is among the colored, but in the latest 
age period the proportion of white literates is more than three times 
that of colored literates. 

STATISTICS OF EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 
[See Tables XXI and XXII.] 

In addition to the facts regarding education derived from the 
schedule for population and just explained, a special schedule for schools 
was furnished to the enumerators, of which the following is a trans- 
lation: 

Census of Porto Rico, taken under the direction of the United States, 1899. 



Schedule No. 2. — School Statistics. 



Supervisor's district No. 
Compiled by me on the ■ 



— . District of enumeration No. 
day of , 1899. 



Enumerator. 



1. Name of the school. 

2. Situation. 

3. State whether the school is supported by public, private, or religious funds. 

4. State whether pupils are day or boarding pupils. 

5. Number of buildings composing the school; seating capacity. 

6. Number of teachers: males; females. 

7. Number of pupils in the school during the last school year: 



Color or race. 


Pay pupils. 


Free pupils. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


White 




















Mixed 










Chinese 





















-, 1898, to 



8. Number of working days in the last school year, from - 
1899. ' ' • 

9. Average daily attendance of pupils during the last school year. 

Tables XXI and XXII have been prepared from the facts reported 
on that schedule. From Table XXII it appears that 27,118 pupils were 
reported on the school schedule as attending school. From Table XX 
it appears that 26,212 children were reported as having attended school 
at some time during the twelve months preceding November 10, 1899; 
that is, the school children reported on the school schedule were 3 per 



84 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



cent more numerous than those reported on the population schedule. 
In the following table the results arc brought together by departments: 



Department. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



Children reported as 
attending school. 



On 

population 
schedule. 



2, 109 
3,368 
5, 207 
3, 250 
2, 403 
4,304 
5,571 



2(3,212 



On school 
schedule. 



2,282 
3,795 
5, 795 
3, 678 
2,966 
3,590 
5, 012 



27, 118 



Excess( + ) 
or deficien- 
cy (— ) re- 
ported on 

school 
schedule. 



+173 
+427 

i-;,ss 
+428 
+ 563 
-714 
-559 



+906 



In five departments more children were reported on the school 
schedule, and in two, more were reported on the population schedule. 
The general results from the two independent sources of information, 
however, are not very widely divergent and serve rather to corrobo- 
rate than to impeach each other. 

The number of school teachers reported on the school schedules was 
623, while the total number of teachers reported on the population 
schedule (Table XXV) was 809. This suggests that there were either 
many teachers on the island who were not school teachers or many 
from whom no returns were obtained regarding their schools. The 
deficiency was almost entirely among male teachers, for the occupa- 
tion returns show 246 female teachers, while the educational returns 
show 248 female teachers. On the other hand, the occupation tables 
show 563 male teachers, while the returns on the educational schedule 
show only 375 male school teachers. 

Aside from the conclusions already drawn from the tables for educa- 
tion, school attendance, and literacy, the following inferences from 
Tables XXI and XXII seem warranted: 

1. The reported seating capacity (29,164) was about 8 per cent 
greater than the entire number of pupils (27,118). 

2. The average attendance was only about four-sevenths of the 
pupils enrolled. 

3. Of the schools, about seven-eighths were public and one-eighth 
private or religious; a condition widely different from that in Cuba, 
where only about one-half were public. 

4. In five departments the number of school buildings was equal to 
the reported number of schools; in the other two departments the 
school buildings slightly outnumbered the schools. 

5. Of the school-teachers, about three-fifths were male and two- 
fifths female. In Cuba about two-fifths were male. 

6. Of the pupils, about nine-tenths were free pupils and one-tenth 
pa}^ pupils. In Cuba three-fourths were free pupils and one-fourth 



SCHOOLS. 



85 



pay pupils. But in Cuba, outside of Habana province, the proportions 
were more like those of Porto Rico. 

7. The following table gives the proportions of each class of popu- 
lation reported as in school: 



Class of population. 



White 

Negro 

Mulatto ... 

Total 



Total 
number. 



589, 426 

59, 390 

304, 352 



Pupils 
entered. 



17, 874 
2,427 
6,717 



1 27, 018 



Per cent of 

pupils to 

population. 



3.0 
4.0 
2.2 



1 Seemingly 100 pupils in Guayama were not returned by race, 
ruent in Tables XXI and XXII. 



Compare the figures for this depart- 



It is surprising that the proportion of negroes in school should be 
higher than that of the whites. Some light may be thrown upon this 
fact by a study of the proportion in school of each race in the several 
departments. That analysis follows: 



Department. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



Per cent of race specified entered 
as pupils. 



White. 



Negro. 



2.1 


5.7 


2.2 


2.4 


3.2 


1.6 


4.1 


4.3 


2.7 


3.9 


4.5 


2.1 


4.1 


4.0 


2.3 


3.0 


3.2 


2.2 


2.7 


3.5 


1.9 



Mixed. 



Here again it appears that in all but one of the seven departments 
the proportion of negroes attending school is greater than that of the 
whites, while the proportion of mixed is lowest of the three. These 
ratios are so contrary to the usual fact in such cases that one is com- 
pelled to cast about for an explanation. It is perhaps fair to assume 
that a certain number of school children have been reported on the 
school schedule bj^ their teachers as negro, while the same children 
were reported on the population schedule by their parents as mixed. 
If so, the true number of negro school children would be exaggerated 
or the number of negroes in the total population understated. 

In confirmation of this hypothesis the following evidence may be 
offered. By the present census there were 363,817 returned as colored, 
substantially all being negroes or mixed, the Chinese constituting less 
than 100 of the total. Of these colored only 59,390, or 16.3 per cent, 
were returned as negroes. Among the children attending school, as 
returned on the school schedule, there were 9,144 colored, and of these 
2,427, or 26.5 per cent, were returned as negroes. There seemsMittle 
reason to suppose that the proportion of negroes among colored school 
children is greater than the proportion of negroes among the colored 



86 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



population of all ages. The presumption apparently would be in the 
opposite direction. Assuming-, however, that the true proportion was 
the same, it would seem that while only one-sixth of the colored popu- 
lation were reported at their homes as negro, more than one-fourth of 
the colored children attending school were reported as negroes by the 
teachers giving information concerning them. This tends to discredit 
the testimony obtained by the census from the population of the coun- 
try regarding the degree of intermixture between white and colored, 
and to strengthen the distrust of the figures for negro and mixed 
already aroused by the surprising change in the reported proportion 
of mixed between 1897 and 1899. (See p. 58.) Whether the line sepa- 
rating the white population from that of mixed blood has been drawn 
in the census with greater accuracy is open to question, but upon that 
no internal evidence has been found. 

OCCUPATIONS. 

[See Tables XXIII-XXX.] 

The instructions issued in Spanish to Porto Rican enumerators with 
reference to filling this part of the schedule may be translated as fol- 
lows: 

This inquiry (column 11) applies to every person 10 years of age and over having 
a gainful occupation, and calls for the profession, trade, or branch of work upon 
which each person depends chiefly for support, or in which he is engaged ordinarily 
during the larger part of the time. In reporting occupations avoid general or indefi- 
nite terms which do not indicate the kind of work done. You need not give a per- 
son's occupation just as he expresses it. If he can not tell intelligibly what he is, 
find out what he does, and describe his occupation accordingly. For wives and 
daughters at home, engaged in the duties of the household only, write "at home" 
(en casa). For children not actually at work, write "at school" (estudiante) or "at 
home" (en casa), as the case may be. Spell out the name of the occupation and do 
not abbreviate in any case. 1 

The number of Porto Ricans reported as having gainful occupations 
was 316,365, or 33.1 per cent of the total population. The figures for 
Porto Rico are compared with those for Cuba and the United States in 
the following table: 



Country. 


Date. 


Total popu- 
lation. 


In gainful occupations. 


Number. 


Per cent. 




1899 
1899 
1890 


953, 243 

1,572,797 

62, 622, 250 


316, 365 

622, 330 

22, 735, 661 


33.1 
39.6 
36.3 









1 It is desirable that some brief terms should be introduced to describe persons cov- 
ered by the preceding instructions, and accurately but clumsily described as persons 
engaged in gainful occupations and persons not engaged in gainful occupations. In 
the following discussion the terms "breadwinners" or "persons at work" will some- 
times be used for one class, and ' ' dependents ' ' for the other. Any term must be 
understood in accordance with these instructions rather than with its usual and popu- 
lar meaning. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



87 



From these figures it appears that Porto Rico has only one-third of 
its population engaged in some gainful occupation, while in Cuba the 
proportion is about two-fifths, and in the United States about midway 
between the two. Some reasons for the difference will appear as the 
subject is probed farther. 

The absolute and relative number of persons engaged in gainful 
occupations in the several departments is as follows: 



Department. 



Arecibo... 
Guayama. 
Humacao. 
Aguadilla 
Bayamon . 

Ponce 

Mayaguez 



Population. 



162, 308 
111,986 
88, 501 
99, 645 
160, 046 
203, 191 
127, 566 



In gainful occupations. 



Number. Per cent 



51,439 


31.6 


36,154 


32.2 


28, 815 


32.5 


32,644 


32.7 


52, 822 


33.0 


69, 803 


34.3 


44, 688 


35.0 



Here, as elsewhere, one finds little difference between the depart- 
ments of Porto Rico in comparison with that between the provinces 
of Cuba or the states of the American Union. The range in Porto 
Rico between the highest and the lowest divisions was 3.4 per cent, 
while for the provinces of Cuba it was 12.6, and for the states of the 
United States 25.4 per cent. There is no correlation traceable in the 
preceding table between the proportion of persons in gainful occupa- 
tions and the proportion of urban population. Yet it is generally 
found that the relative number of breadwinners 1 is greater in cities 
than in the rural districts. To determine whether this general statis- 
tical fact holds for Porto Rico, the following table has been prepared 
for the three large cities and the remainder of the departments in 
which tHse cities lie: 



Department. 



Bayamon . . 
Mayaguez . 
Ponce 

Total 



Per cent of persons 
engaged in gainful 
occupations. 



In princi- 
pal city. 



43.7 
43.7 
46.2 



In rest of 
depart- 
ment. 



30.3 
33.8 
32.4 



32.1 



From the above it will be seen that in Mayaguez city the proportion 
of breadwinners is nearly three-tenths greater than in Mayaguez 
department outside the city, and that in Ponce and San Juan cities 
the proportion is over two-fifths greater than in the remainder of the 
departments in which they lie. The difference between city and 
country in Porto Rico as thus measured, is more than one-half greater 



1 See page 86, footnote. 



88 



KEPOKT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



than the average difference in the United States, and fully fpur times 
greater than the average difference in Cuba. 

BREADWINNERS CLASSIFIED BY SEX. 

The following table gives the absolute and relative number of males 
and of females reported as engaged in gainful occupations in Porto 
Rico. For comparative purposes the figures for Cuba and the United 
States have been included. 





Males. 


Females. 


Country. 


Total. 


Breadwinners. 


Total. 


Breadwinners. 




Number. 


Per cent. 


Number. 


Per cent. 




472,261 

815, 205 

32,067,880 


268, 664 

555, 974 

18,821,090 


56.9 
68.2 

58.7 


480, 982 

757, 592 

30, 554, 370 


47, 701 

66, 356 

3, 914, 571 


9.9 


Cuba 


8.8 


United States (1890) 


12.8 







From this table it appears that the small proportion of breadwinners 
in Porto Rico, as compared with Cuba, holds only of the males, the 
proportion of females at work in Porto Rico being somewhat greater 
than in Cuba, although decidedly less than in the United States. The 
differences between the departments in the number of male breadwin- 
ners are slight, the range between Bayamon and Ponce, the depart- 
ments with the lowest and highest proportions, respectivel} T , being less 
than 3 per cent. Among females, the range between Arecibo, with the 
lowest proportion, and Mayaguez, with the highest, is nearly 5 per 
cent, a range somewhat greater than that obtaining with males. As 
the department with fewest males at work is not that with fewest 
females at work, and as the department with most males at work is 
not that with most females, it would seem that the conditions affecting 
breadwinning on the part of the two sexes are not identical. The 
three departments with a high ratio of female breadwinners are the 
three containing large cities. This suggests that breadwinning on the 
part of women may be more common in the cities. To test this, the 
percentage of breadwinners in the urban and rural population of these 
three departments is given with distinction of sex. 

Per cent of breadwinners in urban and rural population, by sex. 



Department. 


Male. 


Female. 


In princi- 
pal city. 


In rest 
of depart- 
ment. 


In princi- 
pal city. 


In rest 
of depart- 
ment. 




65.8 
64.0 
65.4 


53.1 
57.5 
67.4 


24.1 
27.3 
29.0 


8.1 
10.3 

6.8 






Total 


65.3 


56.1 


26.6 


8.1 





From this table it appears that while gainful occupations are more 
common with both sexes in the cities, yet the difference is far greater 
among females than among males. Female breadwinners in the cities 



OCCUPATIONS. 



89 



are over one-fourth, while in the rural districts the proportion is only 
one-third as high. The difference between city and countiy in the 
ratio of breadwinners to population is thus partly explained by the 
greater proportion of female breadwinners in the cities. 



BREADWINNERS CLASSIFIED BT AGE. 

In the discussion of age it was shown (p. 48) that the proportion of 
children under 10 in Porto Rico is larger than almost anywhere else in 
the civilized world. In the vast majority of cases, such children are 
dependent upon their elders for support. It is not quite accurate, 
therefore, to compare the number of persons engaged in gainful occu- 
pations, practically all of whom are over 10, with the total population, 
nearly a third of whom are under 10. A more specific comparison, 
that of breadwinners with the population over 10, is made below. 



Country. 


Persons 10 + . 


Persons in gainful 
occupations. 


Number. 


Per cent. 




659, 294 

1,215,810 

47,413,559 


316, 365 

622, 330 

22, 735, 661 


48.0 
51.2 
47.9 




United States (1890) 





When the children under 10 are excluded, the difference already 
noted (p. 86) between Porto Rico and the United States in the ratio »f 
breadwinners disappears. But the difference between the two and 
Cuba still remains. 

When similar percentages are computed for the seven departments, 
it appears that the lowest, Arecibo, differs from the highest, Ponce, 
by only 2.8 per cent, while, when the total population is included, the 
lowest differs from the highest by 3.1 per cent. This shows that the 
differences between the departments are partly, though not entirely, 
due to their differences in the proportion of young children. In the 
following table the number and per cent of persons in gainful occupa- 
tions are given with details of age, and for comparison percentage 
columns for Cuba and the United States are introduced. 

Persons in gainful occupations. 



Age period. 


Population. 


Number in 
Porto Rico. 


Per cent in 




Porto 
Rico. 


Cuba. 


United 

States. 


0-9 


293, 949 
124, 353 
93, 148 
88, 475 
84, 265 
64, 317 
91, 802 
59, 268 
33, 716 
19, 950 


1,670 

27, 939 
45, 990 
48, 195 
45, 008 
35, 593 
52, 267 
32, 859 
17, 951 
8,893 


0.5 
22.4 
49.3 
54.4 
53.4 
55.3 
56.9 
55.4 
53.2 
44.5 


0.6 
24.6 
48.8 
56.2 
57.7 
59.3 
60.4 
60.3 
59.5 
52.0 




10-14... 


8.6 
42.9 
61.4 

} 59.1 

57.7 
56.4 
54.1 
41.6 


15-19 


20-24 

25-29 

30-34 

35-44 


45-54 


55-64 


65+ 


Total 


953, 243 


316,365 


33.1 


39.6 


36.3 



90 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



In Porto Rico over one-fifth of the children between 10 and 14 are 
reported as engaged in gainful occupations; between 15 and 19 nearly 
one-half are so reported; and from that age to that of 65, between five- 
tenths and six-tenths of the persons are reported as at work. During 
the later years of life, from 35 to 65, the proportion of persons at work 
in Porto Rico is lower than in either Cuba or the United States, but for 
persons over 65 the minimum is found in the United States. The high 
proportion of children in gainful occupations is closely connected not 
merely with the poverty of the masses in Porto Rico, but also with 
her backward industrial condition and the slight development of the 
school system, which has appeared from the illiteracy and education 
tables. 

BREADWINNERS CLASSIFIED BY AGE AND SEX. 

In the following table the number of breadwinners in Porto Rico of 
the specified sex and age is given, and the percentage that the bread- 
winners make of the total number of persons of a given age and sex is 
shown in parallel columns for Porto Rico, Cuba, and the United States. 
The figures for Porto Rico from which the percentages haye been 
computed may be derived from those on page 306. 



Number and per cent of persons, o 


f sex and age specified, 


engaged 


in gair 


fid occupations. 




Males in gainful occupations. 


Females in gainful occupations. 


Age period. 


Number 

in Porto 

Rico. 


Per cent in — 


Number 

in Porto 

Rico. 


Per cent in— 


Porto 
Rico. 


Cuba. 


United 

States 
(1890). 


Porto 
Rico. 


Cuba. 


United 

States 
(1890). 


0-9 


900 
23, 155 
37, 453 
40, 408 
38, 497 
30, 665 
45, 228 
28, 468 
15, 857 
8,033 


0.6 
35.5 
87.2 
96.9 
97.5 
97.7 
97.4 
96.2 
94.6 
86.6 


0.9 
44.0 
91.6 
98.1 
98.5 
98.6 
98.3 
97.5 
96.2 
90.2 




770 
4,784 
8, 537 
7,787 
f 6, 511 
\ 4, 928 
7,039 
4,391 
2,094 

860 


0.5 
8.0 
17.0 
16.6 
14.5 
14.9 
15.5 
14.7 
12.3 
8.0 


0.2 
4.5 
10.3 
11.4 
12.0 
13.4 
14.6 
15.6 
15.8 
13.3 




10-14 


11.2 

58.6 
92.0 

} 97.4 

97.9 
96.6 
92.9 
73.8 


6.9 


15-19 . . 


27 4 


20-24 


30.6 


25-29 


} 17.3 
13 2 


30-34 


35-44 


45-54 


12.9 


55-64 


12.0 


65+ 


8.3 






Total 


268, 664 


56.8 


68.2 


58.7 


47, 701 


9.9 


8.8 


12 8 







If the percentages for the three countries in the above table be 
carefully compared, it will appear that, generally speaking, Porto Rico 
occupies an intermediate position between Cuba and the United States. 
Among the three countries Cuba has the largest and Porto Rico the 
smallest proportion of male breadwinners, while on the other hand 
the United States has the largest and Cuba the smallest proportion of 
female breadwinners. This is true, not only of the total population 
over 10, but of most of the separate age groups. 

A noteworthy difference between both of the West India islands on 
the one hand and the United States on the other is the large propor- 
tion of male breadwinners between 10 and 15 years of age. The 
proportion of these in Porto Rico is more than three times, and in 
Cuba nearly four times, as great as the proportion in the United States. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



91 



Of male breadwinners between 15 and 19, the proportion in the two 
West India islands is greater than it is in the United States by one-half, 
but thereafter the proportions of male breadwinners in the three coun- 
tries do not differ very widely. During the latest years of life, over 55, 
the proportion is lowest in the United States, undoubtedly owing to 
the considerable number of persons who have withdrawn from gainful 
occupations and are living on their own savings or on the surplus of 
other members of the household. Boys and old men are thus at work 
in Porto Rico to a greater degree than they are in the United States. 

In the three columns for women another remarkable difference 
appears between the two West India islands and the United States. In 
the latter the proportion of female breadwinners rises rapidly in the 
years of early life to a maximum between 20 and 21 years of age, when 
three women out of ten are in gainful occupations. In this age 
period the proportion of female wage earners in the United States is 
almost double that at any age in Porto Rico or Cuba, but the propor- 
tion declines so rapidly that from the age of 35 it is at each period 
lower than in Cuba, and in each period but the last lower than in Porto 
Rico. Wage earning on the part of women in the United States thus 
seems to be in many cases only a preliminary to marriage and the 
duties of family life, while in Porto Rico and Cuba it would seem that 
female breadwinners more commonly work through the years of 
later life. 

It has so often been found that the departments differ but slightly 
from each other in their census figures, that it is hardly worth while to 
push the analysis to that detail. The city and country districts, how- 
ever, have been found in some cases to differ widely, and to deter- 
mine whether a material difference exists in the present case the fol- 
lowing table has been compiled, in which by "urban districts" are 
meant the two cities of more than 25,000 inhabitants — Ponce and San 
Juan, and by " rural districts" is meant the rest of the island. Refer- 
ence to the extended tables will show that these are the only two cities 
which are separately reported. 

Per cent of persons in urban and rural districts, of age and sex specified, who were engaged 

in gainful occupations. 



Age period. 


Per cent of breadwinners. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Urban. 


Rural. 


Urban. 


Rural. 


Urban. ' Rural. 


0-9 


1.1 
21.5 
58.3 
65.2 
65.7 
67.7 
64.5 
59.5 
53.7 
35.5 


0.5 
22.5 
48.6 
53.4 
52.3 
54.3 
56.3 
55.1 
53.2 
45.1 


0.9 
27.7 
86.4 
97.0 
97.5 
96.9 
95.7 
91.5 
87.0 
73.2 


0.5 
35.9 
87.3 
96.9 
97.5 
97.8 
97.5 
96.5 
95.0 
87.2 


1.3 4 


10-14 


15.6 


7.6 


15-19 


34.3 
36.1 
35.4 
40.4 
37.1 
35.6 
31.0 
17.9 


15.5 
14.8 
12.8 
12.8 
13.6 
12.9 
10.6 
7.2 


20-24 


26-29 


30-34 


36-44 


45-54 


55-64 


65+ 


Total 


44.9 


32.4 


65.6 


56.3 


26.4 


8.7 





92 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



From the first two columns of the preceding table it appears that 
gainful occupations are less common in the rural than in the urban 
districts of Porto Rico at eveiy age period except that from 10 to 14, 
and that of 65+. Child labor is apparently, and the labor of old peo- 
ple is certainly, more common in the country districts than it is in the 
larger cities. The greater proportion for the cities in the other age 
periods, and the larger proportion of children in the country, result 
in a ratio of breadwinners to total population in the urban districts 
much greater than in the country. 

Passing to the two columns for males, one notices that gainful occu- 
pations for that sex are usually more common in the rural districts, 
the only important exception being the two age periods between 20 and 
30, when the proportion of breadwinners in city and country is about 
the same. The minor difference in the proportion under 10 may be 
neglected. Maivy may be surprised that the proportion of males 
engaged in gainful occupations is greater in the country districts at 
almost every age period, and yet that for the total of all ages the pro- 
portion of males in gainful occupations in the cities is greater. At 
first one is at a loss to understand how an excess at each age period, or 
practically that, can sum to a deficiencj^ in the total. The paradox is 
explained bj^ noticing that the proportion of children in the urban 
districts is very much less than in the rural districts, and that, conse- 
quently, the proportion of total population eligible for gainful occupa- 
tions is much greater. In the two cities under consideration only 20.9 
per cent of the total population are under 10, while in the rest of the 
island no less than 31.4 per cent are under 10. If in each case the male 
children are subtracted from the total male population, one finds that, 
of the total males over 10 in cities, 84.1 per cent were breadwinners, 
but in the rural districts 83.2 per cent were breadwinners. 

Lastly, if one compares the two columns giving the proportion of 
female breadwinners in city and country, it appears that at each age 
period the female breadwinners are somewhat more numerous in the 
urban than in the rural districts, the excess rising in the cities at the 
age period 30 to 34 to more than three times that in the country districts 
at the same age period. And, owing largely to the smaller proportion 
of children in the cities, as just mentioned, the female breadwinners 
of all ages in cities are relatively thrice as numerous as in the country. 

BREADWINNERS CLASSIFIED BY RACE. 

In the following table the absolute and relative number of persons 
engaged in gainful occupations is given with distinction of race: 



Race. 


Population. 


Persons in gainful 
occupations. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


White 


589, 426 
303. 817 


189, 762 
126, 603 


32.1 
34.8 


Colored 


Total 


'J53, 243 


316, 365 


33.1 



OCCUPATIONS. 



93 



This shows that the proportion of breadwinners was somewhat 
higher among- the colored than among the whites. In the following 
table the corresponding per cents for the United States (1890) and 
for Cuba are introduced: 

Per cent of persons in gainful occupations. 



Country. 


White. 


Colored. 


Differ- 1 
ence. 




32.1 
38.3 
35.5 


34.8 
42.1 
41.8 


2.7 ) 

3.8 1 
6.3 




United States (1890) 





The difference between the two races appears in all three countries, 
but in Porto Rico it is only about three-fourths of the difference in 
Cuba, and less than half the difference in the United States. To elu- 
cidate these differences the classification by sex may be added to that 
by race. 

BREADWINNERS CLASSIFIED BY RACE AND SEX. 

The following table gives the absolute and relative numbers for 
Porto Rico: 



Race and sex. 


Population. 


Persons in 
occupa 

Number. 


gainful 
tions. 

Per cent. 




294, 195 
178, 066 
295, 231 
185, 751 


167, 662 
101,002 
22, 100 
25, 601 


57.0 
56. 7 

7.4 
13.7 








Total 


153, 243 


316, 365 


33.1 





The difference between white and colored among males is too small 
to be significant. The difference between the two races is due entirely 
to the fact that gainful occupations are followed by colored women to 
nearly twice the extent that they are by white women. To determine 
whether this is true also of other countries the percentage figures are 
given side by side in the following table: 

Per cent of persons in gainful occupations. 



Country. 


Males. 


Females. 


White. 


Colored. 


Differ- 
ence. 


White. 


Colored. 


Differ- 
ence. 


Porto Rico 


57.0 
68.4 
58.9 


56.7 
67.6 
57.4 


0.3 
0.8 
1.5 


7.5 
3.6 
11.0 


13.8 
18 2 


6.3 
14 6 


United States 


25.8 


14.8 



In all three countries the proportion of breadwinners among white 
males was slightly higher than the proportion among colored males; 
but in all three this difference is outweighed by the fact that colored 
women are at work more generally than white women. The difference 
between the women of the two races in this regard, however, is less 



94 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



marked in Porto Rico than in either Cuba or the United States. For 
each race and sex, with a single exception, the proportion of bread- 
winners in Porto Rico is lower than in either of the other countries. 
White women are working in gainful occupations in Porto Rico to 
twice the extent the} 1, are in Cuba, although to an extent little more 
than half that prevailing in the United States. 



BREADWINNERS CLASSIFIED AS NATIVE AND FOREIGN BORN. 

This distinction is made in the occupation tables only for the whites. 
The colored foreign born, of whom there are 2,450 in Porto Rico, 
must be disregarded. The facts for the whites are given in the follow- 
ing table, by race and sex: 



Nativity and sex. 



Native white males 

Foreign born white males. . 

Native white females 

Foreign born white females 

Total 



Population. 



285, 303 
8,892 

292, 706 
2,525 



589, 426 



Persons in gainful 
occupations. 



Number. Per cent, 



159,478 

8,184 

21, 862 

238 



189, 762 



55. 9 

92.0 

7.4 

9.4 



32.1 



Hardly a moment's reflection is needed to detect the cause of the 
wide difference indicated in the preceding table between the native 
and the foreign born males and to reveal the insignificant character 
of such a table taken alone. The immigrant whites are mainly adults, 
and the large proportion of workers among them is not because they 
are of foreign birth, but is because they are adult. Hence, if there is 
any real difference between these two classes of whites, to discover it, 
groups of the same age must be compared. This is done in the follow- 
ing table: 



Age period. 


Males. 


Females. 


Native 
white. 


Foreign 
white. 


Colored. 


Native 
white. 


Foreign 
white. 


Colored. 


0-9 


0.4 
33.6 
85.6 
96.5 
97.3 
97.5 
97.2 
96.1 
94.3 
86.9 


0.9 
38.0 
93.9 
98.1 
97.9 
98.3 
96.0 
93.8 
92.5 
76.8 


0.8 
38.4 
89.6 
97.6 
97.7 
98.0 
97.9 
96.7 
95.2 
87.3 


0.3 

6.5 

13.7 

13.1 

11.2 

10.8 

10.9 

9.9 

8.1 

5.5 




0.8 
10.5 
22.3 
22.2 
19.7 
21.5 
22.7 
22.0 
18.9 
12.0 


10-14 . . . 


0.9 

7.0 

18.1 

11.1 

13.0 

9.2 

10.9 

9.2 

4.7 


15-19 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-44 


45-54 


55-64 


65+ 


Porto Rico 


55.9 


92.0 


56.7 


7.4 


9.4 


13.7 



This table shows that among males child labor is more common 
among the colored than among the white, but that from the age of 15 
to that of 35 the proportion of breadwinners among the foreign born 
white is greater than among either of the other two classes. For later 
ages, from 35 on, the proportion is greatest among the colored, while 
that among the foreign born white sinks to the lowest of the three. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



95 



This may be due to the better economic condition of the foreign born 
white, enabling them to retire at an earlier age, or it may be explained 
by considering that the foreign born white are not preeminently 
engaged in agriculture, and that the other forms of industry can not 
be carried on so effectively by persons of advanced years. Among 
the females one notices that from the beginning to the end of life, the 
proportion of wage earners among the colored is greater than in 
either of the other classes, and in the later age periods it is more 
than twice as great among the colored as among either of the other 
classes. 

BREADWINNERS CLASSIFIED BY KIND OF OCCUPATION. 

The occupations in which persons are engaged are grouped by the 
census into five main classes. Arranged in the order of their preva- 
lence, the groups are: 

1. Agriculture, fisheries, and mining. 

2. Domestic and personal service. 

3. Manufacturing and mechanical industries. 

4. Trade and transportation. 

5. Professional service. 

The first class includes all persons engaged in the so-called extrac- 
tive industries, or those concerned with getting the wealth out of the 
earth or water; the third class includes those who transform the raw 
material furnished by the extractive industries into new forms or com- 
binations; the fourth class includes all engaged in giving place or time 
values to wealth by moving it from a place where it is less needed to 
a place where it is more needed, or by saving it from a time when it 
is less needed till a time when it is more needed, while the second and 
fifth classes include all whose contribution to society is in the form of 
personal service rather than of goods or of services upon goods. The 
line of division between these groups or classes is often obscure, and 
in many individual cases serious difficulties arise regarding the best 
group to which a person or an occupation should be assigned under 
the imperfect description found on the schedule. 

The population of Porto Rico engaged in gainful occupations was 
divided among the five groups as shown in the following table, where 
similar proportions for Cuba and the United States are added. 

Persons in gainful occupations. 



Class of occupation. 



Agriculture, fisheries, and mining 

Domestic and personal service 

Manufacturing and mechanical industries. 

Trade and transportation 

Professional service 

Total 



Number in 
Porto Rico. 



198, 761 
64,819 
26, 515 
24, 076 
2,194 



316, 365 



Per cent in— 



Porto 
Rico. 



62.8 

20.5 

8.4 

7.6 

0.7 



100.0 



Cuba. 



48.1 
22.8 
14.9 
12.8 
1.4 



100.0 



United 
States 
(1890). 



39.7 
19.2 
22.4 
14.6 
4.1 



100.0 



96 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



From this table it appears that the proportion of breadwinners 
engaged in agriculture in Cuba is nearly 10 per cent higher than in 
the United States, and in Porto Rico nearly 15 per cent higher than in 
Cuba. About five-eighths of the breadwinners in Porto Rico were 
reported as engaged in agriculture. The proportions engaged in per- 
sonal and domestic service are not widely different in the three regions. 
The great number of Porto Ricans engaged in agriculture is counter- 
balanced mainly by relatively much smaller numbers engaged in 
manufacturing and mechanical pursuits, and also in trade and trans- 
portation. The number of persons engaged in professional service in 
Porto Rico is only one-half what it is in Cuba, as in Cuba it is only 
one-third what it is in the United States. In the following table the 
per cent of all breadwinners engaged in each class of occupation is 
shown by sex for the three countries: 

Per cent of breadrvinners in the five classes of gainful occupations. 



Class of occupation. 


Porto Rico. 


Cuba. 


United States. 


Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 


Ma'e. 


Female. 




73.3 
10.2 
7.5 
8.3 
0.7 


3.9 
78.4 
13.4 

3.6 

0.7 


52.6 
17.2 
14.7 
14.2 
1.3 


10.3 
69.6 
16.6 
1.0 
2.5 


44.3 
14.3 
21.6 
16.4 
3.4 


17.4 




42 6 


Manufacturing and mechanical pursuits 


26. 2 

5 8 




8 






Total 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 







Nearly three-fourths of the male breadwinners in Porto Rico were 
engaged in agriculture, but not one twenty-fifth of the females. On 
the other hand, about one-tenth of the males and eight-tenths of the 
females were engaged in domestic and personal service. Thus these 
two classes taken together were apparently a complement of each other 
and included between them nearly five-sixths of all the breadwinners of 
each sex. As between trade and transportation on the one hand, and 
manufacturing and mechanical pursuits on the other, the males in Porto 
Rico were somewhat evenly divided, but of the females nearly four 
times as many were engaged in manufacturing as in trade and trans- 
portation. Comparing the three countries, one notices that the pro- 
portion of male breadwinners devoted to agriculture rises from about 
four-ninths in the United States to nearly three-fourths in Porto Rico, 
but the number of females devoted to agriculture varies inversely from 
a minimum of one twenty -fifth in Porto Rico to a maximum of one- 
sixth in the United States. The same is true for the persons of each 
sex devoted to professional service, and, with one slight exception, for 
all persons of each sex devoted to trade and transportation. The whole 
table points to an extremely simple and primitive organization of 
industry in Porto Rico, wherein manufacturing, trade, transportation, 
and professional occupations play a very small part. To illustrate 
this, one may compute from the preceding table the number of persons 



SIZE OF FAMILIES. 



97 



among 100 breadwinners in each of the three countries who were 
engaged in other pursuits than agriculture, fisheries, and mining, or 
domestic or professional service. In Porto Rico about 17 in 100 bread- 
winners, in Cuba about 25 in 100, and in the United States (1890) about 
40 in 100, were engaged in some form of manufacturing or mechanical 
pursuits, in trade or transportation, or in professional service. 

BREADWINNERS CLASSIFIED BY SPECIFIED OCCUPATIONS. 

Table XXV gives the specified occupations of the great majority 
of breadwinners in Porto Rico. A cursory examination shows that 
the single occupations are very imperfectly distinguished and that 
little can be derived from their inspection by one unfamiliar with local 
conditions. The following table shows the per cent of all breadwin- 
ners in each of a few leading occupations: 



Specified occupation. 



Laborers 

Servants 

Launderers 

Merchants 

Dressmakers and seamstresses 
Carpenters 



Per cent 
of all 
bread- 
winners 
so en- 



68.2 
8.2 
5.4 
2.8 
1.8 
1.6 



Specified occupation. 



Salesmen and saleswomen . , 
Agents 

Operatives in cigar factories 

Total 



Per cent 
of all 
bread- 
winners 
so en- 



1.5 
1.3 
1.2 



92.0 



In these nine specified occupations are included over nine-tenths of 
the breadwinners of Porto Rico. Of all males in gainful occupations 
nearly four-fifths (78.8 per cent) are reported simply as laborers. 
The other leading occupations followed by men, arranged in order of 
prevalence, are merchants, servants, carpenters, salesmen, agents, 
operatives in cigar factories, bakers. The leading occupations entered 
by women in order of prevalence are servant, laundress, dressmaker 
and seamstress, laborer, merchant, hat and cap maker, teacher, planter, 
huckster and peddler. 

SIZE OF FAMILIES. 

[See Table XXXI.] 

A family, in the ordinary or popular sense of the word, means a 
group of persons bound together by ties of kindred. Usually they 
live together, but this is not necessarily involved in the word, for a 
married son or daughter occupying a separate house is regarded as still 
a member of the family. On the other hand, not all persons who live 
with the family are deemed members, for servants, laborers, or board- 
ers are excluded. 

The census finds such a definition of the family inapplicable to its 
field of work. The test of kindred can not be applied by the enumera- 
tor. In many cases families of relatives are dispersed through the 
8490—00 7 



98 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

community, returns about them come through different enumerators, 
and their names and the facts about them can not be assembled on the 
schedules or tabulated together. Accordingly in this field, as in sev- 
eral others, the census is forced to abandon the effort to bring together 
data that belong together, and to confine itself to the simpler and more 
practicable task of tabulating together data that are found by the enu- 
merators conjoined. The census test of a family is not kinship by 
blood, but association in home life. Persons living in the same home 
are, for census purposes, members of the same family. 

In census-usage, therefore, the word "family" means the group of 
people, whether related by blood or not, who share a common dwelling 
and table. If one person sleeps and eats alone, he constitutes for cen- 
sus purposes a family. On the other hand, if a large group of people 
sleep and eat in a common dwelling, like a hotel or convent, they 
make up a single census family. Census families, therefore, may be 
divided into two classes — natural families, or families in the popular 
sense of that word, and "other families." Members of a natural 
family are bound together primarily by ties of kindred. Members of 
other families are bound together primarily by other motives, usually 
of an economic character. The latter may, perhaps, without great 
violence to the facts, be called economic families. These two classes 
of motives may and often do coexist, but the family should be classed 
with natural families or with economic families according to the class 
of motives which is primary. For example, a family having only one 
boarder should doubtless be grouped with natural families, but a family 
in which the boarders largely outnumber the blood relatives should be 
grouped with economic families. 

The limits of size are much wider in the economic family than in the 
natural family. The economic family may consist of one person liv- 
ing alone, of two partners living together at their place of business, of 
three or more boarders living with a housekeeper, or of hundreds 
of guests, nuns, or prisoners living together in a hotel, convent, or 
prison. On the basis of number of members alone no sharp line can be 
drawn between natural families and economic families. Still, the only 
classification of census families presented in Table XXXI is that by 
size, and on this basis, therefore, an attempt may perhaps be ventured 
to divide census families into two classes, one of which should consist 
mainly of natural families and the other mainly of economic families. 

As a natural family can not be composed of a single member, the 
lower limit of size for a natural family may be drawn with confidence 
between two members and one. The higher limit is more vague and 
uncertain. Yet it seems that if all families of more than ten persons 
are grouped as economic families, a large proportion, if not a majority, 
of the persons in them might be assumed to be living apart from their 
kindred — that is, as farm laborers in their employer's family, or as 
boarders, lodgers, or residents of hotels, schools, prisons, or other 



SIZE OF FAMILIES. 



99 



institutions treated by the census as a family, but not so regarded in 
ordinary speech. On this basis, therefore, the families in Porto Rico 
may be divided into the following three groups: 

1. Families of 1 member. 

2. Families of 2 to 10 members. 

3. Families of more than 10 members. 

Of these groups, the second consists mainly of natural .families, the 
first entirely and the third largely, if not mainly, of economic families. 

FAMILIES OF ONE MEMBER. 

This class in Porto Rico numbered 7,854, or 0.8 per cent of the 
population. In the United States and Cuba the corresponding per 
cents were 0.7 and 1.9, respectively. Families of one member, there- 
fore, are slightly more common in Porto Rico than in the United 
States, but less than half as common as in Cuba. 

In the following table the proportion of population living in fami- 
lies of a single member is given by departments: 



Department. 



Mayaguez . 
Bayamon.. 
Humacao. . 

Ponce 

Guayama.. 

Arecibo 

Aguadilla . 

Total 



Population. 



127, 566 
160, 046 

88, 501 
203, 191 
111, 986 
162, 308 

99,645 



953, 243 



Population 
in families 

of one 
member. 



1,714 
1,400 
771 
1,620 
857 
960 
532 



7,854 



1.3 
0.8 
0.8 
0.7 
7 
0.5 
0.5 



The departments with the smallest proportion are the two in which 
the proportion of population living in cities is lowest (p. 14). It may 
be, therefore, that families of one member are more common in cities. 
To test this conjecture the following table has been constructed, show- 
ing the number of persons living in families of one member in the 
three large cities of Porto Rico and in the rest of the island, and the 
per cent these make of the total population of each district. 



District. 


Total popu- 
lation. 


Population 
in families 

of one 
member. 


Percent. 


Three cities 


75, 187 
878, 056 


1,496 
6,358 


1.9 
0.7 


Rest of Porto Rico 





The table shows that the proportion of persons living alone in the three 
cities is nearly three times that of the proportion living alone in the 
rest of the island. A similar fact holds for Cuba, the explanation of 
which doubtless is that in the country a family must be, in a large 
measure, an economic unit and self-sustaining, while when people 
are living as close neighbors, such economic independence of the family 
is far less essential. When the figures for the several cities and depart- 



100 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



ments are analyzed, it appears that in the city of Mayaguez living 
alone is much more common than in either of the other large cities, 
and that in the department outside of the city, it is much more common 
than in any of the other six departments, even if the cities be included 
with them. 

FAMILIES OF ELEVEN OR MORE MEMBERS. 

Such families in Porto Rico included 109,300 persons, or 11.4 per 
cent of the entire population — that is, more than fourteen times as 
many persons were living in these big families as were living alone. 
In this respect Porto Rico differs widely from the United States, 
where only 6.6 per cent of the population lived in families of 11 or 
more members, and from the South Central states of America, where 
race conditions and agriculture are somewhat like those of Porto Rico, 
but where the proportion of population in families of more than 10 
members was the same as the average for the United States. 

As hotels, boarding-houses, and institutions are more common in 
cities than in the country, it may be that these large census families, 
like the very small ones, are more common in the cities. 

The following table tests the conjecture: 



District. 


Total popu- 
lation. 


Population 
in families 

of 11 + 
members. 


Per cent. 




75, 187 
878, 056 


11,061 
98, 239 


14.7 
11.1 







These very large families, therefore, were somewhat more common 
in the three cities of Porto Rico than they were in the rest of the 
island, a relation between city and country in which Porto Rico differs 
from Cuba, where large families are more common in the rural districts. 

On examining the three cities separately it appears that the high 
proportion of large families does not hold of Mayaguez, but only of 
San Juan and Ponce. In Mayaguez the proportion of population liv- 
ing in these large families was slightly less than the average in rural 
districts. 

The following table gives the same facts for the island by depart- 
ments: 



Department. 



Total popu- 
lation. 



Agnadilla 
Arecibo... 
Bayamon . 
Guayama. 
Humacao. 
Mayaguez 
Ponce 



99, 645 
162, 308 
160, 046 
111,986 

88, 501 
127,566 
203, 191 



Population 
in families 

of 11+ 

members 

each. 



11,242 
18, 703 
22, 294 
12, 685 
9,473 
11,395 
23, 508 



Per cent. 


11.2 


11.5 


13.9 


11.3 


10.7 


8.9 


11.5 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899. 



SIZE OF FAMILIES 



PERSONS TO 
A FAMILY 



15 PERCENTS 



PER CENTS 



A.Hoen& Co.Balto. Lith 



SIZE OF FAMILIES. 



101 



FAMILIES OF FROM TWO TO TEN MEMBERS. 

As Porto Rico has a much larger proportion of persons living in 
families of more than 10 members than the United States, and about 
the same proportion of persons living- in families of 1 member, it clearly 
must have a smaller proportion of persons living in families of from 
2 to 10 members, or what has been termed "natural" families. In 
Porto Rico about seven-eighths (87. 7 per cent) of the inhabitants are 
living in families of between 2 and 10 members. In this respect Porto 
Rico holds an intermediate position between Cuba, where 85.2 percent 
of the population were living in families of from 2 to 10 members, and 
the United States, where 92.6 per cent were so living. The proportion 
of population living in families of this size varies little from depart- 
ment to department, the proportions ranging from Bayamon, with 85.2 
per cent of its population living in natural families, to Mayaguez, where 
89.7 per cent were so living. 

Families having from 2 to 10 members may conveniently be subdi- 
vided into three classes: Small families — those having 2, 3, or 1 mem- 
bers; families of medium size— those having 5, (3, or 7 members; and 
large families — those having 8, 9, or 10 members. The members of 
natural families, or families having between 2 and 10 members, in each 
department have been thus subdivided with results shown in the fol- 
lowing table: 





Absolute number of persons in families of — 


Percentage of persons in fami- 
lies of 2 to 10 members liv- 
ing in — 


Department. 


2 to 10 
members. 


2 to 4 mem- 
bers, i.e., 

small 
families. 


5 to 7 mem- 
bers, i.e., 
families 

of medium 
size. 


8 to 10 
members, 
i.e., large 
families. 


Small 
families. 


Families 

of 

medium 

size. 


Large 
families. 


Aguadilla 


87, 871 
142, 645 
136, 352 
98,444 
78, 257 
114, 457 
178, 063 


22, 545 
39, 385 
36, 186 
27, 488 
21, 611 
37, 310 
48, 582 


40, 673 
63, 361 

60, 332 
44,455 
34, 887 
50, 569 
79, 199 


24, 653 
39, 899 
39, 834 
26, 501 
21, 759 
26, 578 
50, 282 


25.7 
27.6 
26.5 
27.9 
27.6 
32.6 
27.3 


46.3 
44.4 
44.3 
45.2 
44.6 
44.2 
44.5 


28.0 
28.0 




29.2 


Guayania 


26.9 
27.8 




23.2 




28.2 






Porto Rico 


836, 089 


233, 107 


373, 476 


229, 506 


27.9 


44.7 


27.4 



Apparently the size of families among white and colored in Porto 
Rico was about the same. For in the preceding table the percentages 
for Humacao, where there were most colored, differed little from 
those for Aguadilla, where there were most whites. 

Families of 2 to 4 members and families of 8 to 10 members each 
included about one-fourth of the total population living in families 
of from 2 to 10 members. Small families (2 to 1 members) were pro- 
portionately fewer than in Cuba, and large families (8 to 10 mem- 
bers) were more numerous. The families of medium size were also 
slightly more numerous than in Cuba. The departments differ but 



102 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



little among themselves. The most conspicuous divergence from the 
average is in the department of Mayaguez, where families of from 
2 to 4 members, like families of 1 member, are unusually numerous, 
and where large families (8 to 10 members) are correspondingly few. 
The following table shows the proportion of the total population of 
Porto Rico living in families of specified size, and for purposes of 
comparison columns have been added giving the same ratios for Culm 
and the United States: 



Number of members of family. 


Per cent of total population 
living in families of speci- 
fied number of members. 


Porto 
Rico. 


Cuba. 


United 
States 
(1890). 


1 


0.8 
4.3 
8.5 
11.6 
13.5 
13.5 
12.2 
10.2 
8.1 
5.8 
11.5 


1.9 

6.4 

9.8 

12.0 

12.6 

12.2 

10.9 

9.0 

7.0 

5.2 

13.0 


0.7 
5.3 
10.1 
15.3 
14.1 
13.6 
12.1 
9.6 
6.9 
5.6 
6.7 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8. 




10 


11+ 


Total 


100.0 
5.3 


100.0 
4.8 


100.0 
4.9 





In comparing Porto Rico with Cuba and the United States it appears 
that the average size of family is somewhat greater than in either of 
the other countries. Families of less than 5 members included in 
Porto Rico 25.2 per cent of the population, while in Cuba they 
included 30.1 per cent, and in the United States 31.1 per cent. On 
the other hand, families of 7. 8, 9, or 10 members were more common 
in Porto Rico than in either of the other countries. The fewness of 
small families and the many large families doubtless account for the 
greater average size of families on this island. 

SANITARY CONDITON OF HOUSES. 

[See Tables XXXII-XXXIV.] 

In the present census all buildings, whether occupied November 10, 
1899, or not, were reported by the enumerators, and the facts regard- 
ing the provisions in them for supplying water and for disposing of 
garbage and excreta were ascertained. Before proceeding to a discus- 
sion of these topics a brief analysis of this return of buildings may be 
made. 

The total number of buildings in Porto Rico, whether occupied or 
not, was 178,518, or 5.3 persons to a building. The average number 
of persons to a building, occupied or unoccupied, may be computed 
from those tables. The provinces range as follows: 



DWELLINGS. 



103 



Department. 



Population. 



Number of 
buildings. 



Persons 

to a 
building. 



Mayaguez 

Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Humacao 

Guayama 

Ponce 

Bayamon 

Porto Rico 



127, 566 
99, 645 
162, 308 
88, 501 
111, 986 
203, 191 
160, 046 



953, 243 



26, 616 
19, 842 
30, 751 
16, 997 
20,648 
37, 410 
26,254 



178, 518 



4.7 
5.0 
5.2 
5.2 
5.4 
5.4 
6.0 



5.3 



In Bayamon there were 6 persons to a building, while in Maj^aguez 
there were 4.7. In Cuba it was found that the proportion of persons 
to a building was greater in the cities than in the rural districts. To 
determine whether the same is true for Porto Rico, the following 
table has been constructed: 



District. 


Population. 


Number of 
buildings. 


Persons 

to a 
building. 




75, 187 
878, 056 


10, 283 
168, 235 


7.3 
5.2 







This table shows that in the three cities of Porto Rico there were 
on an average rather more than 7 persons to a building, while in the 
rest of Porto Rico there were about 5. That the three cities differ 
widely among themselves in this regard is shown by the following 
table: 



City. 



San Juan . . 
Mayaguez . 
Ponce 

Total 



Population. 



32,048 
15, 187 
27, 952 



Number of 
buildings. 



75, 187 



2,776 
2,522 
4,985 



10, 283 



Persons 

to a 
building. 



11.5 
6.0 
5.6 



From this it appears that there are about twice as many persons to 
a building in San Juan as in either of the other cities in the island, and 
more than twice the average number for the whole of Porto Rico. 
The number in San Juan is also decidedly greater than in Habana city, 
where there are 8.8 persons to a building. The reason for this crowded 
state of the population in San Juan is somewhat like that to which a 
similar condition is due in New York city, namely, location on an 
island of small area, with the resultant barriers to expansion of the 
population. 

Of the 178,518 buildings, 20,213, or nearly one-ninth, were unoccu- 
pied, a proportion slightly less than that in Cuba. The ratio of unoc- 



104 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF POBTO RICO, 1899. 



cupied buildings in the several departments varies, as is shown in the 
following- table: 



Department, 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



Total num- 
ber of 
buildings. 



19, 842 
30, 751 
26, 264 
20, 648 
16, 997 
26, 616 
37, 410 



178,518 



Number of 

unoccupied 

buildings. 

2, 056 
4,247 
2,415 
1,720 
1,541 
4,445 
3,789 



20, 213 



Per cent 
unoccu- 
pied. 

10.3 
13.8 
9.2 
8.3 
9.0 
16 7 
10.1 



11.3 



The minimum proportion is found in Guayama, where one building 
in twelve is unoccupied. The following table shows the figures for 
the three cities and the rest of the island: 



District, 


Number of 
buildings. 


Number of 
unoccupied 
buildings. 


Per cent. 




10, 283 
168, 235 


1,028 
19, 185 


9.9 
11.4 







From this it appears that the proportion of unoccupied buildings in 
the three cities of Porto Rico is somewhat, though not much, less than 
the proportion in the rural districts. The three cities differ consider- 
ably among themselves in this regard, Mayaguez having a much higher 
proportion than the average in the rural districts, while the other two 
have a lower rate. 

Passing to the occupied buildings or dwellings, one may examine 
the average number of persons to each. Here again only slight dif- 
ferences are found between the departments, Aguadilla having the 
lowest and Bayamon the highest proportion, as appears from the 
following table: 



Department. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



Population, 



99, 645 
162, 308 
160, 046 
111, 986 

88, 501 
127, 566 
203, 191 



953, 243 



Number of 
dwellings. 



17, 786 
26, 604 
23, 839 
18, 928 
15, 456 
22, 171 
33, 621 



158, 305 



Persons 

to a 
dwelling, 



5.6 
6.1 
6.7 
5.9 
5.7 
6.7 
6.0 



The following table shows the number of persons to a dwelling in 
the three cities and in the rest of Porto Rico: 



District. 



Population. 



Number of 
dwellings. 



Persons 

to a 
dwelling. 



Three cities 

Rest of Porto Rico. 



75, 187 

,s7,s,o. r >r> 



9,255 
149, 050 



8.1 
5.8 



DWELLINGS AND FAMILIES. 



105 



When the three cities are taken together, the persons to a building 
in them are more numerous than in the rest of the island, due largely 
to the influence of San Juan. To show that, the facts for the three 
cities are given separately in the following table: 



City. 



San Juan . . 
Mayaguez . 
Ponce 

Total 



Population. 



32, 048 
15, 187 
27, 952 



75, 187 



Number of 
dwellings. 



2,519 
2,107 
4,629 



Persons 

to a 

dwelling, 



12.7 
7.2 
6.0 



9, 255 



8.1 



It appears that the number of persons to a dwelling in Mayaguez 
city is not much higher, and in Ponce city no higher, than it is in the 
remainder of the respective departments, or in the island taken as a 
whole, while in San Juan the proportion is more than double that for 
the rest of the department or for all Porto Rico. 

DWELLINGS AND FAMILIES. 

By comparing the number of dwellings in Table XXXII with the 
number of families in Table XXXI, one may ascertain the ratio between 
census families and dwellings. Every dwelling contains at least one 
family, for, as already explained, one person living alone is for census 
purposes a family, and an unoccupied place of habitation is not a 
dwelling. As certain dwellings contain two or more families, the 
number of census families must exceed the number of dwellings. The 
figures for Porto Rico, compared with those for Cuba and the United 
States, are given below: 



Country. 


Number of 
families. 


Number of 
dwellings. 


Families 

to 100 
dwellings. 




181,594 

327, 965 

12, 690, 152 


158, 305 

262, 724 

11,483,318 


114 
125 
111 









From these figures it appears that there were more families to 100 
dwellings in Porto Rico than in the United States, but less than in 
Cuba. Still, if the figures for Habana be excluded, the number of 
persons to 100 dwellings in Cuba outside of Habana is found to be 
almost the same as the average for Porto Rico. 

In the following table the figures are given b}^ departments: 



Department. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



Number of 
families. 



18, 309 
30, 501 
29,544 
21,353 
16, 965 
26, 558 
38, 364 



181,594 



Number of 
dwellings. 



17, 786 
26, 504 
23, 839 
18, 928 
15, 456 
22, 171 
33, 621 



158, 305 



Families 

to 100 
dwellings. 



102 
115 
123 
112 
109 
119 
114 



114 



106 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



The high rate of Bay anion and the low rate of Aguadilla suggest 
that in the rural districts each family is more likely to have a dwelling 
to itself, while in the city we lind frequently more than one family to 
a dwelling. In the following table, therefore, the figures for the three 
cities and the rest of Porto Rico are given separately: 



District. 


Number of 
families. 


Number of 
dwellings. 


Families 

to 100 
dwellings. 




15, 821 
165, 773 


9,255 
149, 050 


171 
111 







It appears that the proportion of families to a dwelling in the three 
cities is much higher than it is in the rest of Porto Rico. 

In the following table the facts are given for the three cities sepa- 
ratety : 



City. 


Number of 
families. 


Number of 
dwellings. 


Families to 
100 dwell- 
ings. 




6,281 
3,647 
5,893 


2,519 
2,107 
4,629 


249 
173 

127 






Total 


15, 821 


9,255 


171 





From these figures it appears that in Ponce there is comparatively 
little crowding of two or more familes into a dwelling; that in Maya- 
guez there is more; but that in San Juan there are, on an average, 
about five families to every two dwellings, a proportion even higher 
than that in Habana city, and further indicative of the serious crowd- 
ing of population in the capital of Porto Rico. 

SOURCE OF WATER SUPPLY. 

The original source of water supply in Porto Rico, as elsewhere, is 
rainfall. This rain may fall on a building and be guided into and 
stored in a cistern, or may fall on and percolate through the ground 
either under or upon the surface. Flowing water may be obtained for 
human use as it comes to the surface either in a natural spring or an 
artificial well; or it may be obtained as it flows over the surface either 
in a natural water course or in an artificial water course or aqueduct. 
Accordingly, the census recognizes four sources of water supply, as 
follows: 

1. Cistern for rain water. 

2. Spring or well for ground water. 

3. Water from a natural stream. 

i. Water from an artificial aqueduct. 



WATER SUPPLY. 



107 



In Porto Rico these four sources are drawn upon for a water supply 
in the following- proportions: 



Source of water supply. 



Stream 

Cistern for rain water 

Aqueduct 

Spring or well 

Not specified 

Total 



Number of 
dwellings 
supplied 

from source 
named. 



85, 348 
55, 093 
9,393 
7,896 

575 



158, 305 



Per cent of 

total 
dwellings. 



About one-third of the Porto Rican buildings are supplied with 
water from cisterns, and more than one-half from streams, or nearly 
nine-tenths from these two sources combined. About one-seventeenth 
of the dwellings are supplied from aqueducts and one-twentieth from 
wells. 

In comparison with Cuba, the use of cisterns is much less common, 
while streams are relied upon by almost twice as many houses. The 
stream as a source of water, it will be noticed, requires less initial 
expenditure of labor than the cistern, well, or aqueduct. Aqueducts 
supply only about one-third the proportion of houses in Porto Rico 
that they do in Cuba. 

Per cent of divellings obtaining water from source named. 



Department. 



Aguadilla . 

Arecibo 

Bayamon . . 
Guayama.. 
Humacao.. 
Mayaguez . 
Ponce 

Total 



Stream. 



Cistern. 



Aque- 
duct. 



wpH Not speci- 
fied. 



The preceding table shows that the use of cisterns is most common 
in the north and west, and least common in the east and south, the pro- 
portion varying from one-sixth in Ponce to more than two-thirds in 
Aguadilla. 

Reliance upon streams, on the other hand, is most common in the 
east and south, and least common in the north and west, the proportion 
varying from one-fourth in Aguadilla to two-thirds in Ponce, Huma- 
cao, and Guayama. 

Aqueducts are a supply of little importance, except in Mayaguez 
and Ponce, where slightly more than one house in ten gets its water 
supply from this source. 

Wells are also little used in most of the departments, but in Baya- 
mon about one house in seven uses them. 



108 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Aqueducts are the principal source of water supply in the cities of 
Mayaguez and Ponce, but not apparently in San Juan, where the 
greater part of the population — nearly two-thirds— rely upon wells. 

The following notes on the water supply of the three large Porto 
Rican cities have been gleaned from various sources: 



"The city is poorly supplied with water. There is a good spring on the island of 
Miraflores, but within the city there are only cisterns for rain water and a scanty 
source in the well of San Cristobal castle. There is another good well in the neigh- 
borhood of San Antonio bridge." Delitsch, p. 1931a [1871]. 

"There is no running water in the town. The entire population depends upon rain 
water caught upon the flat roofs of the buildings and conducted to the cistern, which 
occupies the greater part of the inner courtyard, that is an essential part of Spanish 
houses the world over, but that here, on account of the crowded 1 conditions, is very 
small. There is no sewerage except for surface water and sinks, while vaults are in 
every house and occupy whatever remaining space there may be in the patios not 
taken up by the cistern. The risk of contamination to the water is very great, and 
in dry seasons the supply is entirely exhausted." R. T. Hill, Cuba and Porto Rico, 
p. 176 [1898.] 

"In the few months of American occupancy water from the works in process of 
construction by the Spanish, for several years, has been brought into the city." 
Carroll, Report on. Porto Rico, p. 210. 

' ' Nine miles from San Juan, by the military road, near the little town of Rio Piedras, 
there is a piece of engineering just approaching completion which is to result in fur- 
nishing the capital of Porto Rico with a much-needed water supply. * * * 

"It is calculated that within four months San Juan will be able to dispense with the 
questionable supply of rain water in cisterns, to which may be attributed a portion 
of the sickness developed, which will be replaced by well filtered water drawn from 
an uncontaminated source far up in the mountain ravines. 

' ' This has been practically accomplished by damming a mountain stream, at normal 
periods some thirty feet in width, by a substantial wall of masonry twenty feet high. 
American engineers would pronounce this portion of the work defective, in that 
along the low flood-plains to the left of the stream there are no extension retaining- 
walls, and hence all flood waters rush around the unprotected end of the dam. The 
monetary loss, when the spring waters cut a new stream-bed, as they will, over the 
alluvial plain, will be of small moment as compared to the distress which will be 
caused by the temporary cutting off of the water-supply from a city whose people 
have become educated to the use of water from faucets. 

"Beyond this primary objection to the work as it stands, it may be said that the 
undertaking has been well and ably executed, under the direction of Spanish 
engineers, including, as it does, settling basins, sand Alters, pumping basins, steam 
lifting pumps, primary receiving reservoirs, and secondary distributing reservoirs. 

"It is estimated that this plant is capable of raising and distributing two million 
gallons of water in twelve hours, with one set of pumps in action. 

"All the great basins have been built by throwing up a massive surrounding- wall 
of earth, and erecting against this a stone wall four feet in thickness, finished with a 
cement lining. The stone used in their construction is a fine-grained blue lime- 
stone brought from the mountains within a mile and a half of Rio Piedras. As 
a building-stone, it is said to be excellent. It is worked, however, with some 
difficulty. * * * 

"The water comes from the dam through a twenty-four inch pipe to two settling 
basins, which arc used alternately, and it is here held for twenty-four hours, until the 
major portion of the foreign matter has precipitated. 



DISPOSITION OF GARBAGE. 



109 



' ' Provision is made at the lower end of these basins to flow off the water into the 
stream. * * * 

"From the settling basins, it is flowed into great duplicate filter basins, which have 
a bed covering of four feet of coarse sand; the water passes through these beds of sand 
into the final pumping basin. 

"In the event of any trouble with the filter beds, it is possible to flow the water, by- 
side trenches with cemented walls, around the filter basin, directly into the pumping 
pits. The pumps are direct-coupled, and the engines are of the condensing type, 
manufactured by a Glasgow firm. 

"The primary reservoir is situated one hundred and sixty feet above the pumps, 
and is a work of beauty. The walls are of rough masonry, topped with a handsome 
stone fence. The center of this great basin, holding three million seven hundred 
thousand gallons, is divided by a median wall, and the valve-house is situated at one 
side of this division. 

"A twenty-inch main pipe leads into the city. * * * The total cost of the 
completed plant with the water in the mains, it is said, will be somewhat over six 
hundred thousand pesos. " Dinwiddie, Porto Rico, p. 185-187 [1899]. 



"Water for all purposes, including the fire department, is amply supplied by an 
aqueduct," Hill, p. 178. 

"Ponce has the merit of an admirable water supply." Carroll, p. 210. 

"There are waterworks supplying an abundance of good, potable water." Din- 
widdie, p. 189. 

MAYAGUEZ. 

"The city has excellent waterworks." Hill, p. 179. 

' ' The water for the city is brought from a mountain torrent two miles away in the 
foot-hills, and is good and abundant." Dinwiddie, p. 193. 

' ' Its water supply is excellent, requiring only proper filtration to make it acceptable. 
* * * The city council has voted a considerable appropriation for the improve- 
ment of its waterworks, and a comprehensive system of sewerage is a probability of 
the near future." Carroll, p. 209. 

DISPOSITION OF GARBAGE. 

The enumerators were instructed to write in the column foj answers 
to this question " Municipal " (municipal), "Particular" (private), or 
"Se quema" (by burning), according- to the method of disposition used 
at the dwelling where the question was put. In addition to these three 
classes it was necessary to introduce a fourth for unspecified or insuf- 
ficiently specified, but less than 1 per cent of the houses fell into 
this last class. The facts for Porto Rico as a whole are shown in the 
following table: 



Method of disposing of garbage. 



Municipal .. 

Burning 

Private 

Not specified 

Total. . 



Number of 

dwellings so 

reporting. 



20, 194 


13 


24, 637 


15 


112, 347 


71 


1,127 


1 



158, 305 



Per cent 

of all 
dwellings. 



110 



REPORT OlS" THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Of the total dwellings in Porto Rico about one-eighth were provided 
with some municipal means of disposing of garbage, and the inhabi- 
tants of rather more than one-seventh used burning as a method of 
disposition. In substantially all the remainder — that is, in more than 
seven-tenths of the dwellings on the island — the inhabitants reported 
private means of disposition other than burning. 

Among the departments, municipal disposition of garbage was most 
common in those at the eastern end of the island, Guayama and 
Humacao, and least common in those at the northwest, Aguadilla and 
Arecibo. 

Burning was much more common in Ponce and Humacao than else- 
where, the other five departments all falling below the average for 
the island in this respect. 

Per cent of urban dwellings using specified method of garbage disposal. 



City. 



Mayaguez . 

Ponce 

San Juan . . 

Total 



Municipal. 



64 



Burning. 



Private. 



Not speci- 
fied. 



In the three cities, as shown above, between half and two-thirds of 
the dwellings were provided with some municipal disposition of gar- 
bage, and in Ponce and San Juan the residents of about one-fourth of 
the dwellings were reported as disposing of their garbage by burning. 

DISPOSITION OF EXCRETA. 

The entries which the enumerators were allowed to make in the col- 
umn containing the answers to this question were "pozo," "inodoro," 
or "ninguna" (none). In addition to the three thus allowed, there 
will be found in the tables a fourth class of "not specified," to cover 
cases where the question was not answered. The only recognized 
methods of disposal, therefore, were pozo and inodoro. As it is diffi- 
cult to find any exact English equivalent for these words, they will be 
retained in the following discussion of the tables. 1 In Table XXXIV 
pozo has been translated as cesspool and inodoro as sewer, but these 
English words are not exact equivalents of the Spanish terms they 
render. 

x The inodoro includes every receptacle for excreta in which an effort is made to 
destroy or decrease the foul odors arising therefrom, usually hy the addition of such 
substances as lime, dry clay, or ashes. The pozo includes all other forms of closet. 
The modern form of closet flushed by water from a system of pipes, called escusado 
ingles, is very unusual in Porto Rico. Either the inodoro or the pozo is cleaned, when 
it is cleaned at all, by scavengers hired by the property owner. 



DISPOSITION OF EXCRETA. 



Ill 



The following table shows the frequency of these various modes of 
disposal: . 



Mode of disposing of excreta. 


Number of 
dwellings 
using it in 
Porto Rico. 


Per cent 

of total 

dwellings. 




120, 924 

34, 829 

1,181 

1,371 


76 

22 

1 

1 


Pozo 




Not specified 


Total 


158, 305 


100 





More than three-fourths of the dwellings in Porto Rico have no pro- 
vision of any kind for this purpose. It is said that in rural Spain the 
inhabitants commonly have no closets or outhouses, but resort to the 
fields, and the same is apparently true of Porto Rico. Of the houses 
having conveniences of this sort, over nineteen-twentieths (96.7 per 
cent) reported a, pozo and less than one-twentieth (3.3 per cent) an ino- 
doro. In this respect the departments stand as follows : 

Per cent of total dwellings supplied with specified mode of disposal of excreta. 



Department. 



Aguadilla . 
Arecibo ... 
Bayamon.. 
Guayama.. 
Humacao. . 
Mayaguez . 
Ponce 

Total 



Pozo. 



Inodoro. 



No form. 



Not 
specified, 



I 



2 



2 



1 



It is clear that except in the three departments containing large 
cities the Inodoro is practically unknown. In the following table the 
facts are given for the three cities separately reported: 

Per cent of urban dwellings using specified method of disposing of excreta. 



City. 


Pozo. 


Inodoro. 


No form. 


Not 
specified. 




75 
79 
71 


6 
4 
11 


18 
16 
18 


1 
1 





San Juan 


Total 


76 


6 


17 


1 





This table shows that in San Juan an inodoro was found in a little 
more than one-tenth of the dwellings, but that in the other two cities 
it occurred in only about one dwelling in twenty. In the three cities 
one house in six, on an average, was without closet conveniences. 

In the following table the facts are given for the rural districts of 



112 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



the three departments containing these cities, i. e., for the three 
departments outside of these cities: 

Per cent of rural dwellings using specified method of disposing of excreta. 



Rural districts of- 



Bayamon 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Total rural 



Pozo. 



,doro. No form. N ° n ^ eci - 



79 



In these rural districts there was a pozo in connection with less than 
one-fifth of the dwellings, while nearly four-fifths were without this or 
any other form of receiving excreta. 

VITAL STATISTICS, 1888-1898, INCLUSIVE. 

[See Tables XXXV-XXXVIL] 

In connection with the present census a careful and accurate report 
was received at the office of the Director, giving the number of births, 
deaths, and marriages registered in each municipal district of Porto 
Rico for each calendar year from 1888 to 1898, inclusive, and, in the 
case of births and deaths, with distinction of sex. In the report the 
districts are arranged alphabetically, but for purposes of analysis they 
have been assembled by departments. In this form the figures are 
included in the present volume, and those for the several departments 
are here introduced from pages 315-351: 

Deaths in Porto Rico, 1888-1898, by departments. 



Department. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


1893. 1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


Total. 


Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon — 
Guayama — 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 


2, 731 

4,025 
2,912 
2, 652 
2, 760 
4,596 
5, 892 


3,058 
4,181 
3,092 
3,301 

:■;,:;< is 
3, 982 
5,333 


2, 566 
4,103 
3, 420 
3,395 
3,147 
4,831 
5,493 


2,505 
3,607 
3,319 
2,768 
2, 904 
3, 996 
4,990 


2,476 
4,151 
3,352 

2,388 
3,082 
4,018 
5,007 


2,158 
3, 571 
3,176 
2,195 
2,506 
3, 227 
4,783 


2,606 
4,069 
3,482 
2, 861 
2,671 
3,812 
5,395 


2,660 
4, 578 
4,186 
2, 722 
2, 669 
4,402 
5,067 


2,699 
4,586 
3,447 
2, 927 
3,067 
3,954 
4,755 


2,770 
5,113 
4,580 
4,304 
4,545 
4,390 
6,278 


3,579 
6,206 
3,819 
4,344 
3, 584 
5,347 
6,735 


29, 808 
48, 190 
38, 785 
33, 857 
34, 243 
46, 555 
59, 728 


Porto Rico . 


25, 568 


26, 255 


26, 955 


24,089 


24, 474 


21, 616 


24, 896 


26,284 


25,435 


31, 980 


33, 614 


291,166 



Births in Porto Rico, 1888-1898, by departments. 



Department. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


Total. 


Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 


2,676 
1,682 

3,408 
3,089 
2,862 
i,:;-.r. 
6,291 


2,247 
4,647 
3,101 
2,944 
2, 610 
3,738 
5,826 


2,544 
4,209 
2,910 
2,703 
2, 168 
3,807 
5,890 


2,368 
4,407 
3,003 
2,390 
2,052 
3,742 
5,534 


2,548 
5, 176 
3, 036 
2,448 
2,353 
3,719 
6,022 


2,499 
4,507 
3, 251 
2,862 
2,322 
4,039 
5,977 


2,516 
4,526 
2, 970 
2,613 
2,526 
4,073 
5,324 


2,524 
5, 154 
2, 789 
2, 594 
2, 681 
3,961 
5,387 


2,754 
5,663 
2,660 
2, 430 
3,118 
4,067 
5,578 


2,625 
5,364 
2,774 
2,049 
2,630 
4,124 
6,261 


2,087 
3, 652 
2,216 
2, 077 
1,902 
3,221 
4,564 


27, 388 
51, 987 
32, 118 
28, 199 
27, 224 
42,884 
62,654 


Porto Rico . 


27, 401 


25, 113 


24, 231 


23, 496 


25,302 


25, 457 


24, 548 


25, 090 


26, 270 


25, 827 


19,719 


272, 454 



VITAL STATISTICS. 

Marriages in Porto Rico, 1888-1898, by departments. 



113 



Department. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


Total. 


Aguadilla 


485 


450 


595 


648 


626 


572 


556 


673 


657 


532. 


390 


6,184 


Arecibo 


845 


484 


855 


624 


666 


841 


734 


956 


822 


857 


487 


8,171 


Bavamon 


304 


375 


577 


469 


550 


601 


475 


587 


549 


445 


428 


5,360 


Guavama 


327 


205 


383 


358 


435 


496 


404 


380 


427 


393 


315 


4,123 


Humacao 


151 


126 


252 


224 


277 


367 


285 


283 


229 


241 


294 


2,729 


Mavaguez 


278 


232 


586 


743 


691 


621 


864 


711 


628 


477 


362 


6,093 


Ponce 


899 


529 


831 


828 


751 


799 


616 


675 


561 


784 


452 


7,725 


Porto Rico . 


3,289 


2,401 


4,079 


3,894 


3,996 


4, 297 


3,934 


4, 265 


3,773 


3,729 


2,728 


40, 385 



The first question which arises regarding such tables as the pre- 
ceding is, How accurate and complete are the figures? The table 
received by the Director of the Census was entirely free from arith- 
metical errors, and in the course of analysis only one slight defect — a 
transposition of two numbers — was detected. But this does not vouch 
for the completeness of the original records, of which this table is a 
summary. In default of opportunity to examine the law and admin- 
istration of Porto Rico in such matters, one is compelled, in determin- 
ing the probabilities of the case, to rely upon internal evidence. For 
this purpose one must compare the proportion between the recorded 
births and deaths and the population, and ascertain whether these pro- 
portions, the so-called death rates and birth rates, agree with the 
known probabilities under such conditions as prevail in Porto Rico. 
In order to estimate the population, it has been assumed that the inhab- 
itants increased by an equal number each year between 1887 and 1899 — 
an assumption sufficiently accurate for the purpose in hand. 

DEATHS AND DEATH RATES. 

The total population of Porto Rico for each year, and the deaths and 
death rates, or average number of persons dying to each thousand of 
the estimated population, were as given in the following table: 

Death rates, 1888-1898. 



y I Estimated 
population. 


Deaths 
reported. 


Death 
rates. 


1888 


811,454 
824, 344 
837, 234 
850, 124 
863, 014 
875, 903 
888, 793 
901, 683 
914, 573 
927, 463 
940, 353 


25,568 
26, 255 
26T 955 
24, 089 
24, 474 
21,616 
24, 896 
26,284 
25,435 
31,980 
33, 614 


31.5 
31.8 
32.1 
28.3 
28.3 
24.6 
28.0 
29.1 
27.8 
34.4 
35.7 


1889 


I 1890 


; i89i 


! 1892 


I 1893 


1 1894 


1 1895 


! 1896 


I 1897 


1898 


Average for 11 years 


875, 903 


26, 469 


30.2 



If these figures may be trusted, it appears that about 3 per cent of 
the population of Porto Rico die each year. If the population of 
Porto Rico were what is known as stationary — that is, neither increas- 
ing nor decreasing year by year in total numbers, and experiencing no 
8490—00 -8 



114 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



loss or gain from emigration or immigration — and 3 per cent died each 
year, it is clear that a number equal to the total population of the 
island would have died at the end of thirty -three and one-third years. 
This does not imply that every person on the island would die on 
reaching that age, but does imply that the persons dying below the 
age of 33^ years would be equal in number to those dying above that 
age, and, consequently, that a child born in Porto Rico would have an 
even chance of reaching 33^ years before its death. This is what is 
sometimes called by statisticians the expectation of life. In such a 
stationary population, also, there would be as many persons below as 
above 33^ years — that is, the median age of the population would be 
33^ years. Now, it has already appeared from the analysis of the age 
figures of Porto Rico (page 47) that the median age is not 33i, but 
18.1 years. A part of this difference is due to the fact that the popu- 
lation of Porto Rico is increasing rather than stationary. But this 
increase is far from sufficient to account for the difference between the 
observed median age of the population and the median age estimated 
on the assumption of a stationary population and a death rate of 30 
per annum. The only obvious wa} T of escaping the difficulty is to 
assume that the true death rate in Porto Rico must be somewhat higher 
than the death rate of 30 obtained from the analysis of the figures, 
and that many deaths have occurred on the island which have not been 
entered in the registers or reported to this office. 

Another line of argument may be offered tending to the same result. 
Porto Rico has been gaining but little by immigration, and nearly all 
of its increase has been by excess of births over deaths. This increase, 
however, for the last few decades, has been but little more than 1.5 
per cent per annum. If one can ascertain approximately the births 
in Porto Rico each year and their ratio to population, one may ascer- 
tain indirectly the probable number of deaths. Now, two censuses, 
those of 1860 and 1899, have reported the number of children under 
1 year of age in Porto Rico. They are the survivors of the children 
born within the preceding twelve months. In the following table these 
two are compared with the total population reported by the census: 

Per cent of population, under 1 year of age. 



Census. 


Total popu- 
lation. 

583, 308 
953, 243 


Population 

under 1 
year of age. 


Per cent. 


1860 


16, 833 
26, 309 


2.8 
2.7 


1899 





These figures indicate a birth rate for Porto Rico of at least 27 per 
thousand population, but two considerations warrant the belief that the 
true birth rate must be much higher than this. In the first place, no 
account has been taken of the number of children who were born and 



VITAL STATISTICS. 115 

then died in Porto Rico in the year preceding the census day. From 
all that is known of the conditions on the island, one may assume that 
this proportion was very high. Where ignorance, poverty, and unsani- 
tary conditions prevail, it is not at all uncommon for one-fourth 
of all the children born to die during their first year of life. If one 
assumes that this is true in Porto Rico, the true birth rate would be 35 
or 36 instead of 30. That this is not an exaggerated estimate of the true 
birth rate is perhaps indicated by the fact that Spain, for the years 
1865-1869, reported an average birthrate of 36.7, for the years 1878- 
1880 an average birth rate of 35.7, and for the years 1887-1888 an 
average rate of 36.3. All that one knows of Porto Rican conditions 
indicates that the birth rate on that island must be decidedly higher 
than it is in Spain. 

A second cause for thinking the birth rate in Porto Rico to be much 
higher than 27 is found in the general tendency of parents, in report- 
ing the ages of young children, to overstate them. For this reason the 
number of children under 1 becomes erroneously small by the transfer 
of many infants really belonging in that class into the class of children 
1 or even 2 years old. From Table IX it will be noticed that the chil- 
dren in Porto Rico 2, 3, and 1 years old, November 10, 1899, were much 
more numerous than those under 1. Such a relation, if it existed, 
could be due only to an abnormally low birth rate for the preceding 
year or a very high infant mortality affecting mainly the children 
under 1. Neither of these assumptions seems so probable as that a 
considerable number of Porto Rican children belonging to the first 
year of life have been transferred, as often happens, to the later age 
periods. When one considers that Saxony, Russia in Europe, and 
Roumania have a birth rate of between 40 and 50 per annum, it seems 
probable that the true birth rate of Porto Rico must be as high as 40 
per annum, and that the true death rate is nearer 40 than 30, while 
both birth rate and death rate may not improbably rise above 40. On 
the whole, therefore, it is not probable that the births and deaths 
recorded in the preceding tables included all or nearly all of those 
which occurred in Porto Rico. Still, inferences may perhaps be derived 
from the figures, notwithstanding the admission that they are imperfect 
and incomplete. 

From the table showing deaths and death rates in Porto Rico year by 
year it appears that these have varied quite widely from a minimum 
rate of 24.6 to a maximum of 35.7. The rates at the beginning and 
end of the period of eleven years were much higher than for several 
years in the middle of the series. The variations, however, have not 
been sharp, being in nowise comparable with those shown in Cuba for 
the same period. 



110 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



In the following- table the death rates are given by departments for 
each year: 

Death rates in Porto Rico, 1888-1898, by departments. 



Year. 


Aguadilla. 


Arccibo. 


Bayamon. 


Guayama. 


Humacao. 


Mayaguez. 


Ponce. 


1888 


31.3 
34.6 
28.6 
27.6 
26.9 
23.2 
27.7 
27.9 
28.0 
28.4 
36.3 


31.6 
32.0 
38.1 
26.3 
29.6 
24.9 
27.7 
30.6 
30.0 
32.7 
38.9 


23.3 
24.3 
26.4 
25.3 
25.1 
23.4 
25.3 
30.0 
24.3 
31.9 
26.2 


26.9 
33.1 
33.7 
27.1 
23.1 
21.0 
27.0 
25.4 
27.0 
39.3 
39.2 


29.4 
35.0 
33.0 
30.3 
31.9 
25. 8 
27.3 
27.1 
30.9 
45.6 
35.7 


39.3 
33.7 
40.6 
33.3 
33.2 
26.4 
31.0 
35.5 
31.7 
34.9 
42.2 


36.1 


1889 

1890 


82. 
32 2 


1891 


28.6 


1892 


28 1 


1893 

1894 


26.3 
29.1 


1895 




1896 

1897 

1898 


24.7 
32.0 
33. 7 






Average. . 


29.1 


30.5 


26.0 


29.4 


32.0 34. 7 29.9 



These departments do not vary widely from the average for the 
island, nor does it appear that any one or more of the departments 
suffered severely while the remainder were unaffected. In one case, 
in the year 1897, it would seem that the eastern end of the island, 
Humacao, Guayama, and Bayamon suffered and the death rate rose, 
while in the other four departments this did not occur. In 1893 nearly 
all the departments seem to have had a comparatively low death rate, 
while in 1890 the death rate in two of the western departments, Maya- 
guez and Arecibo, was unusually high. One is somewhat surprised 
to find the average rate for Mayaguez running higher than in the other 
departments, and the suspicion arises that this may be due to more 
accurate records rather than to a rate really above the average. 

BIRTHS AND BIRTH RATES. 

The following table gives the birth rates for Porto Rico as a whole, 
by single years: 

Birth rates in Porto Rico, 1888-1898. 



Year. 


Population. 


Births. 


Birth 
rates. 


1888 


811,454 
824,344 
837, 234 
850, 124 
863, 014 
875, 903 
888, 793 
901, 683 
914.573 
927, 463 
940, 353 


27, 401 
25, 113 
24, 231 
23, 496 
25, 302 
25, 457 
24, 548 
25, 090 
26, 270 
25, 827 
19, 719 


33.7 
30.4 
28.9 
27.6 
29.3 
29.0 
27.6 
27.8 
28.7 
27.8 
19.9 


1889 


1890 


1891 


1892 


1893 


1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 




875, 903 


24, 768 


28. 2 





One notices that, on the average, the registered number of births to 
a thousand persons is less than the registered number of deaths to a 
thousand persons. As Porto Rico has been gaining but little by immi- 
gration in recent years, this apparent inference from the tables must 
be rejected as incorrect and interpreted as evidence of omissions in the 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



117 



birth records. In nearly all countries omissions of births occur much 
more frequently than omissions of deaths. The birth rate in Arecibo 
and Mayaguez is higher than elsewhere, a condition which leads one 
again to suspect that the figures for Mayaguez are probably more 
accurate and careful than those kept by the other departments. Much 
the lowest birth rate in the island is found in Bay anion. 

It is probable that the proportion of children under 5 in 1899 to the 
total population would vary from department to department in rough 
agreement with the variations in true birth rate during the preceding 
3 r ears. That they do not thus vary is indicated by the following list: 

Departments arranged in the order of 
Increasing proportion of population, 0-4: Increasing birthrate, 189i')-1898: 

Mayaguez. Bayamon. 

Ponce. Humacao. 

Bayamon. Guayama. 

Arecibo. Aguadilla. 

Aguadilla. Ponce. 

Humacao. Mayaguez. 

Guayama. Arecibo. 

From these figures one's belief is strengthened that the differences 
in birth rate and death rate are due primarily to differences in the 
accuracy of registration rather than to differences of actual rate. 

MARRIAGES AND MARRIAGE RATES. 

The proportion of marriages to population in Porto Rico, is so low 
as to make the figures insignificant. One notices from the table (p. 113) 
that marriages were apparently much more numerous during the years 
from 1890 to 1895 than during the two years before or after that time. 
This may be an indication that the economic conditions on the island 
were somewhat worse during the earlier and the later parts of the 
eleven-year period than they were in the intervening time, but beyond 
this scarcely any inferences from the table seem warranted. 

In the following table the departments are arranged in the order of 
the average marriage rate for the eleven years, and in the second col- 
umn the proportion of white to the total population is stated: 



Department. 


Average 
marriage 
rate for 
11 years. 


Propor- 
tion of 
white to 

total 
popula- 
tion. 


Humacao 


3.5 
3.6 
3.8 
4.5 
5.1 
6.0 


46.1 
50.7 
48.9 
59.6 
64.3 
77.1 
85.6 


Guayama 


Bavamon 


Ponce 




Arecibo 







It will be noticed that, with a slight exception in the case of Guayama, 
the two columns vary concomitantly. This confirms what was also 
shown by the figures for marital condition, that lawful marriage is 
much more common among the white population than among the colored. 



AGRICULTURE. 

While agriculture is now the principal source of wealth to Porto Rico, 
the early settlers were for many years engaged in cattle raising, and 
this is still an important industry, the rich and luxuriant pastures and 
many streams providing all that is necessary for this purpose. It may 
be said that all fruits and vegetables adapted to a tropical climate will 
yield abundantly in Porto Rico, and this is especially true of the coffee 
tree, the sugar cane, and the tobacco plant, the three staples of most 
importance in the order named, and grown widely over the island. 

The following reports, prepared especially for the census by Senors 
M. Badrena, supervisor of the department of Mayaguez; Ricardo 
Hernandez, supervisor of the department of Bayamon, and M. Pla- 
nella, of Cayey, give interesting facts concerning the history and culti- 
vation of coffee, sugar, and tobacco. They are printed substantially 
as received. 

COFFEE. 

Report of Sefior Ricardo Hernandez. 

"The coffee plant is a shrub 2 or 3 meters high with permanent leaves, 
a delicate, flexible trunk of some 6 centimeters in diameter, with oppo- 
site and alternate ramifications forming crosses. It generally bifur- 
cates at the surface of the ground, giving the appearance of two or 
three plants being joined together. This is due to the fact that each 
grain of coffee gives origin to two plants. The system of cultivation 
has limited the development of the height to the point above indicated, 
but in Arabia and in some parts of America where the tree is allowed 
to grow freely, the coffee becomes a thick tree with sharp lanceolate 
erect leaves, dark green in color, permanent, thick, and smooth. 

"The blossom of the coffee is white, fragrant, and resembles the jas- 
mine blossom, with five stamens grouped together and implanted in 
the axila of the leaves; tubular corolla, small globulous calyx with live 
teeth. 

"The fruit is oblong, fleshy, resembling the cherry, bright green in 
color, which on ripening turns to an intense red, and contains in the 
interior the seed composed of two coriaceous plano-convex discs, so 
firmly united at their plane surfaces that they sometimes break before 
separating. 

"The coffee has a central or tap root which penetrates the ground 
about 80 centimeters, and also many secondary rootlets near the 
surface.' 1 
lis 



CULTIVATION OF COFFEE. 119 

SUITABLE CLIMATE. 

"In Porto Rico the select and renowned coffee is produced between 
200 and 800 meters above the sea level. At this elevation are found 
the towns of Yauco, Lares, Maricao, Utuado, Cayey, etc., which 
form the productive region of the renowned coffee of Porto Rico. 
This region, which includes something more than the southwest quad- 
rant of the island, is characterized by a climate of perpetual spring. 
The constant breeze refreshes the atmosphere and the frequent rains 
equalize the seasons so that not even in times of drought does the vege- 
tation suffer as occurs on the southern coast of the island, nor during 
the rainy season are the rains so heavy as on the north coast. Owing 
to these favorable climatic conditions and to the fact that the coffee 
groves are situated in valleys sheltered from the strong winds, and the 
soil, of which we will presently speak in detail, is due the enviable 
reputation of the coffee of the country. 

"In the central range of Porto Rico is the Sierra Luquilla, which 
has an elevation of 1,500 meters above the level of the sea, and it is 
observed that above the middle height of this mountain coffee groves 
do not exist. Whether owing to the climate or to the soil, which may 
be unsuitable, where only grow some shrubs in thickets and some 
worthless herbs, it is true that after 800 meters have been passed the 
coffee is not seen, and all attempts to grow it at that altitude have 
been without results. 

"Coffee growers modify the climate by employing shade, that is, 
they plant their coffee groves beneath the shade of a grove of thick 
trees, as, for example, the hucares, guaba, jobo, gumma, mango, etc., 
and under the banana trees when the coffee groves are young. 

SUITABLE SOIL. 

"The coffee grows on hills of low elevation, associated with many 
other trees, which afford shade, modify the temperature, and protect 
the coffee from the hurricanes and torrential rains. 

"The composition of these coffee soils is variable, but in all of them 
sand predominates and on the surface there is an abundant covering 
the product of the decayed vegetation of the forest. 

"The land which produces the renowned coffee of Porto Rico, as to 
its physical appearance, seems to be a very fine clay, and when it rains 
becomes as slippery as soap, and transit at such times is dangerous. 
It has a red color when moist, and when squeezed through the fingers 
resembles in its color and smoothness the oxide of iron paint, but when 
dry it becomes very hard. 



120 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



CULTIVATION OF COFFEE. 



"The method employed in Porto Rico and other points for the grow- 
ing and multiplication of coffee, by utilizing the plants which spring 
up from the seed which falls alone or is lost at gathering time, must 
be superseded by another method more certain, employing seed set 
apart for the purpose. 

"In order to make seed beds, a place is selected with a slightly 
inclined surface, or at least one which will not become swampy or 
muddy and which has a good layer of vegetable soil, and it is worked 
or spaded until the same is well pulverized. It is cleared of all roots, 
stones, etc., and if the land be not sufficiently fertile it is enriched 
with common barnyard manure. After this has been done, in the 
month of February, the sowing takes place, for which purpose coffee 
grains in the berry or husk are selected which can be seen to have 
unusual size and weight, and which give signs of being perfectly 
formed, and they are planted at a depth of 3 centimeters. The 
grains are planted with the finger, or, as is more convenient, with a 
stick, and after being placed in the hole are covered with earth, which 
is pressed down with the hand. The planting should be in rows sepa- 
rated from each other a distance of about 15 centimeters, and the dis- 
tance between each planted grain should be the same. In about 
twenty days the new coffee plants will commence to spring up, and 
they are allowed to remain for a year or a 3*ear and a half, when they 
will have acquired a height of about 80 centimeters or have three 
crosses, at which time they may be transplanted to the site determined 
upon for the coffee grove. 

"The care of the seed beds during this time is limited to clearing it 
of weeds and taking measures to prevent the winds from injuring the 
tender plants, because if they are seen to turn black or take on a burnt 
color the center or stock of the little plant will cease to grow. They 
may be protected from the winds by making palisades or shelters of 
boards, palm leaves, cane, bamboo, etc. 

" When the small plants have acquired the height indicated, the lower 
and middle branches are cut off, leaving only the cross branches in 
order that the trunk may grow straight and clean, and its top or 
branching commence at the height most convenient for the work of 
gathering the crop. 

"Some days after this pruning the trees are taken up from the seed 
bed, using for this purpose a narrow spade, which is thrust into the 
earth near the foot of the tree to a depth equal to the length of the 
roots, and then by gently employing the necessary force, the tree is 
taken out with all its roots intact, and with a clod of earth which it 
is necessary to preserve, so that the roots may remain covered and 
insure a new rooting when transplanted. 



CULTIVATION OF COFFEE. 121 

' ' When the trees taken up have very long tap roots, say of 20 cen- 
timeters, it is well to cut off the lower half with a pair of scissors. 

PLANTING. 

"The first necessary condition which land intended for a coffee grove 
must have is that it be protected from the full force of the constant 
and tempestuous winds; thus ravines, points protected by a mountain 
or masses of vegetation, those exposed to the south, etc., possess these 
conditions. The land must also be sloping or high, so that the rains 
shall never form pools or mud holes. 

"The preparation of the land consists in the labors necessary to pul- 
verize the ground, turn the earth over, thoroughly cleaning it of roots, 
stones, etc., and making the holes which are to receive the young- 
plants. 

"The planting or setting out of the plants is done in the following 
manner: 

"On the land plowed and cleaned equidistant lines are marked out, 
2\ meters from each other, and along this line, at intervals of 2% 
meters, holes are dug 45 centimeters long, 45 centimeters wide, and 
45 centimeters deep. The superficial earth is placed to the right of 
the hole, and the lower earth, or subsoil, to the left, the latter being 
thoroughly mixed with a kilogram of barnyard manure. 

"Eight days after the holes have been dug the plant is set out, being 
brought from the seed bed in baskets, the roots wrapped in bark and 
banana leaves and covered with damp coffee sacking, and then the 
laborers proceed to set out the plants. One man takes the plant and 
places it in the hole, throwing in first the earth on the right-hand side 
of the hole — that is, that portion of earth taken from the surface, 
which, being richer, is best to place next to the roots — and then the 
hole is filled with the remaining fertilized earth, tramping it down in 
the hole in order to make it firm. 

"Three or four months after the first planting it is necessary to 
replant — that is, to set out trees in those holes in which the first plant- 
ings did not live — taking care that the new trees have the same size as 
the others in order that the entire grove may develop and grow 
evenly. 

WORKINGS. 

k ' The coffee groves situated on level lands, or those but slightly in- 
clined and in situations which permit the employment of oxen, ought 
to be worked with the plow, giving it two plowings a year, the first 
after the replanting and six months later the second, selecting such 
times for this operation as will find the soil fresh and moist. 

"If, owing to the condition of the ground or on account of its incli- 
nation the plow can not be used, the coffee g'vove must be worked by 



122 REPORT ON THE CENSUS <>K PORTO RICO, 1899. 

hand, and the hoe employed for this purpose should penetrate 30 centi- 
meters into the ground; and as this work is expensive, it is done hut 
once a year, in the month of December. 

PRUNING. 

"The coffee, like all trees intended to bear fruit, requires pruning. 
If the excessive, badly calculated pruning which has been practiced in 
Cuba has been prejudicial, the abandonment of these groves to spon- 
taneous development, to which they have been left in Porto Rico and 
other points, has also worked injury. If we consider the tree as a 
machine destined to give fruit and produce forced profits, its growth 
must be regulated and its organs prepared. 

"The coffee tree should be pruned from the time it is 3 years old, 
counting from the time when the first pruning gave shape to the tree. 
This operation consists in cutting away during the third year the first 
crosses above the roots in order to commence the formation of a clean, 
strong, straight trunk. The fourth year, the fourth and even the fifth 
cross is removed for the purpose of preparing the final and only cross 
of the tree, which is to serve for the woody branches and for the for- 
mation of the top. During the fifth year the center is cut in order to 
restrain the longitudinal growth of the tree, and leave the cross at the 
height of a meter and a half, which is most convenient afterwards when 
gathering the fruit. If the tree should be allowed to grow taller the 
gathering would be difficult, and if it should have a lesser height it 
would reduce the body of the tree and diminish the productive zone. 

"In addition to the formative primings which terminate during the 
fifth or sixth year an annual pruning is necessary, which is intended: 

"First. To make the grove render the largest possible amount of 
fruit; and in order to secure this result it is necessary to cut off the 
old branches, or those which have exhausted their capacity to bear 
fruit, in order to give the tree the necessary light and ventilation. 

" Second. To suppress the suckers which absorb the sap and give no 
fruit; to cut the sprouts from the foot of the tree and also from the 
trunk and those which grow among the branches in unsuitable places; 
to suppress crooked and badly placed branches, those that may have 
been broken by storms, in the gathering of the fruit, or those which 
may have been broken by the excessive weight of the fruit. 

"The pruning is done after the harvest has been collected — that is, in 
the months of December and January — and a saw should be employed 
for the thick branches, and limbs over an inch, and a half in thickness 
should scarcely ever be cut off. For the slender branches and sprouts, 
a sharp cutting machete should be used, always making clean cuts 
close to the limb, covering the wound with some sort of grafting wax. 




1 2 



CULTIVATION OF COFFEE. 123 



HOEING. 

" Hoeing is for the purpose of freeing the ground of pernicious vege- 
tation. In Porto Rico, Cuba, and many other places this operation 
is usually performed by cutting away the growth with blows of the 
machete. 

"The hoeing in the improved cultivation is not performed in this 
manner, because by the following month, in tropical regions, the 
pernicious vegetation has again grown up, owing to the climate, tem- 
perature, and humidity. The cleaning must be done with a hoe, dig- 
ging well into the ground and causing the pernicious plants to dry up 
even to the roots. This is the way to destroy this vegetation in a few 
years and also benefit the coffee trees and enrich the ground. 

"If in the month of January the hoeing or plowing was done, of which 
mention has already been made, it will not be necessary to weed the 
ground again until the month of April, when the coffee grove is in full 
bloom. This work of weeding, in addition to destroying the weeds 
which absorb the strength of the ground, also loosens the soil which 
aids the bloom and assists in the development of the fruit. Another 
weeding, although more superficial, should be given in August in order 
that the fruit may receive the benefits which the blossoms received as 
before mentioned, and so be nourished and acquire additional weight. 

GATHERING. 

"The coffee blooms in February and March and the fruit is gathered 
in October and November. It can be readily seen how long the tree is 
engaged in reproduction, and during this time is exposed to rains 
which soak the pollen of the blossoms and render them sterile, to the 
winds which shake the fruit, to the sun which dries it up, to the birds, 
insects, and accidents which destroy the product of the grove. 

"The gathering may be performed in the following ways: 

1. By hand, gathering the berries one by one, placing them in 
baskets, sacks, etc. 

2. By shaking the tree, causing the ripe fruit to fall by a gentle 
motion, and then gathering the berries from the ground. 

3. By spontaneous falling, waiting until they by natural processes 
fall to the ground. 

"The first process is the one employed in Porto Rico, Cuba, and other 
places. It is the most reasonable, perfect, and proper, but it is neces- 
sary to have command of a sufficient working population, as it calls 
for numerous hands. Each person can or ought to gather ^fcmega 1 in 
a day. 

1 A fanega is about 100 pounds. 



124 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

COFFEE INDUSTRIES. 

"The coffee from the time it is gathered until sent to market goes 
through eight delicate processes or operations, on which depends the 
commercial value of the grain. 

"1. The most primitive method of hulling consists in putting the 
coffee into a wooden mortar and with a hard, heavy wooden pestle 
pound it long enough to loosen the hull of the coffee, green or dry, 
according to the plan adopted. 

"2. The coffee, after being hulled green, remains covered with a 
mucilage that must be removed, for which purpose the grains are 
washed in ordinary water. 

"3. After the coffee is washed it must be dried, and for this purpose 
it is spread out on the drier for the time necessary, so that the heat 
and air may thoroughly dry the grains. 

"4. From the warehouses or granaries where the coffee has been 
hulled the drier or seasoner is taken, which is a large shallow box of 
wood on stringers placed on supports. These boxes are movable, so 
they may be run out into the sunshine or returned under roof at night 
or when it rains. 

"5. When the coffee is dry it must be separated from the mem- 
branous endocarp or parchment which still covers and protects the 
grain, and this is so adherent that considerable force is necessary to 
separate it, and a good degree of skill in the work is needed in order 
to avoid breaking of the grain. 

"6. As the above-described operation leaves the coffee mixed with 
the film with which it was covered, it is necessary to clean it, and 
owing to the lightness of the film compared to the grain, wind is used 
to make the separation, and it is therefore made to fall in a shower 
from a certain height in some place where there is a good current 
of air. 

"7. Classification is the most tedious and delicate operation, and in 
Porto Rico is performed by women, who put the coffee out upon the 
ground or on a table and proceed to classify or select, forming the first 
class of the sound, large, entire, and clean grains. This is 'select' 
coffee. The second class, called triache, is composed of small, dark 
grains, having been too long in the dryer or taken from the tree before 
they were fully ripe. The third class is 'broken 1 coffee, which in- 
cludes all grains that are torn and broken during the various cleaning 
operations. 

"8. After the coffee is classified and selected it is packed in such a 
manner that it will be protected from exterior influences and causes 
that might damage or injure it. Wooden boxes, barrels, or sacks are 
used for this purpose, and are stored in the warehouses until the coffee 
is sold. 



CULTIVATION OF COFFEE. 125 

"There are small plantations where the cultivation is both intelligent 
and intense, which produce 30 quintals and more per hectare, but this 
is exceptional, for there are lands in the same region which scarcely 
produce one quintal. As an average crop, taken from the different 
classes of land, and taking into account also the variations that occur 
from year to year, a production of from 10 to 14 quintals per hectare 
may be counted on as the result of fairly intelligent cultivation." 

Report of Sefior M. Badrena. 
HISTORY. 

"It is unquestionable that the cultivation of coffee in the island of 
Porto Rico was started by emigrants from the island of Haiti, situated 
westerly of Porto Rico. The insurrection of the black element 
against the white decided most of the latter to quit the French 
side of that island and seek refuge in Porto Rico, not only on 
account of the fertility of the soil, but also because of the good nature 
of the natives. The many families of French descent which reside 
in the coffee districts confirm my opinion about this particular. 

PROGRESS. 

"Progress in cultivation was necessarily slow, as the plant requires 
ten years for full development, and markets were also to be found. 
Up to the year 1876, planters had no inducement to extend the culti- 
vation; the prices left no margin of profit, and the augmentation in 
the crops came only from natural development and some work done 
indifferently. Coffee was then considered of little consequence in the 
future of Porto Rico. Up to that time our markets were limited to 
ports of the Mediterranean Sea, Italy ranging the first. Some was 
exported also to Germany and France; very little to other markets. 
All at once the United States of America opened their markets to 
free coffee, and a jump of from $12 to $19 soon occurred; then another 
jump and the price went up to $29.30 per hundredweight, and I say 
dollars because at that time our exchange was below par. As men- 
tioned before, this happened in the year 1876, and many were the 
cargoes that left our shores for the United States, sailing ships being 
the only vessels obtainable. Unfortunately, no attention was paid to 
the quality shipped, and as we can not compete with Brazilian coffee 
on account of its relative cheapness, the field in the United States 
remained for Brazil. Later the attention of many was called to coffee 
growing; there was a good margin in it then, and more care in the 
manipulation of the bean brought to us the highest prices and the 
best markets of Europe. Spain and Cuba consumed the 'poorest 
qualities." 



126 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

HARD TIMES. 

"Not all of the planters prospered, however, during the long period 
of good prices. Excessive expenditures, unnecessary expansion in buy- 
ing new lands, money borrowed at high interest, and other causes, 
principally the changing from the gold basis to silver, which apparently, 
but only apparently, favored their interests, resulted in bad times for 
the planters, who found themselves involved in debt. 

"The war came; burning of plantations was of daily occurrence, the 
demand from Spain and Cuba was annulled, and the price was lower 
than could be remembered in a generation. Hopes, however, were 
bright for a good crop and good prices this year, but the hurricane of 
the 8th of August brought the final collapse. Much more can be said, 
but the above is sufficient in general terms to bring the attention of 
the Government to the present condition of the coffee interests. 

CULTIVATION SEEDING. 

""The old method was simple enough and consisted in breaking up 
soil and planting the berries after they were deprived of their soft 
cover or pulp. In this way a considerable quantity of small plants, as 
man} 7 as 15,000 to 16,000 per cuerda, 1 were obtained. When the plants 
were 3 years old they were removed or transplanted. Cost per cuerda, 
$15, United States currency. According to the modern method, the 
soil is prepared as above. The sprouts which grow near and around 
the old trees are carefully gathered and transplanted in holes of about 
10 to 12 centimeters, placed 1 square foot from each other. In this 
way from 5,000 to 6,000 plants are obtained in good condition every 
year from each cuerda, and the cost is $16, United States currency. 
The young plants are invariably removed to places where the shade 
and consequent moisture of large trees favor their growth. It is a 
fact that without this sort of protection the shrubs will not thrive. 
Thus every care is taken in the selection of the best shade, as the 
prospect of the future coffee-bearing tree largely depends on that. 
The coffee tree is completely developed and producing after seven years 
if the conditions under which the growth has been perfected have been 
favorable. Otherwise it will need ten years, and the product will 
never compete with that of a good sound tree. The cost of one cuerda 
of good coffee up to the date of production will average $180, United 
States currency. 

PRODUCE. 

"When the tree is four years old it will not produce sufficient to cover 
expenses, and if the soil is not of the best quality the conditions will 
be the same after five or six years. In such districts of this depart- 
ment (Mayaguez) as Las Marias and Maricoa, the produce of 1 cuerda 

*A cuerda is equal to 1.008 acres. 



CULTIVATION OF COFFEE. 127 

will range from 200 to 1,200 pounds. A fair average will give for 
every cuerda 400 pounds. The topographical conditions of the 
coffee-growing districts are such, and the hills so steep, that the only 
agricultural implement that can be used with effect is the common 
machete, or chopping knife. It is used both for cleaning the ground 
and for making the holes. 

"•During the months of March and April the trees are in full blossom. 
The flowering season covers two months; the flowers begin to show 
early in March, and in April the force of the florescence is complete. 
If March turns out to be a rainy month, most of the flowers are lost 
and the crop is a tardy one. If the rains in April are heavy and per- 
sistent, the chances are that the flowers will soon rot and fall to the 
ground and the crop be a poor one. 

GATHERING. 

"The gathering of the ripe berries is commenced late in July or early 
in August, and by the end of December all the crop is in. The beans 
are gathered one by one by hand, taking care to leave on the tree the 
green berries and to preserve the branches from injury. The result 
of a day's gathering when delivered, is passed through a cylindrical 
tube wheel, which takes away the soft part of the berry, and when 
free of this, the berries are thrown in a water tank, built of solid 
brick, in which they are left from eight to twelve hours, until fer- 
mentation sets in and the viscosity around the shelly part of the 
bean is washed away. The process is helped by moving the mass two 
times with a rake, putting in fresh water, and then taking it out. 

DRYING. 

"The process of drying by the heat of the sun will take about six 
days. The chances are, however, that more days are necessary, as the 
gathering is effected during the rainy season. In some cases twenty 
days are required. The way that the drying is effected is by spreading 
the beans on a glacis, a large square place built of brick and the 
best cement, a few inches above the ground, and where the beans 
receive the direct rays of the sun. A new device is large boxes, a 
few inches deep, which slide in and out of small wooden receptacles. 

' k There is also a system of drying by steam. It consists of a revolving 
arum through which a column of hot air is forced by steam pressure, 
the drum containing a certain quantity of beans, and the operation is 
concluded in twenty-four hours. The cost of this apparatus prevents 
the use of it by the general planters. Its name is secadora. The 
result is advantageous, both as regards quality and cheapness, the cost 
for drying a hundredweight being only a fourth that of the common 
process. 

"Once the bean is well dried it is taken to the tahona, or coffee mill, 



128 



REPORT UN THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899, 



which is made of very hard wood, in the shape of a double circle, 
within which one or two wheels run at high speed; the wheels are also 
constructed of the heaviest wood and generally covered with a sheet 
of white metal. The pressure of the wheel over the beans removes the 
shell. To every mill a coffee fan is attached, which blows off the dust 
as the stream of beans comes out of the mill. The produce is again 
placed in the mill for the last stage of the process, the polishing of 
the bean. This is obtained by friction of the beans against each other, 
and of all against the revolving wheel. 

"When the coffee is intended for shipment to the Mediterranean 
ports, then some chemical is added which imparts to the bean a beau- 
tiful bluish tint. Common blueing is mostly used for the purpose. 

SORTING. 

"Then the produce is ready for the market if a general good quality 
is required, but in some plantations the process is not completed before 
the beans are passed through a mechanical device called separadora. 
It is a large wire cylinder through which the beans run full length, 
and natural!} 7 fall, according to size, into so many departments. To 
produce what is called in the market ' picked plantation,' the picking 
is done by hand by expert women, bean by bean. Two hundred 
pounds a day is the average work of an expert trilladora; 30 cents, 
Porto Rico, are paid for every 100 pounds. 



COST AND SHIPMENT. 

"The total cost of a hundredweight of coffee ready for market, 
including expenses for cultivation, is from $10 to $12 Porto Rican 
money, equal to $6 to $7.20 United States currency. The produce is 
shipped in bags, containing each from 85 to 100 kilograms." 

On June 8, 1768, the King issued a royal cedula giving to Porto Rico 
a project for the cultivation of coffee and relieving or exempting the 
growers from the payment of any taxes or charges for a period of five 
years. In 1770 the island produced 29,121 arrobas 1 of coffee, and, 
according to the report of Governor O'Reylly, in 1776 the production 
amounted to 45,049 arrobas of coffee. Since then the production, 
according to Senor Coll y Toste, civil secretary of Porto Rico, has 
been as follows, viz: 



Year. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


1850 . 


11, 783, 684 
15, 924, 524 
17,416,762 
48, 032, 296 
43, 822, 794 
51, 710, 997 


Pesos. 

707,021.04 1 
955,471.44 | 
1,045,005.70 
3, 077, 304. 00 
5, 577, 166. 56 
12,222,599.48 


I860 


1870 . 


1880 


1890 . 


1897 





An arroba is 25 pounds English. 



CULTIVATION OF SUGAK CANE. 129 

The crop of 1898, which promised to be very large, was practically 
destroyed by the hurricane of August 8. 

The quality of the Porto Rican coffee is excellent, and the principal 
markets have been Cuba and Spain, but very little having been 
imported into the United States, where it is not well known. Under 
favorable conditions the coffee crop of Porto Rico is easily worth from 
$6,000,000 to $10,000,000. 

SUGAR. 

Report of Seflor Ricardo Hernandez. 

"The sugar cane was introduced into the island of Cuba in 1548, and 
was sown on the banks of the Toa River, where a plantation was estab- 
lished with hydraulic apparatus. The sugar cane is a perennial plant, 
whose maturity is retarded in proportion to its approximation to the 
extreme limits of its geographic area; in the tropical region it may 
reach maturity in one year, but circumstances of an economic char- 
acter in its cultivation generally retard it from 12 to 20 months; out- 
side of the Tropics, where winter is felt, cane suspends its vegetation 
temporaril} T and takes two years or more to reach maturity. 

' ; The root of the cane is fibrous, rough, crinated, and entwines the 
joint which contains the germinal point of the stem; the thickness is 
from 1 to 5 millimeters, and the length from 50 to 80 centimeters, 
the number of roots varying with the age of the plant and the character 
of the ground; they sink to a depth of from 20 to 50 centimeters. 

"Every cane stalk with a germinal point which is planted produces 
first a shoot with the roots corresponding to the joint from which the 
sprouts spring; these sprouts produce afterwards others which throw 
out roots at their respective joints in such manner that the root of the 
cane becomes a stalk or bunch composed of the collection of threads 
attached to the canes which have grown. 

"After the stalk has been dug up, and the canes have been separated 
with their respective roots, and planted separately, they grow and 
thrive in the same manner as if they had been joined to the mother 
bunch. 

" Sugar cane has such a propensity for throwing out roots that it even 
issues them at the joints around which dry leaves are wrapped. 

"The stalk is a solid cane containing a longitudinal vascular pith, or 
tissue, straight and smooth, the epidermis of which in some varieties 
is covered with a species of varnish or cereous matter called cerosin. 
The color varies from a yellowish white to a deep yellow, and from a 
wine red to violet, there being some varieties which are striped with 
violet and yellow. 

"It reaches a height of 3 to 4 meters, and a diameter of 4 centimeters 
on an average, but there are some specimens of twice this thickness, 
and also one-half of the dimensions indicated, depending principally on 
the ground in which the plant thrives. 
8490—00 9 



130 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

''The stalk is apparently divided by annular depressions, situated at a 
distance of 5 to 20 centimeters from each other according to the ground, 
which are called the joints, being formed by crossed ramifications of the 
vascular longitudinal pith which forms the interior matter of the stalk. 

"Every joint is provided with a fertile bud which has such vitality 
that its contact with damp air is sufficient for it to sprout, and after- 
wards 10, 20 to 60, or more canes grow from this single bud consti- 
tuting the stalk or bunch." 

SUITABLE CLIMATE. 

""The geographical area of the sugar cane is bounded on the north by 
a line which, starting from the center of the state of Louisiana in the 
United States toward the thirty-fifth degree of latitude, continues 
along the coast of Andalusia, thence to the coast of Greece, crossing 
southern Asia and continuing as high as Pekin, being lost finally in 
the East; and is bounded on the south by the heights of Brazil, includ- 
ing all of Africa, and continuing to Oceanica, touching the north coast 
of Australia. 

"In such a zone, which includes the most important islands of the 
planet, and the most varied climates, it may be understood that the 
sugar cane is obliged to suffer meteorological accidents and phenomena 
very distinct and varied. The most essential factor in the life of the 
cane is heat, and in proportion to the fall of the thermometer in the 
temperate zones the period of vegetation is lengthened, or, what is the 
same, maturity is retarded, it being possible to make the following 
scale: 

"In countries the average temperature of which is 15 degrees centi- 
grade in the sun, it takes the sugar cane twenty-four months to reach 
maturity; in countries where said temperature is 19 degrees in the sun, 
sixteen months; 23 degrees, fourteen months; 25 degrees, twelve 
months. 

"When the average temperature is more than 25 degrees, as is the 
case in Porto Rico, then it is possible for the cane to reach maturity 
in from nine to ten months, provided there is sufficient humidity and 
it is planted in a fertile soil. In climates having a low temperature, 
where frosts occur, especialty in the springtime, the production of 
cane is not very remunerative, as it generally freezes; such is the case 
in Spain when it is attempted to cultivate sugar cane beyond the zone 
which we indicated in mentioning- its geographical area. 

"At altitudes of more than 2,500 meters sugar cane is not produced 
well, the fall of temperature being fatal." 

SUITABLE SOIL. 

"There are two circumstances which determine the value of lands 
for sugar cane: Their situation and their composition. 



CULTIVATION OF 8UGAR CANE. 131 

" Rough lands, which are worked with difficulty and which are drained 
by evaporation and filtration with rapidity, are not good for this 
character of cultivation; and lands situated in ravines, without any 
drainage, which become flooded frequently, are also bad for cane. 

tk On the other hand, plain coast lands, cleared, which receive rains or 
irrigation and retain humidity some time without becoming swamped, 
are good for this plant; these lands not situated high above the level 
of the sea, near the coasts, which are flooded by large rivers in extra- 
ordinary freshets, but which on account of their natural location and 
great depth are quickly drained, receive the name of tierras de vega, 
and are those used for the cultivation of sugar cane everywhere. 
These lands in general are alluvial lands and are very rich in fertilizing 
elements. 

" Far from the coasts, in the interior of many countries and at altitudes 
of 2,500 meters above the level of the sea, there are valleys, plains, and 
plateaus, which also have some merits for the cultivation of sugarcane, 
such as the tierras de vega, or meadow lands, which are considered the 
best, the reason being that the lands of the tables and valleys are 
formed by transportation and carriage. 

"The physical composition of the cane lands is very variable; but 
in alluvial lands it is produced very well, because being relatively a 
surface plant it does not sink to a great depth, and therefore in other 
lands it would not secure sufficient space and material, which is only 
obtained in nutritious or very well cultivated lands." 

TIME OF SOWING. 

"In the tropical zone, where the temperature is nearly constant dur- 
ing the entire year, the seeds and stalks of the plant may be placed in 
the earth at any season, with the assurance that in a few days they will 
sprout in order to fulfill the laws of their destiny in nature. They will 
mature and die, leaving at the foot numerous ratoons. 

' ' This is the physiological life of the plants which is assisted by nature, 
giving them every year greater support for their existence, and thus 
we see the luxurious and exuberant vegetation of the plants which 
are left to themselves; but this spontaneous development of vegetation 
is modified by submitting it to rules somewhat fixed when cultivation 
is in question; when the plants are to fulfill economic functions, then 
their entire life is subjected to the satisfaction of our requirements; 
they are planted when it is convenient, and they are torn up when 
their fruit is in sufficient quantity and of the quality desired for the 
market. 

" This is one of the reasons why it is not immaterial, in tropical vege- 
tation, when the plantings are made; these being annual plants they 
must, like rice, pass through periods of heavy rains in the same way 
as tobacco has to have a dry season, and corn a happy medium, etc. 



132 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

It is clear that in regions of an irregular climate, and among cultivators 
who do not observe these laws of the plants, the success of the crops 
is questionable. 

"In so far as the planting of sugar cane is concerned, let us give it a 
full study, discussing the nature of the plant, the character of the 
climate, the practices observed in different countries, and the recip- 
rocal relations between these elements, in order to deduce the laws 
which may serve as a guide to the farmers for the purpose of fixing 
the season for planting their cane. 

" Being protected by the good climate, it appears that among the cul- 
tivators of sugar cane, in Porto Rico as in other countries, fchers is 
no fixed season for making the plantings, although in all parts there 
is a preferred period which practice has shown in each locality to be 
the best, submitting them thus by conviction to the law of relation 
between the character of the climate and the economic mission of the 
plant. 

"We state below what seasons are observed for the plantings of 
sugar cane in Porto Rico: 

"Large cultivations.— Second half of September, and all of Octo- 
ber, November, and December; first half of January. It is cut down 
in from 14 to 18 months. 

"Smaller cultivations. — Second half of January, all of February and 
March, first half of April, being cut down in from 12 to 14 months. 

"Spring. — Second half of April, May, first half of June; 12 months. 

"Late spring. — First half of June, and all of July and August, first 
half of September; from 12 to 20 months. 

" In Porto Rico the general planting is that of large cultivation, but 
some farmers, either because they have hopes of the other plantings, 
because they have lands which are worked and irrigated, or because 
they have more than time and people enough, plant also the small cul- 
tivation and spring cultivation; on the other hand the late spring 
cultivation is hardly used by anyone.'" 

REPRODUCTION OF SUGAR CANE. 

"The sugar cane is not reproduced by seeds. Its flowers are sterile, 
and whatever may be the cause, we know that all attempts made to 
secure the fecundity of the flowers have been in vain, and the experi- 
ments we have personally made for the same purpose have had the 
same negative results. 

' ' There is no way of avoiding it. We are obliged to deprive our- 
selves of the advantages we would secure if fertile seeds could be 
obtained. 

"Sugar cane not having a natural reproduction, artificial propaga- 
tion must be used in its cultivation, by means of the germinating 
points located in eveiy joint. 



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CULTIVATION OF SUGAR CANE. 133 

"The cane is cut into various stalks of 20 to 40 centimeters in 
length, having- 1, 2, 3, or more germs. All the germs contained in 
the body of the cane may also be used for propagation, although in 
cultivation those situated at the base are thrown out. Near the joint 
of each one there grows a shoot, which is an exact reproduction or 
continuation of the mother plant. All the germs have a similar virtue 
and faculty and the same power to germinate. In the cane region the 
date of the opening of the germs varies; in fact, the entire body of 
the cane does not complete its development or reach its maturity at 
the same time in the same degree, and neither have all the germs been 
able to complete their development at the same time. Sugar cane, 
when it has reached maturity — that is, when it has arrived at the time 
for cutting — may be divided into two regions of different degrees of 
maturity and saccharine richness, the stem and the cane top, the latter 
being formed by the last three or four joints of the point of the same." 

PREPARATION OF THE GROUND. 

"We will not speak of virgin lands which require clearing, nor of 
those which require drainage, or which have never been subjected to 
cultivation and require careful preparation for their cultivation, which 
special information is included in treatises on general agriculture. 

"The preparation of the lands which interest us is that of the special 
lands for sugar cane, which takes place every time a planting is made 
or the cane field is renewed. 

"As the lands devoted to sugar cane cultivation are generally plains, 
low and near the coast, etc. , and are generally moist and frequently 
flooded by the freshets of rivers, or irrigated by the rains, without the 
waters having a natural and rapid outlet, they require special drainage 
work, which constitutes the technical part of the preparation of these 
lands. 

"If the lands are high and sloping, their preparation is much simpler, 
as they do not require draining. 

" No matter what may be the land to be prepared, if it has been 
abandoned for some time to spontaneous vegetation, the first work to 
be done is to cut down to the level of the ground with the machete all 
plants and weeds in the way of the plow. These plants, which are some- 
times heavy and abundant in view of the exuberant vegetation of 
the country where sweet sugar cane grows, are gathered at several 
points on the ground, and when dry are burned, the ashes being scat- 
tered over the same. 

"After the ground has been thus cleaned, it is divided by means 
of marks and pickets into square patches, which, when permitted by 
the topography and nature of the ground, must have an area of 100 
square meters. These patches are separated from each other by means 



134 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OE PORTO RICO, 1899. 

of roads 4 meters wide, for the use of the wagons and other service 
of the plantation. 

"After the patches have been marked off, the ground is plowed over, 
where this can be done, to a depth permitted by the character of the 
ground; sometimes in very deep and loose ground, such as good 
meadow lands, a board plow is used of a large size, drawn by three yoke 
of oxen, which plows to a depth of 60 centimeters; at other times 
the ground only allows the use of a small plow which penetrates to a 
depth of 20 centimeters; a hard subsoil renders the work more 
difficult. 

"This first plowing is for the purpose of breaking the ground, and 
does not penetrate to a great depth, the hardness of the ground mak- 
ing it inadvisable. 

"After fifteen or twenty days have passed, if the weather does not 
prevent it, the ground is plowed for the second time to the same or to 
a greater depth than the first, and crossing it at right angles; and 
after another similar period, a third plowing takes place, the furrows 
being in an oblique direction to the last two, in order that the plow 
shall not pass twice through the same furrow. 

"After each plowing it is advisable to make use of an iron harrow. 

" After the land has been cleaned, marked oil', and plowed, the fur- 
rowing is begun, for which purpose, with a double plow and following 
the direction most convenient within the fields, furrows are made as 
deep as possible, parallel and at a distance of 3 meters from each 
other. If an ordinary plow is used, it will be necessary to go over 
the furrow twice in order that a pile of earth may be thrown to each 
side. 

"The purpose of these furrows is to drain the plantation. After- 
wards the laborers enter with rakes in order to prepare the banks, flat- 
tening out the ground taken from the furrows and even taking more 
from the same, thus placing the ground between the furrows higher 
and forming a bank on which planting is afterwards done in straight 
rows. % The space between two lines of canes is called a street. 

"After the furrows and banks have been made, ditches are dug for 
the drainage of the land; these are larger than the furrows, the waters 
of which they receive, and are cut following the slope of the land. 

"In general, this is sufficient; but there are cases where it is advis- 
able to make larger furrows, the final receivers of the water from the 
furrows, and from the ditches. 

"It will be understood that after the land has been prepared, and in 
marking it off into lots, the direction of the furrows, ditches, etc., 
must be very carefully considered. 

"On high land, hilly, sloping, dry land, and on land where excessive 
moisture is not to be had, the work is simplified, the preparation being 
reduced to the clearing and plowing necessary, which do not require 










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CULTIVATION OF SUGAK CANE. 135 

the special and difficult work of drainage. When land subject to irri- 
gation is in question, the preparation is the ordinary and current one 
for all kinds of plantations. The topography of the land will show 
the system to be adopted, and the canals and irrigating ditches which 
go around the high portions of the land, by means of locks or other 
means, give the water to the cane, the planting- of which may take 
up different forms. 

" Sometimes it becomes necessary to harmonize the drainage and 
irrigation of the plantation, which is very easily done by means of fur- 
rows, which conduct the water during the irrigation to the other furrows 
and ditches or banks. 

" The vegetation of sweet cane is so exuberant that it is sufficient to 
throw upon the ground a stalk containing knots having sufficient eyes 
or buds, for it to grow and produce as good a cane as the richness of the 
ground will permit. It will be understood that there is an infinite 
variety of ways of planting the cane, from simply throwing it upon the 
ground or adopting the latest methods suggested by science. 

" We show below the most ordinary and usual manner of planting the 
sugar cane in Porto Rico. 

" Spade planting . — Is adopted when the land is hard to work, or wnen 
it is sandy or compact, or when the soil is very deep, and when replant- 
ings are made, and on dry, cleared land. 

11 ' Holes or pits. — On ground having a deep soil, no irrigation, where 
the planting is to last several years, and where there are sufficient 
laborers. 

"On banks. — On land having a shallow soil, with much moisture, 
no drainage; on plantations on a small scale, and where a sufficient 
number of workmen can be procured. 

" I will state here what each kind of planting of sugar cane consists 
of. 

SPADE PLANTING. 

" This planting requires a small removal of earth and consists in dig- 
ging rectangular holes of more or less depth, according to the moisture 
and thickness of the vegetable coat. 

" The holes are dug in straight lines and at equal distances from each 
other; in each hole two, three, or even four stalks are placed, which 
are laid at the bottom of the hole, or against one of the sides thereof, 
in an almost vertical position for the purpose of throwing off the 
humidity and for protection against the ravages of insects. The 
stalks are covered with a coat of earth of 1 inch thickness." 

PLANTING IN HOLES OR PITS. 

"After tUe ground has been cleared and prepared with the furrows 
and ditches necessary, the places for the holes are indicated by means 
of pegs, and the laborers, with spades, each take one line, digging holes 



136 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

-which are generally square and of a depth varying between 15 and 30 
centimeters, the greater depth being given to dry land or to land swept 
by winds. The workmen in digging the holes place the earth dug up 
at their feet near the edge of the hole, thus making small hills of from 
35 to 40 centimeters in height. Sometimes this earth is thrown off to 
the right of the holes, making a continuous hill in the center of the 
street remaining between the holes. These hills receive the name of 
banks, which are very different, however, from those made between 
furrows and on which planting is done. 

"In each hole between two and four cuttings are placed. The latter 
number in general is too high and is only used when, on account of the 
bad character of the cane which can be procured and the poverty of 
the ground, the ravages of insects are feared, or other causes which 
might destroy the shoots, by which the expense of replanting is avoided. 

"The cane stalks placed in the holes may be placed in different posi- 
tions; they may be laid down on the bottom or on the sides of the 
holes. In the first case they may be placed parallel to each other and 
at equal distances, or some parallel and others crossing the same, or 
leaning against the corners of the hole and allowing them to meet in 
the center of the bottom, or crossing the corners and leaving an open 
space in the bottom, etc. In the second case all the stalks are placed 
against the same side, or half on one side and half on the other, or, 
finally, one on each side. 

"Before placing the stalks in the hole, it is customary to throw some 
loose earth at the bottom to serve as a bed. After the stalks have been 
placed in position, they are covered with earth, taken from the hills 
adjacent thereto, but not more than 1 inch in thickness. 

"This is the general character of the planting done in Porto Rico, 
where the land is prepared in an excellent manner; but as it is never 
fertilized nor irrigated, the returns are very meager." 

PLANTING ON BANKS. 

"This kind of planting is convenient or advisable in the cases we have 
mentioned in the classification above, and consists in laying off the 
ground and raising banks over the ordinary level of the ground, 
taking ground from the furrows which are to separate the same. The 
planting is made on these banks, according to the rules mentioned, in 
such manner that each bank does not contain more than two lines of 
canes. 

"The manner of preparing the land is the same as we have mentioned 
in speaking of the preparation thereof, and is adopted in many plan- 
tations on a small scale, as when the cane is to be sold in towns for 
chewing or for the purpose of making beverages. 

"Afterwards the cane requires the following care: 




•B / JB 




CULTIVATION OF SUGAE CANE. 137 

REPLANTING. 

' ' Not all the stalks having germs which are placed in the ground give 
good results, sometimes on account of a mistake in the character of the 
planting adopted, or on account of the bad condition of the shoots, or 
of lack of humidity in the ground, which paralyzes the progress of the 
growth, or sometimes on account of an excessive degree of moisture 
which causes the roots to rot, and finally by reason of other accidents, 
such as the ravages of animals, insects, etc., to such an extent that 
there often remain in the plantation empty spaces without any cane 
whatsoever. 

"Whatever be the number of stalks or shoots lost, replanting is 
necessary; to what extent may be seen after the planting begins to 
spring up. 

"The stalks used in the replanting are to be of proper condition and 
have the germs perfectly developed, in order that they may soon 
germinate and reach the height of the preceding cane. Should there 
be a great difference between the development of one and the other, 
wh6n the cutting period arrives, the cane will have a different state of 
maturity, reducing the degree of sugar. 

"For replanting, the spade system is generally used. Sometimes, 
but not very often, new holes have to be dug and the disposition of 
the ground changed, which will give rise to new expenses." 

WEEDING. 

"This operation consists in tearing out of the ground the weeds 
which grow in the plantation. 

"In cane countries spontaneous vegetation is excessive to such an 
extent that it constitutes the principal enemy of all cultivation, and if 
it is not frequently and tenaciously combatted, no cultivation of any 
kind would be possible in these countries. 

' ' Generally one month after the cane has sprung up the first weeding 
must be done, which is done with a hoe or spade, tearing up by the 
roots the weeds which exist between the lines or in the streets, and 
with the hands those growing between the cane. The first weeding is 
sometimes confined to this only, when there is not a sufficient personnel, 
or when other work is to be done on the plantation. 

"The weeds torn up by their roots are gathered together, and after 
the earth has been shaken from them they are placed on the hills of 
earth for the purpose of rotting and fertilizing the ground, or to serve 
as a bed for the cane when it develops and falls. 

"The weeding must be repeated at frequent intervals until the cane, 
when about five or six months old, has grown to a sufficient height to 
cross and for its foliage to cast a shadow on the ground, after which 
hardly any weeds grow and injure the cane. 



138 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

"The number of weedings during this period must not be les.s than 
two or more than live, depending on the fecundity of the ground, the 
character of the climate, the previous condition of the land, the pre- 
paratory labors, and even the kind of fertilizer used. 

"Thus the rules for weeding are reduced to the following: 

'"1. To extirpate the roots of weeds with a hoe or by hand, taking- 
care not to injure the roots of the cane. 

"2. To deposit the weeds uprooted on the edges, hills, or banks, where 
they are not in the way and where they can serve as a bed for the cane. 

"3. To repeat the operation whenever there is an abundance of weeds 
covering the soil, or which injure the plantings." 

HILLING. 

"This is the operation of covering the foot of the plants with earth. 

"The sugar cane, the same as corn, tobacco, and many other plants of 
active vegetation, has the facult}^ of throwing out visible roots at the 
level of the ground. They appear to rise from the ground, and if they 
were not protected by cultivation theiv economical rendition would 
suffer to a high degree. 

"According to the class and form of planting adopted, the hilling is 
done before or after the same. In plantings with buds in the air the 
hilling must be done within thirty days after the shoots have sprung 
up; in deeper plantings it is done at a later period. 

"This operation is done from one to three times, according to circum- 
stances, because if the lack of earth at the foot of the cane is great, an 
excess thereof is injurious. Its object is to give a greater basis to the 
plant from which to derive nutrition; it favors the development of the 
shoots and prepares the bunch for the subsequent crops. 

"This explains the necessity of hilling, which should not be very great, 
as several coats of earth would prevent the germs of the shoots at a 
certain depth from germinating on account of a lack of air or of energy 
to surmount the obstacle, thus endangering the subsequent crops. 

"Therefore a little hilling is necessary and sufficient; too much is 
expensive and injurious for the future life of the cane field." 

BREAKING OFF SUCKERS OR SHOOTS. 

"Cane planted under normal conditions is all the time producing 
shoots, and if this were permitted it is understood that when the cut- 
ting period arrives there would be cane of all kinds in the plantation, 
some ripe and others half ripe, and it would require a considerable 
expense to separate it. If not separated they would go together to the 
mill, and while the ripe cane would give a sirup heavily charged with 
sugar, the green cane would give it charged with glucose, thus giving 
together a sirup having a reduced amount of sugar, requiring more com- 
bustion to secure evaporation, and rendering less sugar. 




SUGAR MILL IN MANATI. 



CULTIVATION OF SUGAR CANE. 139 

' ' Therefore, when the third or fourth weeding takes place, the shoots 
which have not reached the proper stage are torn out, especially those 
which it is known will not reach a mature state at the time for cutting, 
and which if left would deprive the principal plants of nutritious 
elements. This operation is done by hand, and a slight effort upward 
is sufficient to remove them. 11 

STRIPPING OFF LEAVES. 

"As the sugar cane grows and approaches maturity, its internodes 
develop in proportion, reaching such a stage that they shed the pro- 
tecting leaves that envelop them. 

"The spontaneous shedding of leaves begins on the lowest internode, 
and continues ascending, in proportion as the plant reaches maturity, 
until the foliage is reduced to the cane top, which is also shed after 
blooming, when the plant dies, first in the economical order and then 
in the physiological. 

"In stripping the leaves it may easity be ascertained when the opera- 
tion is to take place. A leaf which is still green does not detach itself 
easily and must not be touched until it is dry. 

"The first stripping takes place after four months, and from this time 
until the cutting the operation must be repeated two or three times. 

k ' The stripping must not be made during very warm weather and 
intense sun, because it somewhat dries the tender portions of the plants. 

""The stripping, besides avoiding the injuries which we have men- 
tioned and increasing the degree of sweetness of the juice of the cane, 
has also the object of retarding the blooming.' 1 

CUTTING THE CANE. ' 

' ' The sugar cane has a critical moment of maturity which it is neces- 
sary to take advantage of for cutting. Maturity is reached when the 
cane blooms, or ceases to grow and develop. At this period the cane 
contains the largest amount possible of sugar. 

"The cane, before reaching maturity, in its green condition, has not 
had time fulty to elaborate its juices — that is to say, to transform the 
glucose into sucrose — and the cutting, therefore, at this stage would 
be disastrous, because as much sugar would be lost as there is glucose 
in the cane, and furthermore rendering the operation of elaborating 
much more difficult. 

""On the other hand, if maturity is reached — a long period of time 
should be allowed to elapse — other evils would originate. Rains on ripe 
cane make it green again, as is the case with indigo and other indus- 
trial plants. The juice of the cane is reduced; the saccharine matter 
turns into glucose. In addition, the ripe cane has fulfilled its mission, 
and from this moment it begins to die. It leans over until it touches 
the ground, roots sprouting from the internodes which touch the 



140 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



ground, and the respective germs develop shoots, all of them develop- 
ing at the expense of the juice of the cane— that is, from the saccharine, 
which diminishes and becomes transformed into glucose until it is 
exhausted. On the other hand, old cane becomes hard, increasing the 
cost of the cutting and rendering the operation of grinding much more 
difficult. From all this it may be seen that green cane, as well as over- 
ripe cane, can not well be used for industrial purposes. 

"The age of the cane and the condition of the weather determine the 
time for cutting; when these two factors do not concur with each 
other, the right moment has not arrived. 

"Cane ready for cutting changes color and becomes lighter; the 
leaves, excepting those of the cane top, are dry, the stalk becomes 
brilliant or shiny. The characteristic signs of the cane ready for 
cutting when once seen can never be mistaken. 

"I state below, according to the analysis made by M. Deitell at the 
agricultural station on Reunion Island, the composition of cane at the 
different stages of maturity: 



Age of cane in months. 


Per cent 

of crys- 

tallizable 

sugar. 


Per cent 
of not 
crystal- 
lizable 
sugar. 


10 . 


11.21 
12.44 
15.15 
16.35 
20.65 
21.03 


3.01 
2.55 
1.05 
0.36 
0.23 
0.07 


13 


15 


16 


17 . . 


22 





The following statement of cost of planting and caring for 1 euerda 
of sugar cane from date of planting to time of cutting was prepared 
by Senor Badrena, supervisor of the department of Mayaguez: 

"When the soil is sandy and loose it will need — 

Plowing three times, cost $7. 50 

Ditching 6. 00 

Holes for planting the shoots, 2,500 to every euerda 5. 00 

Cost of shoots, 7, 500 to every euerda 9. 37 

Planting the same 3. 12 

Cleaning the ground from weeds four times during the growth 8. 00 

Clearing the plant from dry leaves 2. 00 

Total cost of 1 euerda : 

Porto Rican currency $40. 99 

United States currency 24. 59 

"When the soil is hard it will need — 

Plowing four times, cost $12. 00 

Making the ditches 8. 75 

Making the holes 7. 50 

Planting the shoots 13. 12 



CULTIVATION OF TOBACCO. 



141 



" When the soil is hard it will need — 

Cleaning the ground from weeds $10. 00 

Clearing the plant from dry leaves 2. 00 

Total cost of 1 cuerda: 

Porto Rican currency 53. 37 

United States currency 31. 02 

Cutting 1 cuerda of cane costs $4=$2.40 United States currency. 

Average cost of manufacturing 1 hogshead of sugar, 10 pesos ; equal to $6 United 
States currency. 

Net weight of 1 hogshead of sugar in shipping condition is 1 , 200 pounds. 

Tare that is usually deducted from gross weight of cask, 12 per cent. 

Loss of weight during transportation to ports of the United States by steamships, 
6 per cent; by sail, 10 to 12 per cent. 

Cost of putting 1 hogshead on board ship, 25 cents, Porto Rico. 

Bonofication, usually paid to planters for lightei*age from the plantation to market, 
$1, or $0. 60 United States currency, per cask." 

According to Fray Inigo Abbad and Col. George D. Flinter, of the 
general staff of the Spanish army, and for many years a resident of 
Porto Rico, the production of sugar in 1775 was 273,750 pounds; in 
1803, 176,341 pounds; in 1810, 2,544,923 pounds; in 1828, 12,251,662 
pounds, and in 1830, 31,514,388 pounds. According to Senor Coll y 
Toste, the production for and since 1850 was as follows, viz: 



Year. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


1850 


Pounds. 
112, 129, 432 
116, 015, 181 
191, 649, 670 
221,220,894 
128, 021, 904 
126, 827, 472 
1 132, 000, 000 


Pesos. 
3,910,167.38 
3, 480, 455. 33 
5, 749, 492. 10 
3, 016, 948. 55 
3, 782, 465. 50 
4, 007, 992. 08 


1860 


1870 


1880 


1890 


1897 


1899 







1 Estimated 



As in Cuba, the tendency is toward large plantations, with central 
mills for grinding. Comparatively few of the sugar estates are pro- 
vided with steam vacuum machinery for making sugar, and nearly 
one-half of the cane-grinding machines are worked by oxen. The 
hurricane of August 8, 1899, damaged the sugar mills considerably, 
and the financial straits of the planters have made it impossible to 
restore the plants. Larger plantations or colonias, improved methods 
of cultivation, and central mills with improved machinery will in time 
no doubt add enormously to the output of sugar. 



TOBACCO. 

Report by Senor Planella. 

"It may be said that the cultivation of tobacco prior to the year 1870 
was limited in some parts of this island to small plantings for domestic 
consumption in cigarettes, cigars, and fine cut tobacco. 



142 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

' ' In the year above mentioned exportation to Cuba commenced and 
tobacco growing- received a great stimulus and development. 

''The increase of tobacco factories, which demanded a constant supply 
of leaf tobacco, suitable for being worked into cigars, had a tendency 
to increase the cultivation in those localities which were adapted to 
produce the most select product for the manufacturer. 

"The establishment of new factories has made the Porto Rican prod- 
uct known in the various markets of Europe and America. The demand 
and consumption stimulate the manufacturer to a regular production 
in those factories which employ the select stock raised in good localities. 

" It must be confessed, however, that up to the present time the cul- 
tivation of tobacco has not kept pace with the demand of the manufac- 
turer, who is obliged by the demands of his buyers to seek first-class 
stock which has the quality, flavor, style, and workmanship desired by 
the consumer. The cultivation of tobacco has responded to none of 
these demands, because the quality of the tobacco depends more on the 
land than the cultivation, which has not produced a marked improve- 
ment in the product. 

""A careful selection of seed has not been made, and to this fact is due 
the varieties of tobacco cultivated. The grower has given his atten- 
tion to the raising of plants that produce beautiful leaves that will 
look well in the market and that have good weight, the only qualities 
he looks for in order to obtain remuneration for his labor. At the 
present time, however, the manufacturer requires of the tobacco 
grower a product that will satisfy the demands of manufacture and 
also the demand for the product. This advancement in the industry 
calls for an advance in the cultivation which constitutes a specialty, 
and has produced among tobacco cultivators a real revolution, destroy- 
ing known methods in order to establish others which will produce 
qualities called for both by taste and manufacturing. It is not suffi- 
cient any more that the tobacco should have a good flavor and burn 
well. It must also have a light, clear color, a tine aroma, be elastic 
both in the leaf and intercostal spaces, which must also present a large 
surface. 

"The grower must have as a principal factor special land, rich in 
salts of potash, on which to grow the plant under the proper condi- 
tions, in order that the tobacco may acquire the aroma, a certain 
special flavor, richness of nicotine, which should not exceed 2 per 
cent, and good burning qualities; all these being essentials looked for 
by the manufacturer and demanded by the consumer. This is the 
reason wl^ the regions recognized as producers of good tobacco 
are so appreciated. Cayey, for the quality of tobacco produced, is in 
Porto Rico, what Vuelta Ahajo is in Cuba. 

"Several varieties of the nicotian plant are cultivated in the 
country — that called Guacha/ro, which is believed to be a native of 



CULTIVATION OF TOBACCO. 143 

Venezuela, the Virginia h/anca, the Corazon de Yarn, the Cubano, 
and others. As yet the selection of the variety best suited for the pur- 
poses of the manufacturer has not been made. He prefers a leaf with 
color, elasticity, large intercostal spaces, and small ribs, which are the 
best for the manufacture of the different kinds of cigars which the 
consumer demands — essential qualities which oblige the maker to seek 
the locality productive of good tobacco, indeed the only selection that 
is now made. 

" The cultivation of tobacco presents three principal phases: First, 
the seed; second, the general cultivation in all its details; third, the 
cutting and curing of the leaf. 

"In order to obtain good seed, as a general rule forest land or that 
next to rivers is selected. When the land is properly prepared, the 
seed is irrigated from the 30th of August until the end of September, 
special attention being given to germination until the plant is suffi- 
ciently developed to be transplanted to the field- where it is to be 
cultivated. 

" Some months before the seed is sown the land is prepared, the plow- 
ing being done in the months of June and July. If the ground is full 
of weeds, they are turned under, so that as they decay they may serve 
as a fertilizer. In August the ground is plowed again, and as a final 
preparation it is harrowed so as to be kept loose. The months of 
October, November, December, and January are the months in which 
tobacco is sown, October being the month in which it is most likely to 
secure good results, because the plants grow during the season of light 
showers. The hard rains of April injure many leaves. 

"Tobacco fields require careful cultivation and constant attention in 
order to overcome the many insects that attack the plant. The culti- 
vator must persecute them morning, noon, and night. 

"The tobacco grower, as the plant develops, separates the leaf from 
the plant, which should not be done until said plant is three months old. 
The leaves are cut off with the proper instrument in handfuls, which 
the laborer places on his arm, in order to deposit them with much 
care on wooden frames, and carries them to the curing house, where 
they are placed with the proper spaces between them. 

"From 16,000 to 20,000 plants should be set out on each cuerda 
of land. 

"The leaves are cured in houses covered in such a manner that the 
air does not penetrate, and never the rays of the sun nor the rains. 

' ' When the leaf is cured it is taken from the curing house, and after 
cutting off a small piece of the stem attached it is put through the first 
'sweat,' or, rather, a slight fermentation. 

"When the tobacco is sorted the leaves are united in bunches of 15 
or 20, tied together at the base, and this bunch is known as a manilla. 
These mcmillas are then arranged according to classes, forming large 



144 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

piles, so that they undergo the second fermentation, which should be 
watched and brought to an end at the proper time. Finalty the 
manillas are packed in yaguas (palm bark), being in this form ready to 
be stored in the warehouses. 

"The tobacco leaves undergo three fermentations or sweatings in 
the months of April, June, and August. 

' ' There is much tobacco which, after undergoing the three f ermen - 
tations, loses its strength and becomes in this manner of poor quality 
for the manufacture of cigars. In Latin America this is called tvhano. 

"The manufacturer, jealous for the reputation of his factory, always 
keeps this fact in mind, and therefore it is necessary to have a good 
knowledge of the place of production and the importance which a good 
producing zone acquires. 

"The tobacco produced on the coast, in forests, and other places, not 
suited to be made into cigars, is employed in the manufacture of fine 
cut chewing tobacco. This is prepared in the following manner: A 
given number of leaves are twisted together, and to this twist is added 
another equal to the former, and this process is continued until a cord 
or rope some 80 yards long is produced, which is then rolled like 
thread on a spool, forming a roll a yard in diameter, covered with 
banana leaves. 

"In order to cut or thread the tobacco, it is moistened with salt water 
or an infusion of coffee, for the purpose of developing a sufficient 
quantity of nicotine and acquiring greater strength when it ferments. 
Many of these rolls are lost after the last sweat, which is in August, 
owing to the poor quality of the tobacco, which fact the merchant 
keeps in mind and buj^s with the proviso that he will pay 10 or more 
dollars a roll, if in August it should not spoil. After this date the roll 
is safe and the tobacco improves with age. 

"In conclusion, this plant, which gives no element of life to the 
human organism, is one of those most desired by mankind, and develops 
an industrial-agricultural movement of such importance that it gives 
employment to thousands of persons, forming an industry which rep- 
resents millions of dollars, in which skill and good taste unite in order 
that the cigar smoker may reduce their products to smoke and ashes, 
delighting his senses in a grateful and aromatic combustion." 

In remarking on the origin and production of tobacco in Porto Rico 
Senor Coll y Toste writes: 

"Our tobacco is an indigenous plant. The Government originally 
was opposed to smoking, and there exist two Papal bulls excommuni- 
cating any one using it. There exists also a royal cedula of 1608, 
prohibiting the cultivation of tobacco in Porto Rico. In 1634 planting 
was resumed. According to statistics in 1770, the production of 
tobacco amounted to 83,651 arrobas, and, according to the report of 
Governor O'Reylly, in 1776 the production amounted only to 28,070 




GATHERING COCOANUTS. 



CULTIVATION OF TOBACCO. 



145 



arrobas. The planting of tobacco, which began to receive an impetus 
to such an extent that in 1836 it was exported from the island, after- 
wards diminished so that importation in large amounts became neces- 
sary to meet the local demand." 



Production. 



Year. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


1850 


Pounds. 
2, 973, 308 
2, 557, 448 
5, 950, 322 
12, 188, 517 
3, 977, 987 
6, 255, 953 


Pesos. 
118, 932. 32 

95,010.77 

238, 012. 88 

831,035.45 

589, 465. 37 

1,194,318.30 


1860 


1870 


1880 


1890 


1897 





In this connection, Gen. G. W. Davis, Military Governor of Porto 
Rico, reports: 

"The year 1897 is the last for which statistics have been published. It is noticed 
as relevant that the records show that the value has remained about the same — i. e., 
from 19 to 21 centavos per pound, since 1892. 

"As respects the quality or grade of tobacco there are several kinds, as in many other 
countries. The cheapest is known locally as baliche, which is only marketed in 
Europe, and is worth from 4 to 4 J centavos per pound. The portion so graded is not 
more than one-fourth or one-third of the total crop. Of the remainder, about 
1,000,000 pounds, more or less, is manufactured into cigars and cigarettes, and is con- 
sumed locally. The more valuable grades are known to the trade as ' filler and 
wrapper,' and the aggregate of this grade of a normal crop would reach quite 4,000,000 
pounds. In 1897 all this grade of tobacco went to Cuba, and brought, on an aver- 
age, from 15 to 20 centavos per pound. But the prohibitive duty of $5 per pound on 
tobacco imported into that island has sealed the door to further business, and as there 
is no market for it in Europe, and taxes in the United States are all the way from 35 
cents to $1.85, it results that there is no foreign market at all for the better grades. 

" When the Cuban tax went into effect last January the fact was at once known, 
and last spring not more than one-third of a normal crop was planted. Hence there 
is a comparatively small quantity now in store. This is the surplus of the last two 
crops, and may reach 1,500,000 pounds, but there are few buyers. Unless the United 
States or Cuban market is open to Porto Rico, this stock must remain stored until 
finally worked up here, and future planting must be diminished until supply and 
local demand adjust themselves. This means the cutting off of a source of revenue 
that has in the past brought to Porto Rico an annual income of from 500,000 to 
1,250,000 pesos. 

" Were the United States tax abated outright, the production would rapidly increase, 
and might in two or three years be expected to reach a total of $5,000,000, for with 
improved methods of culture and preparation for market it will bring much better 
prices." 

8490—00 10 



146 



EEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



STOCK RAISING. 

Classed with agricultural industries is stock raising, an important 
and remunerative industry. Horses, mules, donkeys, cattle, sheep, 
goats, and hogs are raised, the number in 1897 being shown in the 
following table, prepared in the office of the civil secretary, viz: 



Cattle of all kinds. 


Number of 
head. 


Price 
per head. 


Total price. 




67, 751 
4,467 
717 
303, 612 
2,055 
5, 779 


Pesos. 
30 
30 
30 
20 
5 
4 


Pesos. 

2, 032, 530 

134,010 

21,510 

6,072,240 

10, 275 

23, 116 

67, 055 














13,411 


Total ... 










8, 360, 736 









The following, from the same source, gives the total number of 
farms, plantations, etc., together with their area, for the year 1897. 
The agricultural tables will show their present number and area when 
the census was taken: 





60, 953 






61,556 
122, 358 
4,227 
93, 508 
17, 176 
1,127,086 
664, 270 


Coffee 


do.... 




do.... 




do.... 




do.... 




do.... 


Woodland and swamps and barren 

Total 


do.... 

do__ 


2, 090, 181 





ROADS, RAILROADS, AND AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

Among the great drawbacks to agriculture are the lack of roads and 
railroads and the inferior agricultural implements in use. With the 
exception of the military road between San Juan and Ponce, a branch 
from Cayey to Guayama, the road from Aguadilla to San Sebastian 
and from the port of Ponce to Adjimtas, there is not a good road in 
the island. 1 Even those in the immediate vicinity of the cities are in 
poor condition, and during the rainy season all of them, with the 
exceptions noted, are almost impassable for vehicles. The total length 
of all railroads is about 159 miles, all tracks being narrow-gauge, and 
the rolling stock, roadbeds, etc., very inferior. Facing this page a 
photograph of a collection of the agricultural implements in ordi- 
nary use may be seen. They are of the most primitive kind, and will, 
no doubt, soon be replaced by something better. 

Among other causes which have greatly retarded the agricultural 

1 General Daris is giving this subject special attention, and has expended upward 
of $1,000,000 in the repair and construction of roads. 



THE AGRICULTURAL SCHEDULE. 



147 



development of Porto Rico, the hurricane must be given a prominent, 
and, it is feared, a permanent place. Between 1515 and 1899, eighteen 
hurricanes, more or less disastrous in their effects, have swept over 
the island. Against this peril the planter, the farmer, the stock 
raiser, and the rural poor have no possible protection. The last one, 
which visited the island August 8, 1899, was especially disastrous, the 
estimated loss, present and prospective, to the coffee industry alone 
being 25,000,000 pesos,. A large number of people lost their lives, 
and 250,000 were thrown on the charity of the Government. For an 
account of this hurricane and, in fact, of the condition of the island 
in general, the reader is referred to the voluminous report of General 
Davis, to which reference has already been made. 

DISCUSSION OF THE AGRICULTURAL TABLES. 

[See Tables XXXVIII-XLIL] 

The following is a translation of the schedule used by the enumer- 
ators in gathering the agricultural data: 

Schedule No. 3. — Agricultural Statistics. 



District of enumeration No. 
, 1899. 



Enumerator. 



Supervisor's district No. . 

Compiled by me on the day of 

1. Name of farmer or owner. 

2. Residence. 

3. Color or race. 

Note. — State whether white, negro, mixed, Chinese. 

4. Porto Rican or Spaniard. 

Note. — State whether Porto Rican, Spaniard, or citizenship in suspense, according 
to whether he has taken the oath; if this question relates to a foreigner and is therefore 
superfluous, write foreigner. 

5. Does the farm or plantation belong to the person named or is it leased? 

6. Area of the farm or plantation in caballerias and cordeles. 

Area under cultivation at the present time. 
Area uncultivated at the present time. 

7. Approximate area under cultivation prior to 1895. 

8. Wooded area. Character of woods, high or low. 

9. Distribution of area under cultivation, according to crops: 



Crops. 


Area in cabal- 
lerias. 


Crops. 


Area in cabal- 
lerias. 


Tobacco 








Sugar cane 








Rice 
















Potatoes 








Yams 




Wax.. 


Bananas 








Cocoanut trees 








Coffee 








Onions 

























Note. — Indicate on blank lines any other crops. 



148 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

10. Number of cattle on the hoof on the day of enumeration: 



Kind. 


Number. 


Value, 


in ])esos. 


Kind. 


Number. 


Value, in pesos. 




















Bulls 












Heifers 










































Poultry 

















































Note. — Indicate on blank lines any other cattle on the hoof. 

1 1 . Number of grinders and evaporators on the plantation on this day : 

Mills, number. Output, in arrobas, of cane per day. 
Evaporating apparatus, number. Production, in sacks, per day. 

12. Number and capacity of the stills on the plantation: 

Number. Capacity, in gallons, per day. 

Agriculture is the principal — indeed, almost the sole — occupation of 
the people of Porto Rico. This fact, which is so plainly shown in the 
tables of occupations, is further emphasized by the small proportion 
of urban population. The industries of trade, transportation, and 
manufactures are of almost trifling importance. In the census no 
attempt was made to obtain statistics of other branches of industry 
than agriculture, and the inquiries concerning that industry were pur- 
posely made as simple as possible, in the belief that it was better worth 
while to obtain, in fairly complete form, a few leading facts than to 
attempt with a probability of failure an exhaustive inquiry into the 
details of this industry. The inquiries were limited to those relating 
to areas of farms; to cultivated land and woodland; to the tenure of 
farms, with the race of the occupant; to the area cultivated in certain 
leading crops; to a few details regarding the production of sugar and 
coffee, and to the number and character of live stock. The questions 
were identical with those asked in Cuba. The results of the inquiries 
were in most respects more satisfactory than in the larger island, 
owing to a variety of conditions. The island had been in a state of 
profound peace under settled conditions. Owing to its comparatively 
dense population, land values were higher, and, consequently, the limits 
and areas of farms were better known. For the same reason there 
was little or no uncertainty as to the character of the tenure. There 
were practically no squatters in Porto Rico. 

Table XXXVIII presents for Porto Rico, for each of its seven depart- 
ments and for each municipal district, the number of farms, the area 
included within them, the cultivated area, and the area covered with 
timber. Throughout this and subsequent tables, and in great part in 
this discussion, the measure of area which will be used is the Porto 
Rican cuerda, which may be accepted as the equivalent of an acre. 
Of the total area of Porto Rico — 3,606 square miles — 2,743 square miles 
were included within farms. This is 76 per cent, or more than three- 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1889. 




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AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 



149 



fourths of the area of the island. The area under cultivation was 747 
square miles, or not less than 21 per cent of the entire area of the 
island. These figures are in strong contrast with those for Cuba, of 
which 29.9 per cent only were included within farms, and only 3 per 
cent of the area of the island was under cultivation. They approach 
more nearly the condition of things in the United States, where in 
1890, 16 per cent was under cultivation. Yet, considering the density 
of the rural population, which is far beyond that of any part of the 
United States, the proportion of cultivated land is small. To illus- 
trate this, consider the case of Illinois, in which the number of rural 
inhabitants to a square mile was in 1890 but 42, or less than one-fifth 
as great as in Porto Rico, while more than seven-tenths of its area 
was under cultivation. 

The total number of farms in Porto Rico was 39,021; the total area 
was 1,757,774 cuerdas; the average farm had an area of but 45 cuerdas, 
or acres; the cultivated land comprised 477,987 cuerdas, an average to 
a farm of only 12 cuerdas. In the United States in 1890 the average 
farm contained 137 acres, of which 78 acres were improved. In Cuba 
the average farm had an area of 142 acres, of which, however, only 
about 13 acres were under cultivation. 

The following table gives for each of the seven departments of the 
island the total area, the cultivated area, the proportion cultivated, 
the average size of the farm, and the average number of cuerdas 
under cultivation: 

PORTO RICO. 



Department. 


Total 
area. 


Cultivated 
area. 


Proportion 
cultivated. 


Average 
size of farm. 


Average 

amount 

cultivated. 




Sq. miles. 
240 
621 
542 
561 
329 
395 
821 


Sq. miles. 
83 
158 
68- 
78 
49 
123 
183 


Per cent. 
35 
25 
13 
14 
15 
31 
22 


Cuerdas. 
28 
50 
45 
57 
33 
36 
53 


Cuerdas. 

9 
15 

8 

13 
10 
13 
17 






Guayama 


Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Total 


3,606 


747 


21 


45 


12 





From the above table it appears that there was considerable range 
among the different departments in the proportional area under culti- 
vation, this being least in Bayamon and largest in Aguadilla, the 
western departments having the largest proportion of land under 
cultivation. 

The average size of farms ranged from 28 cuerdas in Aguadilla to 
57 in Guayama, the departments having the largest proportional area 
under cultivation having, as a rule, the smallest farms. 

The distribution of cultivated land is shown upon the map opposite 
this page. The municipal district has been used as the unit of com- 
putation and coloring. The map shows that the western part of the 



150 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



island was in a much higher state of cultivation than the eastern part, the 
largest proportion being found at the west end and in the interior 
of the western half, while the north and south coast strips were less 
highly cultivated. 

FARM TENURE BY RACE. 

Table XXXIX shows for Porto Rico and the several departments 
the number of farms, classified by the race of their occupants and the 
character of the holdings, whether owned or rented, while the fifth 
column comprises all classes of mixed occupancy. Each of the above 
groups is furthermore classified by the size of the cultivated areas of 
the farms. 

Table XL gives the cultivated areas of farms, classified in a similar 
manner. 

From the first of these tables, which classifies the number of farms 
by tenure and race, it appears that 71 per cent of all farms were 
owned by whites and 22 per cent were owned by colored, making 
a total of 93 per cent of the farms of Porto Rico owned by their 
occupants. Five per cent were rented by whites and 1 per cent by 
colored, the remainder being mixed tenure. This proportion of 
owned farms is unusually large. In the United States in 1890 only 72 
per cent of the farms were owned, and in but few states was the pro- 
portion of owned farms as large as in Porto Rico. The proportion 
was not only large in the island as a whole, but also in every one of 
the departments. The following table shows the percentage of farms 
owned and rented by their occupants in the several departments: 



Department. 



Aguadilla 
Arecibo . . 
Bayamon 
Guayama 
Humacao 
Mayaguez 
Ponce 



Farms 


Farms 


owned. 


rented. 


Per cent. 


Per cent 


92 


8 


97 


3 


89 


11 


85 


15 


70 


30 


93 


7 


96 


4 



As is seen, the lowest percentage of owned farms was in Humacao, 
where the proportion of colored was the greatest, but even here seven- 
tenths of the farms were owned by their occupants. The proportion 
ranged up from this to 97 per cent, or practically all the farms, in 
Arecibo, on the northern coast, while in Ponce, Mayaguez, and Agua- 
dilla, also, more than nine-tenths of the farms were owned by their 
occupants. The proportion of ownership was least in the eastern part 
of the island and greatest in the western part. 

From Table XL it appears that 82 per cent of the cultivated area 
of Porto Rico was owned by whites, and 7 per cent was rented by 
whites; 9 per cent was owned by colored, and 1 per cent rented by 



AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 



151 



colored; while the areas which could not be thrown into either of 
these classes comprised onty 1 per cent. Hence, it appears that not 
less than 91 per cent of the cultivated area of the island was occupied 
by its owners, and only 8 per cent was rented. These proportions are 
in strong contrast with those of Cuba, where only 43. 5 per cent were 
owned and 52.1 per cent rented. This general ownership of farms, 
however brought about, has unquestionably had a great influence in 
producing the contented condition of the people of this island as con- 
trasted with the restlessness of the Cubans. 

Classifying the occupancy by race, it is seen that 89 per cent of the 
cultivated area was occupied by whites and only 10 per cent by col- 
ored, showing that, as in Cuba, the whites occupied a much larger 
proportion of the cultivated land than would have been expected 
from their relative number. It follows from this that the average 
area of the cultivated farm occupied by whites was greater than that 
occupied by the colored. That this is true is seen from the following: 

Average area. 

White owners 14 

White renters 17 

Colored, owners - 5 

Colored renters - - 6 

Others 17 

The following table shows, b} r percentages, the proportional area in 
each class of farms: 



Race and tenure. 


0-4 
cuerdas. 


5-9 
cuerdas. 


10-19 
cuerdas. 


20-49 

cuerdas. 


50-99 
cuerdas. 


100 + 

cuerdas. 


Total. 1 


White owners 

White renters 

Colored owners . . . 
Colored renters . . . 


9 

7 
28 
29 

8 


9 
8 

20 
22 
8 


12 
10 
18 
16 

7 


18 
17 
18 
20 
16 


14 
16 
9 
10 
10 


38 
42 
7 
3 
51 


! 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 









It is seen that in the case of white occupants the areas increase with 
the size of farms, while with colored occupants the reverse is the case. 

The following table shows, by percentages, the leading facts regard- 
ing the tenure of farms and the race of occupants for the different 
departments of the island: 

Proportional areas under different kinds of tenure. 
PORTO RICO. 



Department. 



Aguadilla . 

Arecibo 

Bayamon.. 
Guayama . . 
Humacao.. 
Mayaguez . 
Ponce 

Total 



White White Colored Colored 
owners, renters, owners, renters. 



Per cent. 
87 
89 
69 
65 
70 
86 
85 



Per cent. 
6 
2 
16 
16 
14 
4 
5 



Per cent. 
6 
8 
12 
14 
14 



Per cent 

1 



Others. 





1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


1 


1 




2 




1 



Total. 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



152 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OP PORTO RICO, 1899. 

It is seen that the areas owned by whites ranged from 65 per cent 
of all cultivated land in Guavama up to 89 per cent in Arecibo; that 
the largest holdings by the colored were in the eastern departments 
and the smallest holdings in the western; that the holdings of the 
whites ranged in the different departments from 81 to 93 per cent of 
all the cultivated area in the departments, while the holdings of the 
colored ranged from 7 up to 16 per cent. 

FARM PRODUCTS. 

The onty measure of agricultural products which was obtained by 
the census consisted in the area cultivated in each crop. Measured in 
this way, the following table shows the relative importance of each such 
crop, expressed in percentages of the total area of cultivated land: 

Per cent. 

Coffee 41 

Sugar cane 15 

Bananas 14 

Sweet potatoes 8 

Indian corn 4 

Malangas 2 

Rice 2 

Cocoanuts 1 

Tobacco 1 

From the above it is seen that coffee is much the most important 
crop of the island; that sugar cane is of much less relative importance 
than in Cuba, and that tobacco, which is one of the leading crops of 
Cuba, is here of trifling importance. 

To illustrate the tenure of land under different crops and the race of 
the occupant, the following table is presented, showing, for different 
tenures and races in percentages, the proportion which was planted in 
each of the different crops above enumerated: 



Crop. 



Tobacco 

Sugar cane 

Rice 

Sweet potatoes 

Malangas 

Yams 

Bananas 

Cocoanuts 

Coffee 

Indian corn. . . 



White 
owners. 



White 
renters. 



Colored 
owners. 



Colored 
renters. 



It is seen from the above table that of the cultivated area owned by 
whites 47 per cent, or nearly one-half, was planted in coffee. Bananas 
occupied 15 per cent, and sugar cane 11 per cent. Of the area rented 
by whites, on the contrary, 47 per cent was planted in sugar cane and 
but 18 per cent in coffee. This distribution of crops among the areas 
owned by negroes was wider, coffee occupying nearl} r one-third of the 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899. 




AGRICULTUEAL STATISTICS. 



153 



area, while sugar cane, the second most important crop in the island, 
occupied only 2 per cent. Among colored renters the areas were also 
widely scattered. 

The following table shows the proportion of the cultivated land in 
each department which was planted with each of these crops, and thus 
shows the relative importance in the various departments of the several 
crops. In Mnyaguez more than half and in Arecibo half the cultivated 
area was planted in coffee; in Aguadilla and Ponce 43 per cent, and in 
Guayama 38 per cent; sugar cane occupied more than one-half of the 
cultivated area of Humacao, and more than one-fourth that of Bayamon. 
In these two departments, and these only, sugar was of greater impor- 
tance than coffee. 



Crop. 


Agua- 
dilla. 


Arecibo. 


Baya- 
mon. 


Guay- 
ama. 


Huma- 
cao. 


Maya- 
"guez. 


Ponce. 




1 
6 
1 

11 
2 
1 

13 
2 

43 
4 


1 
5 
1 
8 
2 
1 

22 
1 

50 
3 




4 
16 

3 
13 

6 


2 
53 

2 
10 

6 


1 

12 
2 
3 
1 


1 

15 
2 
2 
3 




27 
4 

16 
2 
1 

10 
4 

20 
3 




Sweet potatoes 






11 


6 
1 
9 
1 


12 
2 

54 
6 


16 
12 
43 
4 




Coffee 


38 
3 


Indian corn 



COFFEE. 

Of the total cultivated area of Porto Rico 41 per cent was planted 
in coffee, a statement which at once shows the importance of this crop 
to the island. Of the entire area planted not less than 91 per cent was 
occupied by whites and only 7 per cent by colored, the remaining 2 
per cent being in unknown occupancy. Of the lands occupied by 
whites nearly all, or not less than 88 per cent of all the cultivated land, 
was owned by whites, and of that occupied by colored practically all 
was owned by colored. This high degree of ownership is doubtless 
due to the fact that lands cultivated in coffee must remain in one owner- 
ship for a long time. 

The number of coffee plantations was 21,693, and the entire area 
planted 197,031 cuerdas, an average of only 9 cuerdas per plantation. 
The average size of the coffee plantation owned or occupied by the two 
races was as follows: 

Cuerdas. 

White owners 10 

White renters 7 

Colored owners 3 

Colored renters * 3 

Others 11 



154 



KEPORT ON THE CENSUS OE PORTO RICO, 1899 



The average area of coffee plantations in the several departments of 
the island was as follows: 

Cuerdas. 

Aguadilla 7 

Arecibo 11 

Bayamon 4 

Guayama 7 

Humacao 4 

Mayaguez 11 

Ponce • 11 

The distribution of coffee planting- in the island is shown on the map 
opposite page 153. It is seen from this that coffee planting was most 
important in the western and in the interior parts of the island, mainly 
away from the coast, the hillsides of this region forming the most 
valuable coffee land. 

SUGAR. 

Sugar is, in Porto Rico, a crop of secondary importance. There 
were 2,336 plantations, comprising 73,132 cuerdas, or an average of 
31 cuerdas to a plantation. The departments differed in importance 
in the production of sugar, as follows: 



Department. 



Aguadilla 
Arecibo... 
Bayamon. 
Guayama. 
Humacao. 
Mayaguez 
Ponce 



Number 
of planta- 
tions. 



550 
290 
429 
149 
156 
611 
150 



Cuerdas. 

3,453 

5, 625 
11, 598 

8,310 
16, 743 

9,138 
17, 265 



Area per 
planta- 
tion. 



Cuerdas. 

6 

19 

27 

56 

107 

15 

115 



As is shown by the above table, and also by the accompanying map, 
opposite this page, the production of sugar was carried on mainly in 
the neighborhood of the coast, and particularly in the eastern and 
southeastern parts of the island, Ponce and Humacao being the depart- 
ments of most importance in this regard. 

The following table shows the distribution of sugar growing by race 
of the planter and by tenure of the plantation: 



Race and tenure. 


Number. 


Area. 


Average 
area. 


Percent- 
age of to- 
tal area. 




1,691 

269 

300 

37 

39 


Cuerdas. 

53, 758 

14, 824 

939 

341 

2,284 


Cuerdas. 
32 


75 




55 21 




3 
9 

58 


1 






3 





As is seen from the above table, sugar was produced almost entirely 
by whites, since 96 per cent of all the area was either owned or rented 
by them, and only 1 per cent by colored, and three-fourths of all the 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899 . 




AGKICULTUKAL STATISTICS. 



155 



area was owned by white planters. In the average area of the sugar 
plantations there were also striking- differences. The largest planta- 
tions were those rented by whites, and the next largest were owned by 
whites, while those occupied by the colored were relatively very small. 
Sugar mills and distilleries. — The cultivation of sugar cane and the 
production of sugar, molasses, and rum were, in Porto Rico, industries 
of far less relative importance than in Cuba. As has been shown, the 
area under cultivation in cane was much less. The number of mills 
and distilleries is given by departments in the following table, together 
with their average capacity, that of sugar mills in arrobas (25 pounds 
each) of cane per day, and that of stills in gallons of rum per day. 

Sugar mills and distilleries. 



Department. 


Number 

of sugar 

mills. 


Capacity in 

arrobas of 

cane. 


Average 
capacity. 


Number 
of stills. 


Capacity 
in gallons. 


Average 
capacity. 




55 
33 
61 
32 
32 
100 
32 


Per day. 
45, 085 
69, 835 
172, 370 
134, 766 
269, 589 
161,255 
133, 607 


Per day. 
819 
2,116 
3,171 
4,211 
8,424 
1,612 
4,175 


34 
27 
26 
22 
23 
42 
31 


Per day. 
2,475 
2,864 
3,063 
2,987 
3,635 
3,236 
3,436 


Per day. 

72 
106 
117 
135 
158 

77 

no 




Bayamon 








Total 


345 


986, 507 


2,858 


205 21 fiQfi 


106 









Comparison of this table with the corresponding one for Cuba shows 
that, the number of mills was greater in Porto Rico than in Cuba — 345 
to 207. Their collective capacity, however, was but little more than 
one-tenth as much, and their average capacity was little more than one- 
fifteenth that of the Cuban centrals. The crushing of cane and manu- 
facture of sugar and molasses were carried on in Porto Rico in a retail 
way in small mills. Their product is commonly coarse brown sugar 
and molasses. 

With distilleries the case is the same. The number was nearly two 
and one-half times as great as in Cuba, but their capacity was little 
more than one-eighth, and their average capacity per distillery only 
about one-twentieth. 



TABLES OF POPULATION. 



Table I. — Population by departments. 



Department. 



Porto Rico 

Aguadilla 
Arecibo... 
Bayamon . 
Guayama. 
Humacao. 
Mayaguez 
Ponce 



Total popu- 
lation. 



953,243 



99, 645 
162, 308 
160, 046 
111,986 

s.s,:,m 
127, 566 
203, 191 



Table II. — Population by municipal districts. 



Aguadilla department 99, 645 

Aguada 10, 581 

Aguadilla 17, 830 

Isabela 14,888 

Lares 20, 883 

Moca 12, 410 

Rincon 6, 641 

San Sebastian 16,412 

Arecibo department 162, 308 

Arecibo 86, 910 

Barceloneta 9, 357 

Camuy 10, 887 

Ciales 18, 115 

Hatillo 10, 449 

Manati 13,989 

Morovis 11, 309 

Quebradillas 7,432 

Utuado 43, 860 

Bayamon department 160, 046 

Bayamon 19, 940 

Carolina 11, 965 

Corozal 11,508 

Dorado 3, 804 

Loiza 12, 522 

Naranjito 8, 101 

Rio Grande 12, 365 

Rio Piedras 13, 760 

San Juan 32, 048 

Toa Alta '. 7, 908 

Toa Baja 4, 030 

Trujillo Alto 5, 683 

Vega Alta 6, 107 

Vega Baja 10, 305 

Guayama department Ill, 986 

Aguas Buenas 7, 977 

Arroyo 4, 867 

Caguas 19, sr>7 

Cayey 14, 442 

156 



Guavama department — Continued. 

Cidra 7, 552 

Comerio 8, 249 

Guayama 12, 749 

Gurabo 8, 700 

Juncos 8, 429 

Salinas 5, 731 

San Lorenzo 13, 433 

Humacao department 88, 501 

Fajardo 16, 782 

Humacao 14, 313 

Maunabo 6, 221 

Naguabo 10, 873 

Patillas 11, 163 

Piedras 8, 602 

Vieques 6, 642 

Yabucoa 13, 905 

Mayaguez department 127, 566 

Afiasco 13, 311 

Cabo Rojo 16, 154 

Hormigueros 3, 215 

Lajas 8, 789 

Las Marias 11, 279 

Maricao 8, 312 

Mayaguez 35, 700 

Sabana Grande 10, 560 

San German 20, 246 

Ponce department 203, 191 

Adjuntas 19, 484 

Aibonito 8, 596 

Barranquitas 8, 103 

Barros 14, 845 

Coamo 15, 144 

Guavanilla 9, 540 

Juaria Diaz £7, 896 

Pefiuelas 12, 129 

Ponce 55, 477 

Santa Isabel 4, 858 

Yauco 27, 119 



CENSUS OF PORTO RICO 1899. 



PORTO RICO 

RELATIVE AREAS CULTIVATED IN PRINCIPAL CROPS 




AHoenS Co.Balto. Lith. 



POPULATION BY DISTRICTS. 



157 



Table III. — Total population by wards. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



Total population 99, 645 

Aguada district 10, 581 

Atalaya and Jaguey 1, 195 

Carrizal and Espinal 1, 010 

Cerro Gordo 843 

Cruces, Guayabo, and Rio Grande 1, 533 

Lagunas 753 

Mal-paso and Guanabanas 723 

Mamey '. 558 

Marias ' 746 

Naranjo 923 

Piedras Blancas and Asomante 1, 162 

Rosario, California, and Guanaguilla. 1, 135 

Aguadilla district 17, 830 

Aguacate and Arenales 991 

Barrio Nuevo 1, 537 

Borinquen 1, 271 

Caimital bajo 943 

Camaseyes 1, 633 

Ceiba alta and Ceiba baja 1, 033 

Corrales and Caimital alto 1, 158 

Guerrero 638 

Iglesia and Higuey 1, 756 

Malesas alta 784 

Malesas baja 905 

Montana 633 

Palmar 700 

Santa Barbara 1, 502 

Tamarindc 1, 630 

Victoria 716 

Isabela district 14, 888 

Arenales altos 1, 559 

Arenales bajos 833 

Bajura 647 

Bejucos 1, 257 

Coto 1, 349 

Galateo alto 1, 063 

Galateo bajo 705 

Guayabos 818 

Guerrero 753 

Jobos 1, 551 

Llanadas 1, 564 

Mora 972 

Planas 936 

Pueblo 881 

Lares district 20, 883 

Bartolo 2, 035 

Buenos-Aires 1, 449 



Lares district — Continued. 

Callejones 2, 152 

Espino 1, 148 

Lares 1, 954 

Latorre 2, 008 

Mirasol 1,027 

Pezuela 1, 010 

Piletas 2, 455 

Poblacion 2, 264 

Pueblo 1,450 

Rio Prieto 1, 931 

Moea district 12, 410 

Aeeituna 1, 067 

Capa 898 

Centro 601 

Cerro Gordo 1, 008 

Cruz 954 

Cuchilla 1, 552 

Maria 1, 062 

Naranjo 966 

Plata 663 

Pueblo 1, 470 

Rocha 902 

Voladoras 1, 267 

Rincon district 6, 641 

Barrero and Atalaya 1, 157 

Calvache 708 

Cruz 770 

Ensenada 674 

Jaguey 576 

Pueblo 1, 074 

Puntas 1,006 

Rio Grande 676 

San Sebastian district 16, 412 

Aibonito 993 

Altosano and Sonador 862 

Calabazas 746 

Guacio 562 

Guajataca and Cibao 1, 169 

Guatemala and Bahomamey 1, 126 

Hato arriba 663 

Hoya mala 1, 215 

Juncal 761 

Magos and Enea 1, 003 

Mirabeles 404 

Perchas No. 1 and 2 1, 429 

Piedras Blancas and Cidrae 1,125 

Pozas and Culebrinas 1, 008 

Robles and Salto 1, 646 

Urrejola and Norzagaray 1, 700 



DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



' 



Total population 162, 308 

Arecibo district 36, 910 

Arecibo City 8, 008 

Arenalejos 1, 228 

Arrozal 1, 662 

Cambalache 470 

Carrera 676 

Domingo Ruiz 931 

Dominguito 1, 093 

Esperanza 2, 843 

Factor 1, 072 

Garrochales 950 

Hato abajo 1, 869 

Hato arriba 1, 751 

Hato viejo 2, 588 

Islote 2, 498 

Miraflores 1, 416 

Rio arriba 1, 709 

Sabana Hoyos 3, 568 

Santana 1, 555 

Tanama 1, 023 



Barceloneta district 9, 357 

Barceloneta 1, 459 

Florida adentro 2,002 

Florida afuera 3, 579 

Garrochales 1, 058 

Palmas altas 1, 259 

Camuy district 10, 887 

Abra honda 1, 420 

Camuy arriba 774 

Camuy ..., 989 

Cienega 711 

Cibao 695 

Membrillo 769 

Piedra Gorda 895 

Puente 718 

Puertos 419 

Quebrada 1, 213 

Santiago 657 

Yeguada 794 

Zanja 833 



158 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table III. — Total population by wards — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO— Continued. 



Ciales district 18, 115 

Ciales 1, 356 

Cialitos 2, 522 

Cordillera 1, 425 

Fronton 3, 706 

Hato Viejo - 1, 800 

Jagua 1, 264 

Pesa 994 

Pozas 2, 796 

Toro Negro 2, 252 

Hatillo district 10, 449 

Aibonito 1, 606 

Bayaney 1, 394 

Capaez 1,016 

Carrizales 969 

Corcovada 1, 065 

Hatillo 676 

Naranjito 966 

Pajuil 130 

Pueblo 669 

Yeguadilla occidental 963 

Yeguadilla oriental 995 

Manati district 13, 989 

Bajura adentra 881 

Baj ura afuera 739 

Coto 2,110 

Manati City 4, 494 

Rio arriba Poniente 1, 862 

Rio arriba Saliente 1. 593 

Tierras nuevas Poniente 1, 534 

Tierras nuevas Saliente 776 

Morovis district 11, 309 

Barahona 854 

Cuchilla 716 

Franquez 695 

Monte Llano 466 

Morovis Norte 821 

Morovis Sur 487 

Morovis 1, 064 



Morovis district — Continued. 

Pasto 1, 314 

Percha 1, 124 

Rio Grande 841 

San Lorenzo 884 

Torrecilla 572 

Unibon 643 

Vaga 828 

Quebradillas district 7,432 

Cacaos 1 , 066 

Charcas " 330 

Cocos 978 

Guajataca 666 

Quebradillas 1, 166 

San Antonio 1, 760 

San Jose 687 

Terranova 779 

Utuado district 43,860 

Angeles 2, 456 

Arenas 1, 577 

Caguana 2, 555 

Caniaco 631 

Caonillas 2, 378 

Consejo 929 

Don Alonso 1,610 

Guaonico 771 

Jayuya abajo 3, 597 

Jayuya arriba 5, 700 

Liinon 857 

Mameyes 4, 268 

Palmas, Las 647 

Paso Palrna 1, 317 

Rio Abajo 1, 235 

Roncador 1, 130 

Sabana Grande 1, 053 

Salto abajo 836 

Sal to arriba 855 

Santa Isabel 875 

Santa Rosa 793 

Tetuan 1, 678 

Utuado City 3, 619 

Vivi abajo 1, 253 

Vivi arriba 1, 240 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Total population 160, 046 

Bayamon district 19, 940 

Buena Vista 1, 028 

Camarones 620 

Cataflo 2,331 

Cerro Gordo 845 

Dajaos 851 

Guaraguaos abajo 837 

Guaraguaos arriba 681 

Guaraguaos de Guaynabo 763 

Guaynabo 465 

Hato Teja 1, 358 

Juan Sanchez 926 

Minillas 1, 000 

Nuevo 1> 123 

Pajaros 1, 492 

Palmas 406 

Pueblo 2, 218 

Pueblo Yiejo 480 

Santa Olaya L 100 

Santa Rosa 687 

Sonadora 729 

Carolina district 11, 965 

Borrasa alto 889 

Borrasa bajo «. 764 

Cacao 1, 225 

Cangrejos 367 

Canovanillas 950 

Carruzos 637 



Carolina district— Continued. 

Cedros 724 

Hoyo-Mulas 1, 245 

Martin Gonzalez 708 

Pueblo 2, 177 

Sabana abaja 578 

San Antonio 615 

Santa Cruz 435 

Trujillo bajo 651 

Corozal district 11,508 

Abras 1,183 

Cibuco 1,096 

Cuehillas 585 

Dos Bocas 909 

Magueves 849 

Maria 1,133 

Negros 818 

Padilla 840 

Palmarejo 901 

Palmarito 770 

Palos Blancos 1, 367 

Pueblo 1,057 

Dorado district 8, 804 

Espinosa 737 

Higuillar 820 

Maguayo 764 

Mameval 169 

Pueblo 937 

Rio Lajas - . - 377 



POPULATION BY WARDS. 



159 



Table III. — Total population by ivards — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON— Continued. 



Loiza district 12, 522 

Canovanas 1, 942 

Cubeu 1, 225 

Hato-Puerco 3, 139 

Lomas 1, 614 

Mediania 2, 296 

Pueblo £33 

Torrecillas 1, 473 

Naranjito district 8, 101 

Achiote 1, 094 

Anones 1, 420 

Cedro abajo 977 

Cedro arriba 915 

Guadiana 1, 006 

Loina 994 

Nuevo 1, 081 

Pueblo 614 

Rio Grande district 12, 365 

Cienega 1, 610 

Guzman abajo - 1, 378 

Guzman arriba 1, 047 

Hato Viejo 473 

Herrera 221 

Jimenez 1, 773 

Mameyes 2, 070 

Mata de Platano 717 

Pueblo 1 , 285 

Sabana 600 

Zarzal 1, 191 

Rio Piedras district 13, 760 

Caimito alto 779 

Caimito bajo 927 

Cupey 1, 834 

Frailes 562 

Hato Nuevo 683 

Hato Rey 1, 324 

Mamey 636 

Monacillo 1, 295 

Pueblo 2, 249 

Quebrada Arenas '. 716 

Rio 651 

Sabana Liana 1, 644 

Tortugo 460 

San Juan district 32, 048 

Ballaja 1, 217 

Caleta 3, 307 

Catedral 2, 497 

Marina 2, 144 

Mercado 2, 038 

Puerta de Tierra 5, 453 



San Juan district — Continued. 

San Cristobal 3, 131 

San Francisco 1, 177 

Santurce 5, 840 

Teatro 2, 592 

Institutions 2, 652 

Toa Alta district 7, 908 

Contorno 653 

Galatea 606 

Mucarabonaz 954 

Ortiz 948 

Pinas 841 

Pueblo 991 

Quebrada Arenas 777 

Quebrada Cruz 1, 165 

Rio Lajas 973 

Toa Baja district 4, 030 

Candelaria 1, 395 

Media Luna 598 

Pueblo 1, 300 

Sabana Seca 737 

Trujillo Alto district 5, 683 

Carraiza 1, 159 

Cuevas 688 

Dos Bocas 369 

Pueblo 1, 025 

Quebrada Grande 955 

Quebrada Inflerno 1, 487 

Vega Alta district 6, 107 

Bajura 749 

Candelaria 863 

Espinosa 781 

Maricao 741 

Novillo 982 

Pueblo 1, 081 

Sabana 910 

Vega Baja district 10, 305 

Algarrobo 877 

Almirante Norte 902 

Almirante Sur 847 

Cabo Caribe 277 

Ceiba 469 

Cibuco 310 

Pueblo 2,288 

Puerto Nuevo 706 

Pugnado Adentro 425 

Pugnado Afuera 1, 336 

Quebrada Arenas 348 

Rio arriba and Rio abajo 1, 092 

Yeguada 428 



DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



Total population Ill, 986 

Aguas Buenas district 7, 977 

Bairoa and Jagueyes 1, 099 

Bayamoncito 765 

Caguitas 856 

Juan Asencio 1, 029 

Mulita 752 

Pueblo 1, 309 

Sonadora and Mulas 1, 183 

Sumidero 984 

Arroyo district 4, 867 

Guasimas, Palmas, and Ancones 596 

Laurel 1,333 

Pitahaya 801 

Pueblo 2, 137 



Caguas district 19, 857 

Beatriz 868 

Borinquen and Bairoa 3, 870 

Cafiabon 1, 309 

Caflaboncito 1, 400 

Pueblo 5, 450 

Rio Canas 1, 336 

San Antonio 887 

San Salvador 1, 605 

Tomas de Castro 1, 575 

Turabo 1, 557 

Cayey district 14, 442 

Beatriz and Guavate 853 

Cercadillo and Lapa 1, 047 

Jacome alto 1, 246 

Jacome bajo andSumido 961 

Pedro Avila and Pasto viejo 886 



160 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table III. — Total population l>i/ wards — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA— Continued. 



Cayey district — Continued. 

Piedra and Maton abajo 965 

Pueblo 3, 763 

Quebrada arriba, Culebras bajo, and 

Culebras alto 914 

Rincon and Monte Llano 1, 374 

Toita and Maton arriba 1, 390 

Vega, Farallon, and Cedro 1, 043 

Cidra district 7, 552 

Bayamon and Monte Llano 1, 222 

Beatriz and Arenas 997 

Ceiba and Rio abajo 1, 100 

Hondura and Toita 800 

Pueblo 1, 034 

Rabanal and Salto 1, 498 

Sur and Rincon 901 

Comerio district 8, 249 

Cedrito and Cejas 1, 158 

Dona Elena 1, 460 

Palomas 1, 091 

Piiias and Vega 1, 373 

Pueblo 1, 191 

Naranjo 815 

Rio Hondo 1, 161 

Guayama district 12, 749 

Caimital 603 

Carite 834 

Carmen 784 

Guamani 1 , 360 

Jobos 1, 186 

Machete 368 

Palmas 1 , 200 

Pozo-Hondo and Algarrobo 1, 080 

Pueblo 5, 334 



Gurabo district 8, 700 

Celada 964 

Hato Nuevo 1, 361 

Jagua 868 

Jagual and Masas 1 , 270 

Mamey 680 

Pueblo 1, 309 

Quebrada Inflerno and Navarro 1, 093 

Rincon 1, 155 

Juncos district 8, 429 

Ceiba Norte and Ceiba Sur 1, 408 

Gurabo arriba and Caimito 1, 295 

Lirios 815 

Mamey and Gurabo abajo 1, 679 

Pueblo 2, 026 

Valenciano abajo and Valenciano 

arriba 1,206 

Salinas district : 6, 731 

Aguirre 1, 291 

Lapa 1, 019 

Palma and Quebrada Yeguas 981 

Pueblo 1, 192 

Rio Jueyes 1, 248 

San Lorenzo district 13, 433 

Cerro Gordo 1, 452 

Espino 1, 522 

Florida 807 

Hato 1, 028 

Jagual 1, 024 

Pueblo 2,084 

Quebrada 1, 193 

Quebrada Arena 1, 452 

Quebrada Honda 1, 616 

Quemado 1, 255 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



Total population 88,501 

Fajardo district 16, 782 

Cabezas and Demajagua 1, 168 

Ceiba and Machose 1, 214 

Chupacallos and Saco 1, 109 

Fajardo 3, 414 

Florencio and Quebrada Vuelta 1, 289 

Juan Martinez and Sabana 1, 029 

Pitahaya 1, 103 

Poblado de Luquillo 903 

Quebrada Fajardo 888 

Quebrada Seca and Guayacan 820 

Rio abajo 1, 021 

Rio abajo and Daguao 1, 099 

Rio arriba 726 

Sardinera and Naranjo 999 

Humaeao district 14, 313 

Anton Ruiz 987 

Buena Vista 985 

Candelero abajo 972 

Candelero arriba 811 

Catano and Mabu 1, 179 

Collores 1 , 016 

Mambiche and Rio abajo 1, 289 

Marianao 1 , 296 

Playa 64« 

San Juan 1 , 169 

Santiago and San Francisco 1, 754 

Santo Domingo 1, 505 

Tejas 704 

Maunabo district 6, 221 

Calzada and Lizas 1 , 233 

Emajagua 828 



Maunabo district — Continued. 

Matuyas bajo and alto 941 

Palo-seco 802 

Pueblo 1, 277 

Quebrada Arenas and Talante 1, 140 

Naguabo district 10, 873 

Daguao 756 

Duque 1, 238 

Hucares 826 

Maizales 1, 060 

Mariana 1, 280 

Pefia-pobre 1, 064 

Pueblo 1, 812 

Rio Blanco abajo 976 

Rio Blanco arriba 959 

Santiago Luna and Rio 902 

Patillas district 11, 163 

Bajo and Jacaboa 1, 198 

Cacao alto and Jagual 1, 018 

Cacao bajo and Quebrada arriba 928 

Guardarraya 1, 013 

Mamey and Apeadero 1, 249 

Maton and Guavabote 1, 189 

Mulas 823 

Pueblo 1, 590 

Rio Arriba 1,080 

Rios and Polios 1, 075 

Piedras district 8, 602 

Colores and Boqueron 1, 528 

Montones abajo 899 

Montones arriba 937 

Pueblo and Quebrada Arenas 1, 449 

Rio abajo 1,122 



POPULATION BY WARDS. 



161 



Table III. — Total population by wards — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO— Continued. 



Piedras district — Continued. 

Rio arriba 1, 028 

Tejas alto 948 

Vegas abajo 691 

Vieques district 6, 642 

Culebra Island 704 

Mosquito and Llave 1, 069 

Pueblo and Florida 2, 646 

Puerto Real abajo 636 

Puerto Real arriba 708 

Punta Arenas, Puerto Ferro, and 

Puerto Diablo 879 



Yabucoa district 13, 905 

Aguacate 1, 374 

Calabazas 1, 891 

Camino Nuevo l, 435 

Guayabota 904 

Guayanes 801 

Jacana l, 101 

Juan Martin 1, 473 

Limones 1, 139 

Playa 1, 016 

Pueblo 1, 838 

Teja 933 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Total population 127,566 

Afiasco district (Mayaguez) 13, 311 

Afiasco arriba and Afiasco abajo 1, 027 

Caguabo and Playa 1, 156 

Cercado, Rio-ariba, and Casey-abajo. . 1, 019 

Cerro-gordo and Corcovado 1, 159 

Cuarteles primero and tercero 1, 149 

Cuarteles segundo and cuarto 1, 334 

Daguey and Humatas 938 

Espino, Cidra, and Carreras 1, 281 

Hatillo and Caracol 1, 030 

Marias and Quebrada Larga 923 

Ovejas, Casey arriba, and Rio Cafias . . 1, 257 

Pinales 1, 038 

Cabo Rojo district 16, 154 

Bajura 1, 218 

Boqueron 1, 185 

Guanajibo 1, 074 

Llanos Costa 867 

Llanos Tuna 2, 976 

Miradero 2, 011 

Monte Grande 2,019 

Pedernales 2, 060 

Pueblo 2, 744 

Hormigueros district 3, 215 

Hormigueros and Jaguita 965 

Lavadero and Benavente 1, 047 

Pueblo and Guanajibo 1,203 

Lajas district 8, 789 

Candelaria 1, 008 

Costa and Parguera 1, 256 

Lajas arriba 1, 152 

Palmarejo and Llanos 1, 160 

Paris 875 

Pueblo 1, 385 

Sabana Yeguas 938 

Santa Rosa and Plata 1, 015 

Las Marias district 11, 279 

Alto Songo 885 

Anones 1, 251 

Bucarabones 761 

Buenavista 1, 120 

Cerrote 864 

Chamorro and Espino 986 

Naranjales and Furnias 1, 255 

Palma Escrita 1, 143 

Pueblo and Maravilla 1, 235 

Purisima Concepcion 1 , 007 

Rio Cafias 772 

Maricao district 8, 312 

Bucarabones 1, 354 

Indiera alta 1, 145 

8490—00 11 



Maricao district — Continued. 

Indiera baja 933 

Indiera Fnos 1, 165 

Maricao afuera 1, 390 

Montoso 1, 146 

Pueblo 1, 179 

Mayaguez district 35, 700 

Algarrobo 1, 054 

Bateyes l, 019 

Candelaria 2, 609 

Carcel 4,585 

Guanajibo 1, 032 

Juan Alonso 1,041 

Leguisamo 1, 228 

Limon 870 

Marina Meridional 1, 611 

Marina Septentrional 2, 934 

Mayaguez arriba 2, 187 

Miradero 1, 268 

Mona, island 6 

Montoso 988 

Quebrada Grande 1, 035 

Quernado 952 

Rio 1, 722 

Rio Cafias abajo 1,095 

Rio Cafias arriba and Naranjales 1, 048 

Rio Hondo and Malezas .' 1, 072 

Rosario 852 

Sabalos 2, 365 

Sabanetas 1, 401 

Salud 1, 726 

Sabana Grande district 10, 560 

Machuchal 999 

Pueblo 2, 531 

Rayo 1, 222 

Rincon 1, 244 

Santana 921 

Susua and Torre 1, 755 

Tabonuco 1, 888 

San German district 20, 246 

Cain alto 1 643 

Cain bajo 942 

Cotui 811 

Duey bajo 943 

Guama 1, 188 

Hoconuco alto 943 

Hoconuco bajo 1, 047 

Minillas 1, 657 

Pueblo central 1, 493 

Pueblo occidental 821 

Pueblo oriental 1, 640 

Retiro 983 

Rosario alto 811 

Rosario bajo 1,027 

Rosario Pefion and Duey alto 1, 100 

Sabana Eneas and Ancones 1, 132 

Sabana Grande abajo 1, 021 

Tuna and Maresua 1, 044 



162 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table III. — Total population bywords — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Total population 203, 191 

Adjuntas district 19, 484 

« lapaea l, 266 

Garzas 1, 425 

Guayabo Dulce 1, 055 

Guayo and Vega aba jo 1, 275 

Guilarte 1, 019 

Juan Gonzalez and Portugues 1,235 

Limani 1, 075 

Pellejas 1, 521 

Portillo 1,271 

Pueblo 1, 963 

Saltillo 2, 098 

Tanama 752 

Vega arriba 1, 159 

Yabuecas 1, 710 

Yayales 660 

Aibonito district 8, 596 

Algarrobo and Llano 1, 226 

Asomante andCaonillas 1,245 

Cuvon 1, 027 

Norte and Sur 2, 085 

Pastos and Roble 1, 459 

Plata 1,554 

Barranquitas district 8, 103 

Barrancas 692 

Cafiabon 1, 117 

Helechal 1, 485 

Honduras 862 

Palo lincado 1, 299 

Pueblo 666 

Quebrada grande 931 

Quebradillas 1, 051 

Barros district 14, 845 

Ala de la Piedra and Orocovis 1, 403 

Barros 987 

Bauta abajo 1, 603 

Bermejales 1, 317 

Botijas 891 

Collores and Cacaos 1, 588 

Damian abajo 922 

Damian arriba 839 

Gato 876 

Pellejas and Bauta arriba 1, 331 

Pueblo 962 

Sabana and Mata de caiia 1, 089 

Saltos 1, 037 

Coamo district 15, 144 

Cayales 989 

Coamo arriba 1, 223 

Cuyon and Palmarejo 1, 397 

Ermita 1, 400 

Este and Oeste 1, 844 

Llanos. 1, 064 

Pasto 1, 272 

Pedro Garcia 1, 697 

Pulguillas 1, 142 

San Ildefonso 1, 252 

Santa Catalina 1, 864 

Guayanilla district 9, 540 

Barrero and Macana 1, 154 

Indios and Boca 782 

Jagua and Concejo 1, 162 

Llano and Quebradas 977 

Magas and Plava 962 

Pasto 1, 276 

Pueblo 973 

Quebrada-honda and Jagua-Pasto 1,467 

Sierra baja 787 



Juana Diaz district 27, 896 

Armuelas 1, 010 

Capitanejo 1, 338 

Caonilla abajo 1, 558 

Caonilla arriba 2, 200 

Cintrona 1, 132 

Collores . 2, 835 

Este and Oeste 941 

Guayabal 2, 034 

Hato-Puerco abajo 991 

Hato-Puerco arriba 1, 496 

Jacaguas and Callado 936 

Lomas and Sabana Liana 938 

Norte and Sur 1, 305 

Rio Cafias abajo 1, 066 

Rio Cafias arriba 990 

Tijeras and Emajagual 1, 005 

Vacas 1, 841 

Villalba abajo 1, 363 

Villalba arriba 2, 917 

Pefiuelas district 12, 129 

Barreal 922 

Cuevasand Tallaboa Saliente 940 

Encarnacion and Coto 1,271 

Jagua 971 

Macana 1, 025 

Pueblo 1, 129 

Quebrada Ceiba 1, 006 

Rucio 2, 233 

Santo Domingo . . . : 812 

Tallaboa alta 946 

Tallaboa Poniente 874 

Ponce district 55, 477 

Anon 1, 734 

Barrio primero 1, 592 

Barrio segundo 5, 866 

Barrio tercero 1, 808 

Barrio cuarto 3, 364 

Barrio quinto 4, 511 

Bucana-Vayas 1, 315 

Caja de Muertoa i island) 64 

Canas 2, 680 

Cantera 5, 321 

Capitanejo 1, 161 

Cerrillos 518 

Coto-Laurel 1, 884 

Guaraguaos 1, 771 

Machuelo abajo 1, 893 

Machuelo arriba 1,413 

Magueyes 1, 171 

Maraguez 1, 756 

Marueflo 1, 105 

Montes Llanos 964 

Playa 4, 660 

Portugues 1, 050 

Quebrada Limon 547 

Real 1, 440 

Sabanetas 1, 065 

San Anton 963 

San Patricio 1, 217 

Tibes 1, 878 

Institutions 766 

Santa Isabel district 4, 858 

Boca, Velazquez, and Descalabra&o... 1,033 

Felicia No. 1 and No. 2 1, 130 

Jauca' No. 1 and No. 2 1, 553 

Pueblo and Playa 1,142 

Yauco district 27, 119 

Aguas Blancas 1, 170 

Algarrobos 952 

Almacigo bajo 793 

Barinas 1, 432 



POPULATION OF CITIES. 



163 



Table III. — Total population by wards — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF PONCE— Continued. 



Yauco district— Continued. 

Coilores 893 

Duey 1,264 

Frailes 919 

Guanica 2, 700 

Insua alta and Ciego Hernandez 1, 171 

Insua baja 811 

Jacana and Almacigo alto 1, 077 

Naranjo 1, 358 



Yauco district — Continued. 

Pueblo Norte 3, 564 

Pueblo Sur 2, 544 

Quebradas 1, 009 

Rancheras 1, 220 

Rio Prieto 799 

Rubias 627 

Sierra alta 1, 411 

Vegas and Caimito 1, 405 



Table IV. — Total population of cities. 



City. 



Department. 



Popula- 
tion. 



Adjuntas 

Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Aguas Buenas. . 

Aibonito 

Afiasco 

Areeibo 

Arroyo 

Bayamon 

Barceloneta 

CaboRojo 

Caguas 

Carolina 

Cayey 

Ceiba 

Ciales 

Cidra 

Coamo 

Comerio 

Corozal 

Fajardo 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Hurnacao 

JuanaDiaz 

Juncos 

Lajas 

Lares 

Manati 

Maunabo 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

Moca 

Morovis 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

Quebradillas . . . 

Rincon 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

Sabana Grande 

Salinas 

San German . . . 

San Juan 

San Lorenzo . . . 
San Sebastian . . 
Santa Isabel . . . 

Toa, baja 

Trujillo, alto... 
Utuado 



Vega, baja . 

Vieques 

Yabucoa . . . 
Yauco 



Ponce 

Aguadilla . 
do 

Guayama.. 

Ponce 

Mayaguez . 
Areeibo . . . 
Guayama.. 
Bayamon.. 

Areeibo 

Mayaguez . 
Guayama.. 
Bayamon.. 
Guayama.. 
Hurnacao. . 
Areeibo . . . 
Guayama.. 

Ponce 

Guayama.. 
Bayamon.. 
Hurnacao. . 
Guavama.. 

do 

Hurnacao.. 

Ponce 

Guayama.. 
Mayaguez . 
Aguadilla . 

Areeibo 

Hurnacao.. 
Mayaguez . 

do 

Aguadilla . 

Areeibo 

Hurnacao. . 

do 

Ponce 

do 

Areeibo ... 
Aguadilla . 
Bayamon.. 

do 

Mayaguez . 

Guayama. 

Mayaguez 

Bayamon . 

Guayama. 

Aguadilla 

Ponce 

Bayamon . 

do 

Areeibo... 
Bayamon . 
.....do.... 
Hurnacao. 

do 

Ponce 



1,963 
1,135 
6,425 
1,309 
2,085 
2,483 
8,008 
2,137 
2,218 
1,459 
2,744 
5,450 
2.177 
3; 763 
1,214 
1,356 
1,034 
3,244 
1,191 
1,057 
3,414 
5,334 
1,309 
4,428 
2,246 
2, 026 
1,385 
3,714 
4,494 
1,277 
1,179 

15, 187 
1,470 
1,064 
1,812 
1,590 
1,129 

27,952 
1,166 
1,074 
1,285 
2,249 
2,531 
1,192 
3,954 

32, 048 
2, 084 
1,700 
1,142 
1,300 
1,025 
3,619 
1,081 
2,288 
2,646 
1,838 
6,108 



164 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table V. — Sex, general 





Department. 


All classes. 


Native white. 


Foreign white. 




Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 


99, 645 
162, 308 
160, 046 
111,986 

88, 501 
127, 566 
203, 191 


49, 224 
80, 901 
78, 229 
55, 216 
43, 984 
62, 750 
101,957 


50,421 
81,407 
81,817 
56, 770 
44,517 
64,816 
101,234 


84. 563 
123, 601 

74,210 
56, 041 
40, 246 

80. 564 
118, 784 


41,776 
61,254 
35, 901 
27, 619 
19, 846 
39, 825 
59, 282 


42, 787 
62, 347 
38, 309 
28, 422 
20, 400 
40, 939 
59, 502 


735 
1,458 
4,018 
764 
559 
1,480 
2,403 


587 
1,121 
3,097 
653 
449 
1,099 
1,886 


148 
337 
921 
111 
110 
381 
517 




Porto Rico.. 


8 


953, 243 


472, 261 


480, 982 


578, 009 


285, 303 


292, 706 


11,417 


8,892 


2,525 



DEPARTMENT 





District. 


All classes. 


Native white. 


Foreign white. 




Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


1 




10, 581 
17, 830 
14, 888 
20, 883 
12,410 
6,641 
16, 412 


5,228 
8,580 
7,146 
10, 483 
6,244 
3,344 
8,199 


5, 353 
9, 250 
7, 742 
10, 400 
6,166 
3,297 
8,213 


8,849 
13, 432 
12, 892 
18, 252 
10, 941 

5,644 
14, 553 


4,389 
6,473 
6,206 
9,114 
5,543 
2,825 
7,226 


4,460 
6,959 
6,686 
9,138 
5,398 
2,819 
7,327 


41 
219 

82 
277 
17 
17 
82 


32 
179 
54 
231 
12 
16 
63 


9 
40 
28 
46 
5 
1 
19 


2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 

Moca 


7 


San Sebastian . . . 

The depart- 
ment 


8 


99, 645 


49, 224 


50,421 


84,563 41,776 


42,787 


735 


587 


148 



DEPARTMENT 



1 




36, 910 
9,357 
10, 887 
18, 115 
10,449 
13, 989 
11, 309 
7,432 
43, 860 


18, 403 
4,724 
5, 271 
9,074 
5,164 
6,864 
5,672 
3, 579 

22, 150 


18, 507 
4,633 
5,616 
9,041 
5, 285 
7,125 
5, 637 
3, 853 

21, 710 


25, 453 
5, 255 
9,747 

13, 942 
8, 590 
7, 955 
9, 197 
6, 611 

36, 851 


12, 681 
2, 617 
4,724 
6,863 
4, 205 
3,876 
4,578 
3,183 

18, 527 


12, 772 
2,638 
5, 023 
7,079 
4,385 
4,079 
4,619 
3,428 

18, 324 


417 
66 
154 
148 
131 
140 
39 
56 
307 


323 
49 
90 

131 
80 

112 
35 
30 

271 


94 
17 
64 
17 
61 
28 
4 
26 
36 


2 

3 


Barceloneta 


4 




5 


Hatillo . . . 


6 




7 




8 
q 


Quebradillas 




The depart- 
ment 


10 


162, 308 


80, 901 


81,407 


123, 601 


61,254 


! 
62,347 j 1,458 


1,121 


337 



DEPARTMENT 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto ... 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The depart 
ment 



19, 940 

11, 965 

11,508 

3,804 

12, 522 

8,101 

12, 365 

13, 760 

32, 048 

7,908 

4,030 

5, 683 

6,107 

10, 305 



160, 046 



9,722 
5,915 
5,574 
1,882 
6, 287 
4,026 
6,110 
6,688 
15,100 
3,963 
2,038 
2, 821 
3,011 
5,092 



78, 229 



10,218 


9,866 


4,778 


6, 050 


4, 578 


2, 310 


5, 934 


7,286 


3,533 


1,922 


1,019 


500 


6, 235 


5,487 


2,798 


4,075 


6,308 


3,148 


6,255 


4,903 


2,387 


7,072 


4,993 


2,388 


16, 948 


12, 391 


5,541 


3,945 


4,987 


2,451 


1, 992 


912 


445 


2,862 


2,898 


1, 459 


3,096 


2, 527 


1,241 


5, 213 


6, 055 


2,922 


81, 817 


74, 210 


35, 901 



5, 088 
2,268 
3,753 

5-19 
2,689 
3,160 
2, 516 
2, 605 
6, 850 
2,536 

467 
1, 439 
1,286 
3,133 



3s,:;09 



330 
100 

56 
41 
57 
30 
71 

231 
2,872 
29 
47 
35 
19 

100 



4,018 



26 
50 
25 
60 
190 
,190 
26 
37 
27 
16 
79 



3,097 



91 

16 
8 

15 
7 
5 

11 

41 

682 

3 

10 
8 
3 

21 



921 



SEX, NATIVITY, AND EACE. 



165 



nativity, and race. 

RICO. 



Negro. 


Mixed. 


Chinese. 




Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 




2,953 
4,305 
20, 160 
7,620 
8,562 
5,966 
9, 824 


1,414 
2,195 
9,722 
3,861 
4,368 
2,815 
4,747 


1,539 
2,110 
10, 438 
3,759 
4,194 
3,151 
5,077 


11,394 
32, 931 
61,628 
47, 552 
39, 134 
39, 547 
72,166 


5,447 
16, 318 
29,481 
23, 074 
19, 321 
19, 206 
36, 031 


5, 947 
16,613 
32, 147 

24, 478 








1 


13 

30 

9 


13 

28 
9 




? 


2 


3 
4 


19, 813 


| 




5 


20, 341 
36, 135 


9 ! 5 
14 11 


4 
3 


6 

7 


59. 390 


29, 122 


30, 268 


304, 352 


148, 878 


155, 474 


75 


66 


9 


8 



OF AGUADILLA. 



Negro. 


Mixed. 


Chinese. 




Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 




530 
1,018 
416 
238 
273 
182 
296 


263 
458 
205 
118 
137 
90 
143 


267 
560 
211 
120 
136 
92 
153 


1,161 
3,161 
1,498 
2,116 
1,179 
798 
1,481 


544 
1,470 
681 
1,020 
552 
413 
767 


617 
1,691 
817 
1,096 
627 
385 
714 








1 








9 








3 








4 








5 








6 








7 










2,953 


1,414 


1,539 


11, 394 


5,447 


5,947 








8 











OF ARECIBO. 



1,819 
274 
319 
173 
164 
812 
160 
136 
448 


903 

133 

148 

96 

86 

448 

81 

65 

235 


916 
141 
171 
77 
78 
364 
79 
71 
213 


9,216 

3,762 
667 
3, 852 
1,564 
5, 078 
1,913 
629 
6,250 


4,491 
1,925 

309 
1,984 

793 
2,424 

978 

301 
3,113 


4,725 
1,837 

358 
1,868 

771 
2,654 

935 

328 
3,137 


5 


5 




1 




9 








3 








4 








5 


4 


4 




fi 




7 








8 




4 




4 




9 


4,305 


2,195 


2,110 


32, 931 


16, 318 


16,613 13 


13 




10 



OF BAYAMON. 



1,633 

2, 822 
364 
662 

2,457 

256 

996 

, 2, 806 

5,236 
430 
922 
471 
185 
920 


826 

1,363 

172 

334 

1,197 

128 

502 

1,406 

2,245 

237 

478 

240 

100 

494 


807 

1,459 

192 

328 

1,260 

128 

494 

1,400 

2,991 

193 

444 

231 

85 

426 


8,109 
4,465 
3,797 
2,082 
4, 521 
1,507 
6,395 
5,728 
11,529 
2,462 
2,149 
2,279 
3,375 
3,230 


3,877 
2,158 
1,818 
1,022 
2,242 
725 
3,161 
2,702 
5,104 
1,249 
1,078 
1,095 
1,653 
1,597 


4,232 
2,307 
1,979 
1,060 
2,279 
782 
3,234 
3,026 
6,425 
1,213 
1,071 
1,184 
1,722 
1,633 


2 


2 




1 




? 


5 


3 


2 


3 
4 








5 








6 








7 


2 
20 


2 
20 




8 




9 

10 








11 








1" 


1 


1 




13 
14 










20, 160 


9,722 


10, 438 


61, 628 


29,481 


32, 147 


30 


28 


2 


15 



166 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table V. — Sex, general 

DEPARTMENT 





District. 


All classes. 


Native white. 


Foreign white. 




Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


1 

? 


Aguas Buenas . . . 


7,977 
4,867 

19, 857 

14,442 
7,552 
8, 249 

12, 749 
8, 700 
8,429 
5,731 

13, 433 


3,868 
2,294 
9, 840 
7,103 
3,775 
4,129 
6,146 
4,391 
4,176 
2,964 
6, 530 


4,109 
2,573 
10,017 
7,339 
3,777 
4,120 
6,603 
4,309 
4,253 
2,767 
6,903 


3,325 

1,286 
8,902 
9, 142 
6, 557 
5,140 
6,339 
2, 510 
5,579 
2,087 
5,174 


1,602 
608 
4,413 
4,455 
3, 250 
2, 561 
3, 102 
1,281 
2, 754 
1,093 
2,500 


1,723 
678 
4,489 
4,687 
3,307 
2, 579 
3, 237 
1,229 
2,825 
994 
2,674 


36 

59 

163 

116 

32 

27 

138 

25 

53 

59 

56 


32 

43 

136 

104 

30 

24 

115 

23 

60 

• 50 

46 


4 

16 

27 

12 

2 

3 

23 

2 

3 

9 

10 


a 




4 




5 




6 




7 
8 


Guayama 


q 




in 




n 


San Lorenzo 

The depart- 
ment 


12 


111, 986 


55,216 


56, 770 


56,041 


27, 619 


28,422 


764 


653 


111 



DEPARTMENT 



1 




16, 782 

14,313 

6, 221 

10, 873 

11,163 

8,602 

6,642 

13, 905 


8,129 
7,099 
3, 106 
5,388 
5,589 
4,283 
3,407 
6, 983 


8,653 
7,214 
3,115 
5,485 
5, 574 
4,319 
3,235 
6,922 


9,880 
5,964 
1,717 
6, 585 
5,334 
3,881 
2,545 
4,340 


4,793 
2,924 
867 
3, 220 
2,692 
1,954 
1,252 
2,144 


5,087 
3,040 
850 
3, 365 
2,642 
1,927 
1,293 
2,196 


108 
146 
20 
45 
33 
23 
138 
46 


83 
v 125 
19 
36 
29 
22 
96 
39 


25 
21 
1 
9 
4 
1 
42 
7 


2 
3 
4 
5 


Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 


6 




7 




8 


Yabucoa 

The depart- 
ment 


9 


88, 501 


43, 984 


44,517 


40, 246 


19, 846 


20, 400 


559 


449 


110 



DEPARTMENT 



Aflasco 

CaboRojo 

Hormigueros . . . 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

' City of Maya- 
guez 

Sabana Grande. 
San German 



The depart- 



13, 311 


6,551 


16, 154 


8,015 


3,215 


1,602 


8,789 


4,382 


11,279 


5,692 


8,312 


4,220 


35, 700 


17, 049 


15, 187 


6,765 


10, 560 


5,291 


20, 246 


9,948 


127, 566 


62, 750 



6,760 


10, 499 


8,139 


12, 864 


1,613 


1,894 


4,407 


6,709 


5,587 


8,771 


4,092 


5,744 


18, 651 


22, 176 


8,m 


8,3314. 


5,269 


3,036 


10,298 


8,871 


64,816 


80, 564 



5,172 
6,348 
969 
3,348 
4,388 
2,898 
10,719 

3,773 
1,509 
4,274 



5,327 


56 


48 


6, 516 


58 


45 


925 


23 


19 


3,361 


33 


29 


4,383 


106 


86 


2,846 


162 


127 


11, 457 


897 


635 


k,561 


75k 


521 


1,527 


32 


28 


4,597 


113 


82 


40, 939 


1,480 


1,099 



13 

4 

4 

20 

35 

262 



DEPARTMENT 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Peiiuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce. 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The depart- 
ment 



19, 484 


9,872 


8, 596 


4,489 


8,103 


4,013 


14, 845 


7, 527 


15, 144 


7,584 


9, 540 


4, 842 


27, 896 


14,093 


12, 129 


6,152 


55, 477 


27, 587 


27, 952 


IS, 197 


4,858 


2,494 


27, 119 


13, 304 


203, 191 


101, 957 



9,612 


15, 261 


7,584 


4,107 5,780 


2,945 


4,090 : 5,587 


2,781 


7,318 11,131 


5,618 


7,560 


7,216 


3,634 


4,698 


2,985 


1,516 


13, 803 


17, 332 


8,776 


5,977 


7, 022 


3,532 


27,890 


31,253 


15, 575 


Ik, 755 


Ik, 268 


6,76k 


2,364 


1,606 


797 


13, 815 


13, 611 


6,524 


101, 234 


118, 784 


59,282 



7,677 


251 


228 


2,835 


94 


86 


2,806 


15 


14 


5, 513 


38 


29 


3, 582 


67 


49 


1,469 


70 


55 


8,556 


155 


127 


3,490 


55 


46 


15, 678 


1,358 


997 


7,50k 


1,182 


8k7 


809 


32 


27 


7,087 


268 


228 


59, 502 


2,403 


1,886 



23 
8 
1 

9 

1.8 

15 

28 

9 

361 

335 

5 

40 



nativity, and race- 

OF GUAYAMA. 



SEX, NATIVITY, AND RACE. 
-Continued. 



167 



Negro. 


Mixed. 


Chinese. 




Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 




66 

757 

1,116 

749 

577 

163 

1,015 

1,375 

538 

803 

461 


33 
380 
544 
396 
302 

86 
472 
729 
277 
414 
228 


33 
377 
572 
353 
275 

77 
543 
646 
261 
389 
233 


4,550 
2,765 
9,676 
4,430 
386 
2,915 
5,257 
4,790 
2,259 
2,782 
7,742 


2,201 
1,263 
4,747 
2,143 
193 
1,454 
2,457 
2,358 
1,095 
1,407 
3,756 


2, 349 
1,502 
4, 929 
2,'287 
193 
1,461 
2,800 
2, 432 
1,164 
1,375 
3,986 








1 








9 








9 


5 


5 




I 





5 


4 


4 




6 




7 








8 








q 








10 








11 










7,620 


3, S61 


3,759 


47, 552 


23,074 


24,478 


9 


9 




1*> 







OF HUMACAO. 



OF MAYAGUEZ. 



OF PONCE. 



1,594 

1,580 

1,080 

880 

519 

598 

1,036 

1,275 


755 
772 
546 
465 
269 
302 
605 
654 


839 
808 
534 
415 
250 
296 
431 
621 


5,200 
6, 623 
3,404 
3,363 
5,277 
4,100 
2,923 
8,244 


2, 498 
3,278 
1,674 
1,667 
2,599 
2,005 
1,454 
4,146 


2,702 
3,345 
1,730 
1,696 
2,678 
2, 095 
1,469 
4,098 








1 








9 








3 








4 








5 








6 








7 








8 










8,562 


4,368 


4,194 


39, 134 


19, 321 


19,813 








9 











722 
441 
206 
209 
361 
209 
2,687 

1,381 
584 
547 


357 

215 

95 

98 

178 

115 

1,164 

525 
320 
273 


365 
226 
111 
111 
183 
94 
1,523 

866 
264 

274 


2,032 
2,791 
1,092 
1,838 
2,041 
2,197 
9,933 

U,711 

6,908 

10, 715 


972 

1,407 
519 
907 
1,040 
1,080 
4,528 

1,953 
3,434 
5,319 


1,060 
1,384 
573 
931 
1,001 
1,117 
5,405 

t,758 
3,474 
5,396 


9 


9 




1 






o 






S 






4 









5 








6 


7 


3 

3 


4 

U 


7 

8 







m 








5, 966 


2, 815 


3, 151 


39, 547 


19, 206 


20, 341 


9 


5 


4 


11 



42 

300 

436 

371 

561 

245 

2, 113 

284 

4,485 

2,55h 

547 

440 


27 

170 

198 

194 

290 

131 

1,085 

147 

2,019 

l,0h0 

281 

205 


15 
130 

238 

177 

271 

114 

1,028 

137 

2,466 

l,51h 

266 

235 


3,930 

2,422 
2,065 
3,303 
7,300 
6,240 
8,296 
4,768 

18, 374 
9,942 
2,673 

12, 795 


2,033 

1,288 
1,020 
1,684 
3,611 
3,140 
4,105 
2, 427 
8,990 
U,5U0 
1,389 
6,344 


1,897 
1,134 
1,045 
1,619 
3,689 
3,100 
4,191 
2,341 
9,384 
5, 402 
1,284 
6,451 








1 








9 








^ 


2 


2 




4 




5 








6 








7 








8 


7 
6 


6 

6 


1 


9 

in 






11 


5 


3 


2 


12 


9,824 


4,747 


5,077 


72, 166 


36, 031 


36, 135 


14 


11 


3 


13 



168 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table VI. — Percentages by sex. 
PORTO RICO. 



Department, 


Total population. 


Native white. 


Foreign white. 


Colored. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 




49.4 
49.8 
48.9 
49.3 
49.7 
49.2 
50.2 


50.6 
50.2 
51.1 
50.7 
50.3 
50.8 
49.8 


49.4 
49.6 
48.4 
49.3 
49.3 
49.2 
49.9 


50.6 
50.4 
51.6 

50.7 
50.7 
50.8 
50.1 


79.9 
76.9 
77.1 
85.5 
80.3 
74.3 
78.5 


20.1 
23.1 
22.9 
14.5 
19.7 
25.7 
21.5 


47.8 
49.7 
47.9 
48.8 
49.7 
48.4 
49.7 


52.2 




50.3 


Bayamon 


52.1 
51.2 


Humacao 


50.3 
51.6 




50.3 






Total 


49.5 


50.5 


49.4 


50.6 


77.9 


22.1 


48.9 


51.1 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



District, 


Total population. 


Native white. 


Foreign white. 


Colored. 


Males. 


Females 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 




49.4 
48.1 
48.0 
50.2 
50.3 
50.4 
50.0 


50.6 
51.9 
52.0 
49.8 
49.7 
49.6 
50.0 


49.6 
48.2 
48.1 
49.9 
50.7 
50.1 
49.7 


50.4 
51.8 
51.9 
50.1 
49.3 
49.9 
50.3 


78.0 
81.7 
65.9 
83.4 
70.6 
94.1 
76.8 


22.0 
18.3 
34.1 
16.6 
29.4 
5.9 
23. 2 


47.7 
46.1 
46.3 
48.3 
47.5 
51.3 
51.2 


52.3 


Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 


53.9 
53.7 
51.7 
52.5 




48.7 


San Sebastian 


48.8 


Total 


49.4 


50.6 


49.4 


60.6 


79.9 


20.1 


47.8 


52.2 







DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 





49.9 
50.5 
48.4 
50.1 
51.7 
49.1 
50.2 
48.2 
50.5 


50.1 
49.5 
51.6 
49.9 
48.3 
50.9 
49.8 
51.8 
49.5 


49.8 
49.8 
48.5 
49.2 
49.0 
48.7 
49.8 
48.1 
50.3 


50.2 
50.2 
51 5 
50.8 
51.0 
51.3 
50.2 
51.9 
49.7 


77.5 
74.2 
58.4 
88.5 
61.0 
80.0 
89.7 
53.6 
88.3 


22.5 
25.8 
41.6 
11.5 
39.0 
20.0 
10.3 
46.4 
11.7 


48.9 
51.0 
46.3 
51.7 
50.9 
48.8 
51.1 
47.8 
50.0 


51.1 


Barceloneta 


49.0 
53.7 


Ciales 

Hatillo 


4S.3 
49.1 




51.2 


Morovis 

Quebradillas 


48.9 
52.2 
50.0 






Total 


49.8 


50.2 


49.6 


50.4 


76.9 


23.1 


49.7 


50 3 







DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 





48.8 
49.4 
48.4 
49.5 
50.2 
49.7 
49.4 
48.6 
47.1 
50.1 
50.6 
49.6 
49.3 
49.4 


51.2 
50.6 
51.6 
50.5 
49.8 
50.3 
50.6 
51.4 
52.9 
49.9 
49.4 
50.4 
50.7 
50.6 


48.4 
50.5 
48.5 
49.1 
51.0 
49.9 
48.7 
47.8 
44.7 
49.1 
48.8 
50.3 
49.1 
48.3 


51.6 
49.5 
51.5 
50.9 
49.0 
50.1 
51.3 
52.2 
55.3 
50.9 
51.2 
49.7 
50.9 
51.7 


72.4 
84.0 
85.7 
63.4 
87.7 
83.3 
84.5 
82.2 
76.3 
89.7 
78.7 
77.1 
84.2 
79.0 


27.6 
16.0 
14.3 
36.6 
12.3 
16.7 
15.5 
18.8 
23.7 
10.3 
21.3 
22.9 
15.8 
21.0 


48.3 

48.3 
47.8 
49.4 
49.3 
48.4 
49.6 
48.1 
43.9 
51.4 
50.7 
48.5 
49.3 
50.4 


51 7 




51 7 




52.2 




50.6 




50 7 




51.6 




50.4 




51 9 




56.1 


Toa Alta 


48.6 




49 3 


TrujilloAlto 


51.5 
50.7 




49.6 






Total 


48.9 


51.1 


48.4 


51.6 


77.1 


22.9 


47.9 


52.1 







SEX, NATIVITY, AND RACE. 



169 



Table VI. — Percentages by sex — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OP GUAYAMA. 



District. 


Total population. 


Native white. 


Foreign white. 


Colored. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 


AguasBuenas 


48.5 
47.1 
49.6 
49.2 
50.0 
50.1 
48.2 
50.5 
49.5 
51.7 
48.6 


51.5 
52.9 
50.4 
50.8 
50.0 
49.9 
51.8 
49.5 
50.5 
48.3 
51.4 


48.2 
47.3 
49.6 
48.7 
49.6 
49.8 
48.9 
51.0 
49.4 
52.4 
48.3 


51.8 
52.7 
50.4 
51.3 
50.4 
50.2 
51.1 
49.0 
50.6 
47.6 
51.7 


88.9 
72.9 
83.4 
89.7 
93.7 
88.9 
83.3 
92.0 
94.3 
84.7 
82.1 


11.1 

27.1 
16.6 
10.3 
6.3 
11.1 
16.7 
8.0 
5.7 
15.3 
17.9 


48.4 
46.7 
49.0 
49.1 
51.4 
50.1 
46.7 
50.1 
49.1 
50.8 
48.6 


51.6 
53.3 




51.0 


Cayey 


50.9 

48.6 




49.9 




53.3 




49.9 




50.9 




49.2 


San Lorenzo 


51.4 


Total 


49.3 


50.7 


49.3 


50.7 


85.5 


14.5 


48.8 


51.2 







DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 





48.4 
49.6 
49.9 
49.6 
50.1 
49.8 
51.3 
50.2 


51.6 
50.4 
50.1 
50.4 
49.9 
50.2 
48.7 
49.8 


48.5 
49.0 
50.5 
48.9 
50.5 
50.3 
49.2 
49.4 


51.5 
51.0 
49.5 
51.1 
49.5 
49.7 
50.8 
50.6 


76.9 
85.6 
95.0 
80.0 
87.9 
- 95.7 
69.6 
84.8 


23.1 
14.4 

5.0 
20.0 
12.1 

4.3 
30.4 
15.2 


47.9 
49.4 
49.5 
50.2 
49.5 
49.1 
52.0 
50.4 


52.1 




50.6 




50.5 




49.8 


Patillas 


50.5 




50.9 




48 




49.6 






Total 


49.7 


50.3 


49.3 


50.7 


80.3 


19.7 


49.7 


50 3 







DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 





49.2 
49.6 
49.8 
49.9 
50.5 
50.8 
47.8 
50.1 
49.1 


50.8 
50.4 
50.2 
50.1 
49.5 
49.2 
52.2 
49.9 
50.9 


49.3 
49.3 
51.2 
49.9 
50.0 
50.5 
48.3 
49.7 
48.2 


50.7 
50.7 
48.8 
50.1 
50.0 
49.5 
51.7 
50.3 
51.8 


85.7 
77.6 
82.6 
87.9 
81.1 
78.4 
70.8 
87.5 
72.6 


14.3 
22.4 
17.4 
12.1 
18.9 
21.6 
29.2 
12.5 
27.4 


48.3 
60.2 
47.3 
49.1 
50.7 
49.7 
45.1 
50.1 
49.7 


51 7 




49 8 


Hormigueros 


52.7 
50 9 




49 3 


Maricao 

Mayaguez 

Sabana Grande 
San German 


50.3 
54.9 
49.9 
50.3 


Total 


49.2 


50.8 


49.2 


50.8 


74.3 


25.7 


48.4 


51 6 







DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 





50.7 
52.2 
49.5 
50.7 
50.1 
50.7 
50.5 
50.7 
49.7 
U7.2 
51.3 
49.1 


49.3 

47.8 
50.5 
49.3 
49.9 
49.3 
49.5 
49.3 
60.3 
52.8 
48.7 
50.9 


49.7 
51.0 
49.8 
50.5 
50.4 
50.8 
50.6 
50.3 
49.8 
U7.h 
49.6 
47.9 


50.3 
49.0 
50.2 
49.5 
49.6 
49.2 
49.4 
49.7 
50.2 
52.6 
50.4 
52.1 


90.8 
91.5 
93.3 
76.3 
73.1 
78.6 
81.9 
83.6 
73.4 
71.7 
84.4 
85.1 


9.2 
8,5 
6.7 
23.7 
26.9 
21.4 
18.1 
16.4 
26.6 
28.3 
15.6 
14.9 


51.9 
53.6 
48.7 
51.1 
49.6 
50.4 
49.9 
51.0 
48.2 
hk.7 
61.9 
49.5 


48 1 




46 4 


Barranquitas 


51.3 
48 9 




50 4 




49 6 




50 1 


Penuelas 


49.0 
51 8 


Oily of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 


55.3 
48.1 
50 5 






Total 


50.2 


49..8 


49.9 


50.1 


78.5 


21.5 


49.7 









170 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table VII. — Percentages by nativity and race. 
PORTO RICO. 



Department. 


Native 
white. 


Foreign 
white. 


Colored. 




84.9 
76.2 
46.4 
50.0 
45.5 
63.2 
58.4 


0.7 
0.9 
2.5 
0.7 
0.6 
1.1 
1.2 


14.4 




22.9 




51.1 




49.3 




53.9 




35.7 




40.4 






Total 


60.6 


1.2 


38.2 







DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



District. 


Native 
white. 


Foreign 
white. 


Colored. 




83.6 
75.3 

86.6 
87.4 
88.2 
85.0 
88.7 


0.4 
1.2 
0.5 
1.3 
0.1 
0.2 
0.5 


16.0 




23.5 




12.9 




11.3 




11.7 




14.8 




10.8 







DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



Arecibo 

Barceloneta . 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 
Utuado 



69.0 


1.1 


56.2 


0.7 


89.5 


1.4 


77.0 


0.8 


82.2 


1.3 


56.9 


1.0 


81.4 


0.3 


89.0 


0.7 


84.0 


0.7 



29.9 
43.1 
9.1 
22.2 
16.5 
42.1 
18.3 
10.3 
15.3 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Ba yamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito ... 
Rio Grande.. 
RioPiedras.. 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 
Vega Alta . . , 
Vega Baja... 



49.5 


1.6 


38.3 


0.8 


63.3 


0.5 


26.8 


1.1 


43.8 


0.5 


77.9 


0.3 


39.6 


0.6 


36.3 


1.7 


3,", 7 


8.9 


63.1 


0.3 


22.6 


1.2 


51.0 


0.6 


41.4 


0.3 


58.7 


1.0 



48.9 
61.9 
36.2 
72.1 
55.7 
21.8 
59.8 
62.0 
52.4 
36.6 
76.2 
48.4 
58.3 
40.3 



NATIVITY AND RACE. 



171 



Table VII. — Percentages by nativity and race — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OP GUAYAMA. 



District. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo.. 



Native 
white. 



41.7 
26.4 
48.4 
63.3 
86.8 
62.3 
49.7 
28.8 
66.2 
36.4 
38.5 



Foreign 
white. 



0.4 
1.2 
0.8 
0.8 
0.4 
0.3 
1.1 
0.3 
0.6 
1.0 
0.4 



Colored. 



57.9 
72.4 
54.4 
35.9 
12.8 
37.4 
49.2 
70.9 
33.2 
62.6 
61.1 



DEPARTMENT OP HUMAi'An. 



Fajardo . 
Humacao 
Maunabo 
Naguabo 
Patillas.. 
Piedras. . 
Vieques . 
Yabucoa. 



58.9 


0.6 


41.7 


1.0 


27.6 


0.3 


60.6 


0.4 


47.8 


0.2 


45.1 


0.3 


38.3 


2.1 


31.2 


0.3 



40.5 
57.3 
72.1 
39.0 
52.0 
54.6 
59.6 
68.5 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Anasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros . . 
Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

Sabana Grande 
San German . . . 



78.9 


0.4 


79.6 


0.4 


58.9 


0.7 


76.3 


0.4 


77.8 


0.9 


69.1 


2.0 


62.1 


2.5 


28.7 


0.3 


43.8 


0.6 



20.7 
20.0 
40.4 
23.3 
21.3 
28.9 
35.4 
71.0 
55.6 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juaiia Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 



78.3 


1.3 


67.2 


1.1 


68.9 


0.2 


75.0 


0.2 


47.7 


0.4 


31.3 


0.7 


62.1 


0.6 


57.9 


0.4 


56.3 


2.5 


51.0 


h.9, 


33.1 


0.6 


50.2 


1.0 



20.4 
31.7 
30.9 
24.8 
51.9 
68.0 
37.3 
41.7 
41.2 
hh.8 
66.3 
48.8 



172 



EEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table YIII. — Age and sej 
PORTO Rico. 



Department. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayanion 

Guayaraa 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



Total 
popu- 
lation. 



99, 645 
162, 308 
160, 046 
111, 

88, 501 
127, 566 
203, 191 



Under 5 years. 



953,243 



Age and sex. 



Males. 



76, 774 



Fe- 
males. 



7,851 
12, 606 
12, 586 
9,189 
7,131 
9,167 
15,099 



73. 6211 



5 to 17 years. 



Males. 



17,049 
28, 360 

27,048 
19, 537 
15,419 
2lt,92.s 
34, 497 



162. 838 



Fe- 
males. 



16, 717 
28, 028 

2(1, 655 
19,000 
14,619 
20, 760 
33, 776 



159, 555 



18 to 20 years. 



Males. 



3, 155 
5,375 
5,239 
3, 596 
2,774 
4,374 
7,065 



31, 578 



Fe- 
males. 



3,800 
6,384 
5, 904 
4,398 
3,245 
5,171 
7,914 



36, 816 



21 to 44 years. 



Males. 



Fe- 
males. 



15,909 

25, 026 

26, 523 
17, 740 
13, 907 
21, 199 
32, 752 



153, 656 



45 years and 
over. 



Males. 



5,970 
8,818 
9,112 
6,316 
5,676 
7,885 
11,831 



55, 608 



Fe- 
males. 



6,144 
8, 763 

10,149 
6,443 
5,615 
8, 519 

11,693 



57, 326 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 





Total 
popu- 
lation. 


Age and sex. 


District. 


Under5 years. 


5 to 17 years. 


18 to 20 years. 


21 to 44 years. 


45 years and 
over. 




Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 




10, 581 
17, 830 
14, 888 
20, 883 
12, 410 
6,641 
16, 412 


941 
1,403 
1,262 
1,712 
1,024 

644 
1,334 


873 
1,395 
1,194 
1,617 
949 
558 
1,265 


1,749 
2,873 
2,440 
3,566 
2,299 
1,219 
2,903 


1,778 
2,900 
2,502 
3, 501 
2,143 
1,118 
2,775 


348 
552 
418 
654 
396 
209 
578 


354 
677 
525 
852 
466 
226 
700 


1,515 
2,619 
2,062 
3,414 
1,806 
888 
2,426 


1,665 
3,034 
2, 525 
3, 305 

1,855 

984 

2, 541 


675 
1,133 
964 
1,137 
719 
384 
958 


683 




1,244 




996 




1, 125 




753 




411 


San Sebastian 


932 


The department. 


99, 645 


8, 320 


7,851 


17, 049 


16, 717 


3,155 


3,800 


14, 730 


15, 909 


5, 970 


6,144 



DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 





36, 910 
9,357 
10, 887 
18, 115 
10,449 
13, 989 
11, 309 
7,432 
43, 860 


2,755 
773 
869 

1,534 
910 

1,053 

1,009 
618 

3,686 


2,664 
755 
818 

1,538 
861 
986 
991 
609 

3,384 


6,149 
1,601 
1,863 
3,308 
1,818 
2, 439 
2,114 
1,224 
7,844 


6,058 
1,562 
1,924 
3,280 
1,875 
2,405 
1,981 
1,257 
7,686 


1,321 
300 
322 
602 
327 
459 
390 
221 

1,433 


1,475 
330 
442 
686 
377 
549 
449 
311 

1,765 


5,993 

1,522 
1,559 
2,778 
1,523 
2,105 
1,570 
1,079 
7, 012 


5,984 
1,469 
1,757 
2, 723 
1,605 
2,312 
1,637 
1,218 
6,921 


2,185 
528 
658 
852 
586 
808 
589 
437 

2,175 


2,326 




517 




675 




814 


Hatillo 


567 




873 
579 


Quebradillas 


458 
1,954 








The department. 


162,308 13,207 

1 


12, 606 


28, 360 


28, 028 


5,375 


6,384 


25,141 25,626 


8,818 


8,763 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 


19, 940 

11, 965 

11, 508 

3,804 

12, 522 

8,101 

12, 365 

13, 760 

32, 048 

7,908 

4,030 

6,683 

6,107 

10, 305 


1,614 

1,031 

1,014 

300 

1,160 

662 

1,094 

1,185 

1,649 

760 

325 

595 

544 

853 


1,579 

1,026 

1,037 

310 

1,150 

623 

1,129 

1,169 

1,724 

708 

291 

576 

474 

790 


3,327 
2, 153 
2,178 

685 
2,225 
1, 535 
2,263 
2,287 
4,248 
1,458 

757 
1,053 
1,051 
1,828 


3,253 

2, 031 

2,208 

613 

2,088 

1,465 

2,214 

2,218 

4,638 

1,365 

676 

956 

1,077 

1,853 


624 
368 
356 
106 
390 
295 
383 
420 
1,311 
218 
129 
151 
167 
321 


760 
448 
449 
98 
408 
317 
389 
490 
1,408 
262 
125 
185 
241 
324 


2,980 

1, 623 

1,461 

548 

1,765 

1,101 

1,660 

1,929 

6,239 

1,119 

563 

739 

857 

1,460 


3,341 

1,802 

1,680 

615 

1,881 

1,260 

1,884 

2,218 

6, 608 

1,211 

632 

860 

932 

1,599 


1,177 
740 
565 
243 
747 
433 
710 
867 

1,653 
408 
264 
283 
392 
630 


1,285 
743 
560 




286 




708 




410 




639 




977 




2,570 


ToaAlta 


399 




268 


Trujillo Alto 


285 
372 


Vega Baja 


647 


The department. 


160, 046 


12, 786 


12, 586 


27,048 


26, 655 


5, 239 


6,904 


24,044 


26, 523 


9,112 


10, 149 



AGE AND SEX. 



173 



Table VIII. — Age and sex — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



Total 
popu- 
lation. 



Aguas Buenas 7, 977 

Arroyo I 4, 867 

Caguas ' 19, 857 

Cayey ' 14,442 

Cidra ; 7,552 

Cornerio 8,249 

Guayama 12,749 

Gurabo I 8, 700 



Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo. 



8,429 
5,731 
13, 433 



The department. 1111, 986 



Age and sex. 



Under 5 years, 



Males - males. 



753 

349 

1,673 

1,098 

621 

698 

932 

819 

786 

476 

1,280 



9,485 



326 

1,608 

1,134 

608 

725 

948 

832 

698 

418 

1,204 



5 to 17 years. 



Males - nfales 



1,398 
802 
3,489 
2,445 
1,346 
1, 559 
2, 122 
1,564 
1,396 
1,022 
2,394 



9,189 19,537 19,000 



1,415 
797 
3, 256 
2, 396 
1,257 
1,432 
2,125 
1,454 
1,429 
1,009 
2,430 



18 to 20 years. 



Males - males. 



226 
169 
664 
455 
237 
267 
396 
256 
289 
208 
429 



307 
205 
830 
568 
300 
337 
504 
314 
307 
205 
521 



21 to 44 years. 



Males " ma'es. 



4,398 16,282 



i. Males - males. 



1,254 
847 
3,098 
2,384 
1,194 
1,201 
2, 208 
1,293 
1,364 
880 
2,017 



17, 740 



45 years and 
over. 



380 
328 
1,159 
810 
431 
413 
789 
448 
490 
374 
694 



6,316 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department. 



16,782 


1,411 


1,369 


3,001 


2,913 


448 


583 


2,220 


2,658 


1,049 


14,313 


1,198 


1,066 


2, 365 


2,269 


486 


582 


2,154 


2,338 


896 


6,221 


514 


495 


1,082 


1,039 


185 


207 


906 


953 


419 


10,873 


898 


876 


2, 062 


1,944 


318 


390 


1,404 


1,633 


706 


11,163 


951 


881 


1,973 


1,875 


373 


436 


1,579 


1,727 


713 


8,602 


791 


785 


1,554 


1,384 


255 


346 


1, 120 


1,256 


563 


6, 642 


496 


528 


1,052 


1,014 


218 


199 


1,133 


1,090 


508 


13,905 


1,197 


1,131 


2,330 


2,181 


491 


502 


2,143 


2,252 


822 


88, 501 


7,456 


7,131 


15, 419 


14, 619 


2,774 


3,245 


12, 659 


13, 907 


5,676 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Anasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayagut v 

Sabana Grande 

San German 

The department. 



13,311 


1,035 


1,054 


2,241 


2,220 


418 


498 


2,056 


2,169 


801 


16,154 


1,322 


1,238 


2,759 


2,667 


543 


625 


2,366 


2,556 


1,025 


3,215 


243 


250 


523 


498 


107 


107 


483 


474 


246 


8,789 


727 


703 


1,499 


1,514 


294 


360 


1, 256 


1,286 


606 


11,279 


916 


886 


1,933 


1,886 


390 


460 


1,800 


1,740 


653 


8,312 


646 


636 


1,398 


1,321 


314 


360 


1,437 


1,405 


425 


35, 700 


2,356 


2,225 


5,386 


5,611 


1,228 


1,526 


5, 982 


6,641 


2,097 


15, 187 


770 


780 


2,071 


2,331 


5h2 


737 


2,590 


3, 250 


792 


10, 560 


876 


769 


1,856 


1,836 


358 


406 


1,569 


1,627 


632 


20, 246 


1,437 


1,406 


3,333 


3,207 


722 


829 


3,056 


3,301 


1,400 


127, 566 


9,558 


9,167 


20, 928 


20, 760 


4,374 


5,171 


20, 005 


21, 199 


7,885 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Adjuntas 19, 484 

Aibonito 8, 596 

Barranquitas 8, 103 

Barros 14, 845 

Coamo 15,144 

Guayanilla 9, 540 

Juaria Diaz 27, 896 

Peiiuelas ! 12, 129 

Ponce I 55, 477 

City of Ponce 27,952 

Santa Isabel 4, 858 

Yauco 27, 119 



The department. 



203, 191 



1,542 

662 

723 

1,376 

1,426 

821 

2, 331 

1,090 

3,591 

1,519 

405 

1,995 



15, 902 



1,467 
652 
699 

1,276 

1,223 
712 

2,185 
932 

3,550 

1,U35 
366 

2, 037 



15, 099 



3,559 
1,569 
1,424 
2, 745 
2,687 
1, 650 
4,870 
2,189 
8,419 
3, 82h 
836 
4,549 



34, 497 



3, 352 
1,488 
1,426 
2,640 
2,720 
1,614 
4,697 
2,091 
8,255 
U,080 
804 
4,689 



33, 776 



611 
392 
267 
513 
517 
310 
999 
423 
1,964 
996 
155 
914 



7,065 



764 
331 

289 
585 
548 
337 

1,004 
452 

2,275 

1,300 
179 

1, 150 



7,914 



3,211 
1,423 
1,116 
2,125 
2,140 
1,403 
4,221 
1,708 
10, 250 
5,Sk9 
783 
4,222 



32, 602 



3,076 
1,224 
1,217 
2,115 
2,286 
1,442 
4,316 
1,790 
10, 146 
5,835 
771 
4,369 



:;2.752 



949 
443 
483 
768 
814 
658 

1,672 
742 

3,363 

1,509 
315 

1,624 



11,831 



174 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



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AGE, RACE, NATIVITY, AND SEX. 



175 



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176 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 





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AGE, EACE, NATIVITY, AND SEX. 



177 



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as co i— i <x -p : : x x ovcir- x x co x os o io no -r rH o co ^f cn 

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AGE, EACE, NATIVITY, AND SEX. 



183 






'fCOOHC)C5Ti<|^CO'J5'*'MHiO<OCOCOHCCcOI>td i^h 



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184 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



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NATIVITY. 



185 



Table X. — Nativity. 
PORTO RICO. 



Department. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayanion 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



Total 
population. 



99, 645 
162,308 
160, 046 
111,986 

88, 501 
127, 566 
203, 191 



953, 243 



Porto 
Rico. 



98, 867 
160, 765 
155, 306 
111,082 

87, 263 
125, 887 
200, 201 



939, 371 



Spain. 



522 

1,254 

2, 700 

575 

348 

946 

1,345 



Other 
coun- 
tries. 



7,690 



256 
289 

2,039 
329 
889 
733 

1,642 



Unknown. 



6,177 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



District. 



Total Porto 

population. Rico. 



Spain. 



Other 
coun- 
tries. 



Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 

Moca 

Rincon 

San Sebastian 

The department 



10, 581 
17, 830 
14, 888 
20, 883 
12, 410 
6,641 
16, 412 



10, 536 
17, 585 
14, 802 
20, 600 
12, 390 
6,624 
16, 330 



35 
127 
72 
187 
16 
10 
75 



99,645 [ 98,867 



522 



10 

118 

14 

96 

4 

7 



DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



Arecibo 

Barceloneta 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 

Utuado 

The department 



36, 910 
9,357 
10, 887 
18, 115 
10, 449 
13, 989 
11, 309 
7,432 
43, 860 



162, 308 



36, 454 
9, 289 
10, 731 
17, 965 
10, 315 
13, 830 
11,270 
7,373 
43, 538 



160, 765 



325 

60 

140 

141 

127 

120 

33 

53 

255 



1,254 



131 

8 
16 
9 
7 

39 
6 
6 
67 



289 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



19, 940 

11,965 

11,508 

3,804 

12, 522 

8,101 

12, 365 

13, 760 

32, 048 

7,908 

4,030 

5,683 

6,107 

10, 305 



160, 046 



19, 557 

11,830 

11,451 

3,747 

12, 454 

8,070 

12, 288 

13, 504 

28, 622 

7,876 

3,982 

5,648 

6,082 

10, 195 



155, 306 



239 

86 
52 
38 
50 
28 
56 
181 
1,780 
22 
34 
28 
14 
92 



144 
49 

5 
19 
18 

3 
21 
75 
1,645 
10 
14 

7 
11 
18 



2, 700 



2, 039 



DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



Aguas. Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

.luncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



7,977 
4,867 

19, 857 

14,442 
7,552 
8,249 

12, 749 
8,700 
8,429 
5,731 

13, 433 



111,986 



7,941 
4,778 

19, 681 

14, 300 
7,519 
8, 222 

12, 584 
8,672 
8,376 
5,636 

13, 373 



111,082 



33 
29 
128 
86 
31 
26 
93 
23 
50 
26 
50 



575 



1 86 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table X. — Nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



District. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department 



Total 
population, 



16, 782 
14, 313 
6,221 
10, 873 
11,163 
8,602 
6,642 
13,905 



88, 501 



Porto 
Rico. 



16,616 
14,143 
6,187 
10, 794 
11,119 
8,577 
5,986 
13, 841 



87, 263 



Spain. 



66 
104 
12 
31 
18 
22 
53 
42 



Other 
coun- 
tries. 



100 
65 
22 
48 
26 
3 

603 
22 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Afiasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez. .. 

Sabana Grande 

San German 

The department 



13,311 
16, 154 
3,215 
8,789 
11,279 
8,312 
35, 700 
IS, 187 
10, 560 
20, 246 



127, 566 



13, 248 

16, 069 

3,190 

8,752 

11,168 

8,150 

34, 658 

U, 298 

10,528 

20, 124 



125, 887 



45 
36 
20 
18 
90 
93 
563 
h6h 
14 
67 



946 



18 

49 

6 

19 

21 

69 

479 

L25 

18 

55 



733 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



19, 484 
8,596 
8,103 
14,845 
15,144 
9,540 
27,896 
12, 129 
55,477 
27, 952 
4,858 
27, 119 



203, 191 



19, 229 

8,495 

8,088 

14, 804 

15, 071 

9,461 

27, 728 

12, 066 

53,605 

.'/;,.:.:.' 

4,813 

26, 841 



200, 201 



178 
52 
15 
22 
38 
33 
84 
23 

771 

647 
17 

112 



1,345 



18 
34 
46 
84 
40 
1,101 

973 
28 

166 



1,642 



NATIVITY BY SEX AND RACE. 
Table XI. — Nativity by sex and race. 

PORTO RICO. 



187 



Sex and race. 


Total. 


Porto 
Rico. 


Other 
West In- 
dies. 


Spanish 
America. 


United 
States. 


Spain. 


Other Other 
Europe.] S. 


Total population 


953, 243 


939, 371 


1,693 


348 


1,069 


7,690 


2,433 639 


Males 

Females 

White 

Males 

Females 

Colored 

Males 

Females 


472, 261 
480, 982 


461,993 

477, 378 


906 

787 


165 
183 


788 
281 


6, 333 
1,357 


1,627 
806 


449 
190 


589, 426 


578, 004 


712 281 


972 7, 638 


1,539 2S0 


294, 195 
295, 231 


285, 299 
292, 705 


349 
363 


136 

145 


701 1 6,290 
271 1,348 


1,184 
355 


236 
44 


363, 817 


361,367 


981 


67 


97 j 52 


894 


359 


178, 066 
185, 751 


176, 694 
184, 673 


557 
424 


29 

38 


87 1 43 
10 9 


443 
451 


213 

146 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



Total 99,645 


98, 867 


64 


33 


12 


522 


70 


77 


Males 49, 224 

Females : 50,421 


48, 609 
50,258 


43 
21 


17 
16 


7 
5 


419 
103 


67 
3 


62 
15 


White ' 85,298 


84,563 


44 


32 


11 


520 1 68 


60 






Males 42, 363 

Females 42,935 


41,776 
42, 787 


24 
20 


16 
16 


6 
5 


417 1 67 
103 | 1 


57 
3 


Colored 14,347 


14,304 


20 


1 


1 


2 


2 


17 


Males 6,861 

Females 7,486 


6,833 
7,471 


19 

1 


1 


1 


2 




5 


2 


12 













DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



Total 


162, 308 


160, 765 


49 


38 


23 


1,254 


121 


58 








80, 901 
81,407 


79, 728 
81,037 


32 
17 


25 
13 


14 
9 


970 

284 


86 
35 


46 


Females 


12 


White 


125, 059 


123, 601 


33 


34 


23 


1,244 


104 


20 


Males 

Females 


62, 375 
62, 684 


61,254 
62, 347 


23 

10 


22 
12 


14 
9 


963 
281 


80 
24 


19 
1 




37, 249 


37,164 


16 


4 




10 


17 


38 










18, 526 
18, 723 


18, 474 
18,690 


9 

7 


3 
1 




7 
3 


6 
11 


27 






11 









DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Total 


160, 046 


155, 306 


563 


105 


680 


2,700 


471 


221 








78, 229 
81, 817 


74,719 
80, 587 


272 
291 


53 

52 


513 
167 


2, 214 
486 


302 
169 


156 


Females 


65 


White 


78, 228 


74, 209 


279 


87 


619 


2,685 


258 


91 






Males 

Females 


38, 998 
39, 230 


35, 900 
38, 309 


128 
151 


44 
43 


459 
160 


2, 202 
483 


191 

67 


74 
17 


Colored 


81, 818 


81,097 


284 


18 


61 


15 


213 


130 


Males 

Females 


39, 231 
42, 587 


38, 819 
42, 278 


144 
140 


9 
9 


54 

7 


12 
3 


111 
102 


82 
48 



188 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XI. — Nativity by sex mid race — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



Sex and race, 


Total. 


Porto 
Rico. 


Other 
West In- 
dies. 


Spanish 
America. 


United 

States. 


Spain. 


Other 
Europe. 


Other 
coun- 
tries. 


Total 


111,986 


111,082 


82 


17 


63 


575 


102 


65 






Males 

Females 


55, 216 
56, 770 


54,465 1 56 
56,617 26 


7 
10 


49 

14 


516 
59 


79 1 44 
23 | 21 


White 


56, 805 


56, 041 


29 


13 


49 


570 


74 


29 






Males 

Females 


28, 272 
28, 533 


27,619 
28,422 


15 
14 


5 

8 


35 
14 


511 
59 


61 
13 


26 
3 


Colored 


55, 181 


55, 041 


53 


4 


14 


5 


28 


36 


Males 


26, 944 
28, 237 


26, 846 
28, 195 


41 
12 


2 

2 


14 


5 


18 
10 


18 

18 











DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



Total 


. . J 88, 501 


87, 263 


562 


13 


19 


348 


235 


. 


Males 


I 43, 984 
44,517 


43, 109 
44,154 


345 
217 


5 

8 


13 
6 


307 
41 


166 
69 


39 
22 








White 


. . . 40, 805 


40, 245 


78 


9 


17 


346 


96 


14 


Males 

Females 


20, 295 
. . . 20, 510 


19, 845 
20,400 


45 
33 


4 
5 


12 
5 


305 
41 


75 
21 


9 
5 


Colored 


47, 696 


47, 018 


484 


4 


2 


2 


139 


47 


Males 


23, 689 
24,007 


23, 264 
23,754 


300 
184 


1 
3 


1 
1 


2 


91 

48 


30 

17 









DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Total 


127, 566 


125, 887 


146 


66 


88 


946 


391 


42 






Males 

Females 


62, 750 
64,816 


61, 579 
64, 308 


57 
89 


26 
40 


55 
33 


771 
175 


239 
152 


23 
19 


White 


82,044 


80, 564 


107 


41 


84 


940 


298 


10 


Males 

Females 


40, 724 
41,320 


39, 625 

40.939 


47 
60 


17 
24 


51 
33 


765 
175 


210 

88 


9 
1 




45, 522 


45, 323 


39 


25 


4 


6 


93 


32 








22, 026 
23, 496 


•J 1.951 
23, 369 


10 
29 


9 

16 


4 


e 


29 
64 


14 




18 











DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Total 


203, 191 


200, 201 


227 


76 


184 


1,345 


1,043 


115 








101, 957 
101,234 


99, 784 
100,417 


101 

126 


32 

44 


137 

47 


1,136 
209 


688 
355 


79 


Females 


36 


White 


121,187 


118, 781 


142 


65 


169 


1,333 


641 


56 








61,168 
60, 019 


59, 280 
59, 501 


67 

75 


28 
37 


124 
45 


1,127 
206 


500 
141 


42 


Females 


14 




82, 004 


81,420 


85 


11 


15 


12 


402 


59 








40, 789 
41, 215 


40, 504 
40, 916 


34 

51 


4 

7 


13 
2 


9 
3 


188 
214 


37 


Females 


22 



NATIVITY BY SEX AND RACE. 



189 



Table XL — Nativity by sex and race — Continued. 
CITY OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Sex and race. 


Total. 


Porto 
Rico. 


Other 

West In- 

eies. 


Spanish 
America. 


United 
States. 


Spain. 


Other 
Europe. 


Other 
coun- 
tries. 


Total 


15,187 


14, 298 


99 


33 


78 


464 


206 


9 








6, 765 
8, 422 


6,205 
8,093 


31 

68 


6 

27 


49 

29 


369 
95 


102 
104 


3 


Females 


6 


White 


9,088 


8,334 


70 


19 


76 | 459 


129 


1 








4,294 
4,794 


3,773 
4,561 


24 
46 


4 
15 


47 
29 


364 
95 


81 
48 


1 












6,099 


5,964 


29 


14 


2 


5 


77 


8 








2, 471 
3,628 


2,432 
3,532 


7 
22 


2 

12 


2 


5 


21 
56 


2 




6 











CITY OF PONCE. 



CITY OF SAN JUAN. 



Total 


27,952 


26, 332 


174 


51 


129 


647 


561 


58 


Males 

Females 


13, 197 

14, 755 


12,160 
14, 172 


70 
104 


22 
29 


91 
38 


514 
133 


304 

257 


36 
22 


White 


15,450 


14, 268 


109 


43 


121 


645 


229 


35 


Males 

Females 


7,611 
7,839 


6,764 
7,504 


46 
63 


20 
23 


85 
36 


513 
132 


160 
69 


23 
12 


Colored 


12,502 


12,064 


65 


8 


8 


2 


332 


23 


Males 

Females 


5, 586 
6,916 


5, 396 
6,668 


24 
41 


2 
6 


6 

2 


1 
1 


144 
188 


13 
10 



Total 


32, 048 


28, 622 


435 


78 


631 


1,780 


350 


152 


Males 

Females 


15,100 
16, 948 


12, 599 
16, 023 


211 

224 


44 
34 


476 
155 


1,439 
341 


225 
125 


106 
46 


White 


15, 263 


12, 390 


205 


63 


572 


1,769 


191 


73 


Males 

Females 


7,731 
7,532 


5,540 
6,850 


95 
110 


37 

26 


424 
148 


1,431 
338 


146 

45 


58 
15 


Colored 


16, 785 


16, 232 


230 


15 


59 


11 


159 


79 


Males 

Females 


7,369 
9,416 


7,059 
9,173 


116 

114 


7 
8 


52 

7 


8 
3 


79 
80 


48 
31 



190 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XII. — Males '£1 years of aye and over, 

SUMMARY BY 





Whites born in Porto Rico. 


Whites born in Spain. 


Department. 


Total. 


Can 

neither 

read 

nor 

write. 


Can 

read 

but can 

not 

write. 


Can 
read 
and 
write. 


With 
supe- 
rior 
educa- 
tion. 


Total. 


Can 
neither 

read 

nor 
write. 


Can 

read 

but can 

not 

write. 


Can 
read 
and 
write. 


With 
supe- 
rior 
educa- 
tion. 


Porto Rico 


120,295 


84,898 


1,305 


31,779 


2,313 


5,662 


644 


37 


4,586 


395 


Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

( riiayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 


IT, 497 
25, 195 
14, 645 
11,508 
8,328 
17,611 
25, 511 


13, 813 
19, 547 
9,440 
7,844 
5,841 
11,432 
16, 981 


158 
238 
221 
123 
80 
174 
311 


3,459 
5,233 
4,487 
3,338 
2,187 
5,307 
7,768 


67 
177 
497 
203 
220 
698 
451 


412 
887 

1,862 
481 
287 
697 

1,036 


64 
191 

148 
26 
14 
79 

122 


1 

8 
17 
4 
1 
1 
5 


331 
658 
1,567 
427 
228 
524 
851 


16 
30 
130 
24 
44 
93 
58 









SUMMARY BY 





Whites born in Porto Rico. 


Whites born in Spain. 


District. 


Total. 


Can 

neither 

read 

nor 

write. 


Can 
read 

but can 
not 

write. 


Can 
read 
and 
write. 


With 
supe- 
rior 
educa- 
tion. 


Total. 


Can 
neither 

read 

nor 
write. 


Can 
read 

:>ut can 
not 

write. 


Can 
read 
and 

write. 


With 
supe- 
rior 
educa- 
tion. 


Aguadilla 


17,497 


13, 813 


158 


3,459 


67 


412 


64 


1 


331 


16 


Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Isabela 


1,863 
2,808 
2,617 
3,867 
2, 264 
1,085 
2,993 


1,666 
1,950 
2, 024 
3,107 
1,863 
933 
2,370 


29 
19 
32 
23 

15 
14 
26 


264 
815 
556 
721 
382 
135 
586 


4 
24 

5 
16 

4 

3 
11 


25 
94 
47 
173 
11 
9 
53 


4 
12 
18 
20 

1 




20 

77 

28 

146 

9 

8 

43 


1 
5 
1 
7 
1 
1 




Rincon 

San Sebastian 


9 


1 




25, 195 


19, 547 


238 


5,233 


177 


887 


191 


8 


• 658 


30 




Arecibo 

Barceloneta . . 
Camuy 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas . 
Utuado 


5,514 
1,139 
1,941 
2, 707 
1,681 
1,626 
1,724 
1,338 
7,525 


4, 021 
797 
1,547 
2, 199 
1,304 
1,255 
1,358 
986 
6,080 


72 
15 
8 
15 
15 
24 
20 
16 
53 


1,346 
323 
364 
484 
357 
321 
339 
330 

1,369 


75 
4 

22 
9 
5 

26 
7 
6 

23 


238 
35 
79 

111 
74 
87 
29 
28 

206 


34 
6 

45 
6 

41 
8 
1 

15 

35 


2 

2 
1 

1 
2 


189 
26 
29 

104 
32 
73 
27 
12 

166 


13 
1 

4 

1 

6 
1 

1 
3 




14, 645 


9,440 


221 


4,487 


497 


1,862 


148 


17 


1,567 


130 




Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 


1,981 
910 

1,283 
218 

1,087 

1,200 
987 

1,014 

2,513 
990 
200 
574 
506 

1,182 


1,419 
652 

1,000 
121 
825 
995 
692 
639 
588 
747 
95 
402 
364 
901 


22 

16 

20 

2 

16 

18 

15 

11 

63 

11 

2 

7 

6 

12 


509 

232 

261 

89 

226 

180 

261 

333 

1,552 

224 

99 

146 

128 

247 


31 

10 
2 
6 

20 
7 

19 

31 

310 

8 

4 

19 
8 

22 


175 
68 
40 
21 
43 
22 
44 

129 
1,177 
17 
30 
22 
12 
62 


19 
5 


2 


146 

59 

39 

12 

33 

19 

38 

110 

998 

14 

29 

20 

7 

43 


10 
2 
1 
2 
5 
2 
2 
10 
88 

2 
2 
4 


7 
5 

4 
9 

77 
3 
1 


1 
14 


Naranjito 

Rio Grande . . . 
Rio Piedras... 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

TrujilloAlto.. 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 


3 

15 






11,508 


7,844 


123 


3,338 


203 


481 


26 


4 


427 


24 




Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cavey 

Cidra 


653 

283 

1,857 

1,899 

1,330 

1,015 

1,347 

527 

1,125 

487 

985 


469 

162 

1,128 

1,225 

1,035 

788 

864 

319 

815 

332 

687 

- 


- 7 
3 

33 

21 

10 

9 

13 

6 

11 

3 

7 


165 
104 
673 
611 
285 
215 
398 
189 
290 
130 
278 


12 

14 
23 
22 

3 
72 
13 

9 
22 
13 


23 

29 
103 
78 
29 
19 
79 
20 
43 
19 
39 


1 

10 

4 
1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 

2 


21 
26 

88 
68 
27 
18 
70 
16 
40 
18 
35 


1 

2 

4 
6 

1 

6 

1 

3 


Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo.. 



CITIZENSHIP OF MALES OVER TWENTY-ONE. 



191 



classified by place of birth, race, and literacy. 
DEPARTMENTS. 



Whites born in other countries. 


Colored. 


Total. 


Can 

neither 

read 

nor 

write. 


Can 

read 

but can 

not 
write. 


Can 
read 
and 
write. 


With 
supe- 
rior 
educa- 
tion. 


Can 

neither 

Total. read 

nor 

write. 


Can 

read 

but can 

not 
write. 


Can 

read 
and 

write. 


With 
supe- 
rior 
educa- 
tion. 


2,104 


158 


11 


1, 519 


416 


73, 010 


60, 434 


1,094 


11, 315 


107 


106 
136 
703 
103 
123 
270 
663 


11 
16 
23 
9 
31 
24 
44 




76 
85 
542 
61 
58 
165 
532 


19 
34 
136 
33 
33 
79 
82 


2,685 
7,741 
15, 946 
10, 506 
9, 597 
9,312 
17, 223 


2,146 
6,762 

12, 643 
9,217 
8,357 
7,344 

13, 965 


36 
103 
412 
113 
104 
108 
218 


498 
870 
2,848 
1,170 
1,125 
1,809 
2,995 


5 


1 
2 


6 

43 
6 


1 
2 
5 


11 

51 
45 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICTS. 



Whites born in other countries. 


Colored. 


Total. 


Can 

neither 

read 

nor 

write. 


Can 

read 

but can 

not 
write. 


Can 
read 
and 
write. 


With 
supe- 
rior 
educa- 
tion. 


Total. 


Can 

neither 

read 

nor- 

write. 


Can 

read 

but can 

not 
write. 


Can 
read 
and 
write. 


With 
supe- 
rior 
educa- 
tion. 


106 


11 




76 


19 


2, 685 


2,146 


36 


498 


5 






5 
55 

5 
31 






5 
40 

1 
22 




297 
795 
357 
480 
250 
171 
335 


248 
567 
302 
407 
200 
157 
265 


1 
21 
3 
2 
3 
1 
5 


48 
204 
51 
71 
46 
13 
65 




1 
4 
4 




14 


3 




1 




5 






1 


7 
3 






7 
1 






2 














136 


16 


1 


85 


34 


7,741 


6,762 


103 


870 


6 


54 
5 
7 
4 
3 

11 
3 
2 

47 


5 
1 
1 


1 


30 
4 
3 
4 
3 
3 
1 
2 

35 


18 


2,372 
871 
190 
808 
351 

1,189 
403 
148 

1,409 


2,031 
763 
161 
750 
320 

1,023 
363 
123 

1,228 


31 
15 
5 
4 
3 
24 


310 
91 
23 
54 
28 

141 
40 
24 

159 




2 




3 


1 














1 
2 




7 


1 










1 
20 




6 




6 


2 






703 


23 


2 


542 


136 


15, 946 


12, 643 


412 


2,848 


43 


31 
4 

4 
2 
3 


2 




20 
3 
4 
2 

2 


9 
1 


1,970 

1,381 

699 

550 

1,379 

312 

1,330 

1,624 

3,593 

517 

594 

426 

728 

843 


1,666 

1,222 

636 

497 

1,176 

288 

1,151 

1,429 

1,771 

476 

489 

396 

663 

783 


34 

29 

9 

4 

36 

1 

17 
25 
218 
4 
21 
2 
8 
4 


266 

129 

53 

48 

166 

23 

161 

169 

1,573 

37 

83 

28 

56 

56 


4 




1 






1 








1 






1 


1 








9 

29 

609 

3 


2 




6 

25 

471 

1 

3 


1 

4 

119 


1 




1 


17 
2 


2 


31 






1 










3 
3 






2 
3 


1 


1 
















103 


9 




61 


33 


10, 506 


9,217 


113 


1,170 


6 






3 

6 

14 

22 

1 


1 




2 
4 
13 
11 




812 

656 

2,040 

1,106 

211 

571 

1,249 

1,203 

535 

724 

l,39i> 


749 
510 

1,824 
942 
195 
528 
987 

1,075 
478 
613 

1,316 


9 
13 

24 
13 


54 
132 
192 
150 

16 

43 
234 
115 

53 
104 

77 






2 
1 
6 


1 








5 
1 




1 
















21 
2 
2 

28 
4 






16 
1 

1 

10 

3 


5 

1 

17 
1 


26 

12 

3 

7 
6 


2 


1 




1 




1 


1 

















192 EEPOET ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XII. — Males 21 years of age and over, 

SUMMARY BY 





Whites born in Porto Rico. 


Whites born in Spain. 


District. 


Total. 


Can 
neither 

read 

nor 
write. 


Can 

read 

but can 

not 
write. 


Can 
read 
and 

write. 


With 
supe- 
rior 
educa- 
tion. 


Total. 


Can 
neither 

read 

nor 
write. 


Can 

read 

but can 

not 

write. 


Can 
read 
and 

write. 


With 
supe- 
rior 
educa- 
tion. 




8,328 


5, 841 


80 


2,187 


220 


287 


14 


1 


228 


44 




Fajardo 

Humacao 


1, 951 

1,236 

404 

1,264 

1,095 

815 

572 

991 


1,361 
729 
261 

1,020 
851 
587 
352 
680 


13 
10 
3 
8 
13 
10 
12 
11 


546 
383 
133 
207 

226 
211 
204 

277 


31 

114 

7 

29 
5 
7 
4 

23 


52 
89 
11 
24 
19 
21 
40 
31 


2 
2 


1 


42 
58 
9 
21 
18 
20 
32 
28 


7 
29 
2 
2 
1 

1 
2 


Naguabo 


1 




Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 


1 

7 
1 






17,611 


11,432 


174 


5,307 


698 


697 


79 


1 


524 


93 




Aflasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros , . 


2,239 
2,670 

454 
1,447 
1,884 
1, 257 
4,932 

725 
2,003 


1,719 
1,766 

317 
1, 025 
1,406 

956 
2, 702 

361 
1,180 


1? 
36 

6 
13 

5 

1 
68 

9 
19 


385 
831 
129 
392 
437 
284 
1,826 
305 
718 


118 
37 
2 
17 
36 
16 

336 
50 
86 


39 
27 
15 
17 
65 
69 
403 
12 
50 


3 
6 
2 
1 
5 
4 
48 
4 
6 


1 


22 
19 
10 
14 
52 
61 
307 
6 
33 


14 
2 
3 
2 
8 
4 

47 
2 

11 


Marias 

Maricao 

Mavaguez , . 
Sabana Grande 
San German . . 


Ponce 


25, 511 


16,981 


311 


7,768 


451 


1,036 


122 


5 


851 | 


Ad juntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquit.is .. 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla . . . 
Juana Diaz ... 
Pefiuelas 


3,090 
1,211 
1, 152 
2,152 
1,517 

711 
3,640 
1,446 
7,322 

390 
2,880 


2,394 

841 

823 

1,648 

928 

412 

2, 696 

1,015 

4,021 

193 

1,980 


20 

9 

17 

39 

14 

10 

33 

9 

115 

16 

29 


659 
356 
304 
431 
533 
244 
858 
379 
3,010 
161 
833 


17 

5 

8 

34 

42 

15 

53 

43 

176 

20 

38 


140 
46 
12 
21 
26 
25 
65 
22 

564 
16 
99 


4 
2 
2 
5 
5 
1 
8 
2 
83 
2 
8 


2 

2 

1 


123 
43 
9 
14 
18 
22 
53 
13 

453- 
14 
89 


13 
1 
1 
2 
3 

4 

7 
26 

1 


Santa Isabel .. 
Yauco 



CITIZENSHIP OF MALES OVER TWENTY-ONE. 



193 



Classified by place of birth, race, and literacy — Continued. 
MUNICIPAL DISTRICTS— Continued. 



Whites born in other countries. 


Colored. 


Total. 


Can 
neither 

read 

nor 
write. 


Can 

read 

but can 

not 
write. 


Can 
read 
and 
write. 


With 

supe- 
rior 
educa- 
tion. 


Total. 


Can 
neither 

read 

nor 
write. 


Can 

read 

but can 

not 
write. 


Can 
read 
and 
write. 


With 
supe- 
rior 
educa- 
tion. 


123 


31 


1 


58 


33 


9,597 


8,357 


104 


1,125 


11 


23 
22 

7 
11 

9 

1 
47 

3 


6 
3 

1 
3 

1 




11 
4 
5 
6 

7 

1 

23 

1 


6 
15 
1 
1 

1 


1,243 

1,703 
903 
811 

1,169 
846 
982 

1,940 


1,058 

1,436 
841 
745 

1,064 
770 
717 

1,726 


16 

18 

5 

4 

12 

4 

32 

13 


168 
247 
67 
60 
93 
72 
229 
199 


1 




2 






1 


2 






17 




7 
2 


4 




2 








270 


24 


2 


165 


79 


9,312 


7,344 


108 


1,809 


51 


7 
13 

2 
11 
13 
38 
145 
14 
27 






2 

10 

2 

8 

7 

35 

81 

5 

15 


5 
2 


572 

681 

258 

387 

491 

498 

2,599 

1,450 

2,376 


465 

560 

212 

348 

415 

436 

1,647 

1,234 

2,027 


9 

5 
2 
1 
1 


92 
116 

43 

38 

75 

61 

855 

208 

321 


6 


1 








1 


1 

1 

1 

19 




2 
5 
2 

43 
9 

11 










1 


2 


62 

2 
26 


35 
6 


1 




2 






663 


44 


5 


532 


82 


17, 223 


13, 965 


218 


2,995 


45 


64 
32 


3 
2 




59 

27 


2 
2 


866 

577 

435 

713 

1,390 

1,298 

2,138 

959 


787 

493 

406 

634 

1,143 

1,132 

1,892 

828 


2 
1 


73 

83 

28 

68 

224 

161 

222 

119 

1,498 

109 

410 


4 


1 




1 


21 
27 
50 
23 

325 
8 

106 






7 

13 
25 
37 
13 
251 
4 




11 
19 

4 
20 

3 

122 

12 

24 




1 

2 

7 

1 

22 




7 


4 




1 




6 
9 
49 
4 
3 


4 




9 


3 


5, 402 3, 761 

684 ! 562 

2, 761 2. 327 


21 
1 


6 


i 


96 











8490—00 13 



194 REPORT ON" THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XIII. — Conjugal condition. 
PORTO RICO. 



Department. 



Total. 



Single. 



Married. 



Living to- 
gether as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 



Widowed. 



Unknown. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



99, 
162, 
160, 
111, 

88, 
127, 
203, 



68, 257 
111, 162 
114, 476 
78, 285 
61, 739 
87, 294 
142, 864 



20, 674 
31,027 
24, 346 
17, 031 
11,962 
22, 573 
30, 957 



5,385 
11,840 
13, 989 
11,608 
10, 908 
10, 428 
20, 0S3 



953, 243 



664, 077 



158,570 



84, 241 



5,286 
8,249 
7, 204 
5,054 
3,825 
7,180 
9,254 



16,052 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



District. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living to- 
gether as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 




10, 581 
17, 830 
14, 888 
20, 883 
12, 410 
6,641 
16, 412 


7,060 
12, 157 
10, 465 
14, 369 
8,391 
4,613 
11,202 


2,418 
3,566 
2,893 
4,067 
2,864 
1,425 
3,441 


474 
1,189 
850 
1,381 
453 
250 
788 


622 
916 
678 
1,051 
702 
353 
964 


7 




2 




2 




15 












17 






The department 


99, 645 


68, 257 


20, 674 


5,385 


5,286 


43 



DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



Arecibo 

Barceloneta 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 

Utuado 

The department 



36, 910 
9,357 
10, 887 
18, 115 
10,449 
13, 989 
11,309 
7,432 
43, 860 



162,30<s 



25, 695 
6,415 
7,575 

12, 412 
7,289 
9,599 
7, 812 
4,962 

29, 403 



111, 162 



5,671 
1,755 
2,412 
3,435 
2,165 
2,407 
2,444 
1,879 
8,859 



3, 729 
737 
324 

1,334 
526 

1,273 
494 
162 

3,261 



31, 027 



11, 840 



1,810 
448 
576 
931 
469 
709 
558 
429 

2,319 



8,249 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



19, 940 

11, 965 

11, 508 

3,804 

12, 522 

8,101 

12, 365 

13, 760 

32, 048 

7,908 

4,030 

5,683 

6,107 

10, 305 



160, 046 



13,912 
8,643 
8,117 
2,672 
9, 050 
5,854 
9,207 
9,675 

22, 847 
5,777 
2,939 
4,128 
4,332 
7,323 



3,091 

1,601 

2, 541 

471 

1,657 

1,577 

1,669 

1,950 

4,594 

1,258 

485 

945 

920 

1,587 



114, 476 



24, 346 



1,945 

1,330 

284 

483 

1,434 

284 

1,072 

1,499 

2,801 

487 

471 

410 

576 

913 



13,989 



983 
385 
566 
178 
380 
375 
416 ! 
635 ; 
1,804 I 
386 I 
135 i 
200 I 
279 I 
482 



7, 204 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 

Table XIII. — Conjugal condition — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



195 



District. 



Single. 



Married. 



Living to- 
gether as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 



Widowed. 



Unknown. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



7,977 
4,867 

19, 857 

14,442 
7,552 
8,249 

12, 749 
8,700 
8,429 
5,731 

13, 433 



5,654 
3,445 
13, 874 
9,918 
5,170 
5,841 
8,709 
6,171 
5,879 
4,025 
9,599 



1,429 
614 
3,096 
2,002 
1,425 
1,341 
1,452 
1,407 
1,172 
720 
2,373 



511 

623 

1,830 

1,816 

518 

720 

2, 125 

770 

984 

860 

851 



111,! 



78, 285 



17,031 



11, ( 



383 
185 
1,053 
706 
437 
346 
463 
352 
393 
126 
610 



5,054 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department 



16, 782 
14,313 
6,221 
10, 873 
11,163 
8, 602 
6,642 
13, 905 



ss, 501 



11, 982 
9,862 
4,301 
7, 756 
7,731 
6,079 
4,539 
9,489 



til. 739 



2, 235 
1,789 

804 
1,769 
1,436 
1,309 

688 
1,932 



11,962 



1,848 

1,964 

834 

841 

1,544 

848 

1,185 

1,844 



10, 908 



716 
673 
281 
487 
451 
366 
230 
621 



3,825 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGTJEZ. 



Afiasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez 

Sabana Grande 

San German 



The department . 



13,311 
16,154 
3, 215 
8,789 
11,279 
8,312 
35, 700 
15, 187 
10, 560 
20, 246 



127, 566 



8,949 
11, 166 
2,155 
6,234 
7,655 
5,631 
24,383 
10, 561 
7,280 
13, 841 



87.294 



2,377 
2,849 
578 
1,630 
1,885 
1,333 
5,393 
2,222 
2,360 
4,168 



22, 573 



1,205 

1,225 

270 

491 

1,213 

949 

3,781 

1,1*10 

373 

921 



10,428 



778 
913 
211 

433 
520 
399 

2,098 
992 
521 

1,307 



7,180 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



19,484 

8,596 

8,103 

14, 845 

15,144 

9,540 

27, 896 

12, 129 

55, 477 

27,952 

4,858 

27, 119 



203, 191 



13,569 
6,158 
5,597 

10, 369 

10, 741 
6,506 

19, 687 
8,535 

39, 725 

19, 9S6 
3,371 

18, 606 



142, 864 



3,535 
1,534 
1,933 
3,154 
2,472 
1,337 
3,288 
1,816 
7,159 
3,918 
665 
4,064 



30, 957 



1,310 
516 
170 

669 
1,325 
1,288 
3,957 
1,269 
5,842 
2,k27 

641 
3,096 



1,061 
383 
402 
652 
601 
409 
961 
509 

2,745 

1,615 
180 

1,351 



20, 083 



9,254 



196 EEPOET ON THE CENSUS OF POETO EICO, 1899. 

Table XIV. — Conjugal condition, by race, sex, and nativity. 



PORTO RICO. 



Race, sex, and nativity. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 




953, 243 


664, 077 


158,570 


84,241 


46,052 


303 








472, 261 
480, 982 


339, 316 
324, 761 


78, 689 
79, 881 


42, 071 
42, 170 


12, 023 
34, 029 


162 




141 








578,009 


396, 654 


110, 208 


40, 593 


30, 355 


199 








285, 303 
292, 706 


204, 090 
192, 564 


53, 089 
57, 119 


20, 250 
20, 343 


7,773 
22, 582 


101 




98 








11,417 


5,119 


4,540 


807 


941 


10 








8,892 
2.525 


4, 115 
1,004 


3, 534 
1,006 


762 
45 


472 
469 


9 




1 








363,817 


262, 304 


43, 822 


42, 841 


14, 756 


94 








178, 066 
185, 751 


131,111 
131, 193 


22, 066 
21, 756 


21, 059 
21, 782 


3,778 
10, 978 


52 




42 







DEPARTMENT OP AGUADILLA. 





99,645 


68, 257 


20, 674 


5,385 


5,286 


43 








49, 224 
50, 421 


34, 799 
33, 458 


10, 295 
10, 379 


2,689 
2,696 


1,415 
3,871 


26 




17 








84, 563 


57, 325 


18, 423 


4,091 


4,682 


42 








41, 776 

42,787 


29,464 
27,861 


9,011 
9,412 


2,038 
2,053 


1,238 
3,444 


25 




17 








735 


295 


343 


38 


59 










587 
148 


248 
47 


272 
71 


34 

4 


33 
26 














14, 347 


10, 637 


1,908 


1,256 


545 


1 








6,861 
7,486 


5,087 
5,550 


1,012 
896 


617 
639 


144 
401 


1 











DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 





162, 308 


111, 162 


31, 027 


11,840 


8,249 


30 








80, 901 
81,407 


57, 446 
53, 716 


15, 335 
15, 692 


5, 922 
5,918 


2, 185 
6,064 


13 




17 








123, 601 


84, 395 


25, 035 


7,746 


6,405 


20 








61,254 
62, 347 


43, 762 
40, 633 


12, 050 
12, 985 


3,780 
3,966 


1,654 
4,751 


8 




12 








1,458 


559 


678 


86 


134 


1 








1,121 
337 


453 
106 


516 
162 


82 
4 


69 
65 


1 












37,249 


26, 208 


5, 314 


4,008 


1,710 


9 








18, 526 
18,723 


13, 231 
12, 977 


2,769 
2,545 


2,060 
1,948 


462 
1,248 


4 




5 







CONJUGAL CONDITION. 

Table XIV. — Conjugal condition, by race, sex, and nativity — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



197 



Race, sex, and nativity. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 




160, 046 


114, 476 


24,346 


13, 989 


7,204 


31 








78, 229 
81, 817 


57, 503 
56, 973 


12, 087 
12, 259 


6,969 
7,020 


1,652 
5,552 


18 




13 








74, 210 


52, 155 


13, 806 


4,491 


3,734 


24 








35, 901 
38, 309 


26, 338 
25, 817 


6, 511 
7,295 


2,210 
2,281 


828 
2,906 


14 




10 








4,018 


2,107 


1,429 


235 


245 


2 








3,097 
921 


1,693 
414 


1,075 
354 


226 
9 


101 
144 


2 












81,818 


60, 214 


9,111 


9,263 


3,225 


5 








39, 231 

42,587 


29,472 
30,742 


4,501 
4,610 


4,533 
4,730 


723 
2,502 


2 




3 







DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 





111,986 


78,285 


17, 031 


11,608 


5, 054 


8 








55, 216 
56, 770 


39, 651 
38, 634 


8,436 
8, 595 


5,795 
5, 813 


1,331 
3,723 


3 




5 








56, 041 


38, 517 


9,867 


4,832 


2,821 


4 








27, 619 
28, 422 


19, 648 
18, 869 


4,760 
5,107 


2,474 
2, 358 


736 
2,085 


1 




3 








764 


286 


342 


63 


72 


1 








653 
111 


249 
37 


297 
45 


58 
5 


48 
24 


1 












55, 181 


39, 482 


6,822 


6,713 


2, 161 


3 








26,944 
23,237 


19,754 
19, 728 


3,379 
3,443 


3, 263 
3,450 


547 
1,614 


1 




2 









88,501 


61, 739 


11, 962 


10, 908 


3,825 


67 








43, 984 
44, 517 


31, 587 
30, 152 


5,939 
6,023 


5,446 
5,462 


976 
2,849 


36 




31 








40, 246 


27, 647 


6,661 


3,846 


2,058 


34 








19, 846 
20, 400 


14, 184 
13, 463 


3,200 
3,461 


1,942 
1,904 


502 
1,556 


18 




16 








559 


207 


221 


63 


68 










449 
110 


169 
38 


185 
36 


56 

7 


39 

29 














47, 696 


33, 885 


5,080 


6,999 


1,699 


33 








23, 689 
24,007 


17, 234 
16, 651 


2,554 
2,526 


3,448 
3,551 


435 
1,264 


18 




15 







198 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XIV. — Conjugal condition, by race, sex, and nativity — Continued. 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



CITY OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Race, sex, and nativity. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 




127,566 


87,294 


22, 573 


10,428 


7,180 


91 








62, 750 
64,816 


44,484 
42, 810 


11,190 
11,383 


5,206 
5, 222 


1,826 
5,354 


44 




47 








80,564 


54,172 


15, 613 


5,938 


4,787 


54 








39, 625 
40,939 


27, 943 
26, 229 


7,553 
8,060 


2,929 
3,009 


1,176 
3,611 


24 




30 








1,480 


612 


601 


125 


141 


1 








1,099 
381 


454 
158 


460 
141 


117 
8 


68 
73 






1 








45, 522 


32, 510 


6,359 


4,365 


2,252 


36 








22, 026 
23, 496 


16, 087 
16,423 


3,177 
3,182 


2,160 
2,205 


582 
1,670 


20 




16 









203, 191 


142,864 


30, 957 


20, 083 


9,254 


33 








101, 957 
101,234 


73, 846 
69, 018 


15, 407 
15,550 


10, 044 
10, 039 


2,638 
6,616 


22 




n 








118, 784 


82,443 


20, 803 


9,649 


5,868 


21 






Males 

Females 


59, 282 
59, 502 


42, 751 
39, 692 


10, 004 
10, 799 


4,877 
4,772 


1,639 
4,229 


11 

10 




2,403 


1,053 


926 


197 


222 


5 






Males 


1,886 
517 


849 
204 


729 
197 


189 
8 


114 
108 


5 








82, 004 


59, 368 


9,228 


10, 237 


3,164 


7 








40,789 
41,215 


30, 246 
29, 122 


4,674 
4,554 


4,978 
5,259 


885 
2,279 


6 




1 









15, 187 


10, 561 


2,222 


1,410 


992 


2 








6,765 
8,422 


4,806 
5,755 


1,089 
1,133 


702 
708 


168 
824 




Females 


2 




8,334 


5, 713 


1,396 


609 


616 










3,773 
4,561 


2,750 
2,963 


631 
765 


299 
310 


93 
523 














754 


349 


284 


57 


63 


1 








521 
233 


244 
105 


201 
83 


50 

7 


26 

37 






1 








6,099 


4,499 


542 


744 


313 


1 








2,471 
3,628 


1,812 
2,687 


257 
285 


353 
391 


49 
264 






1 







CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



199 



Table XIV. — Conjugal condition, by race, sex, and nativity — Continued. 
CITY OP PONCE. 



Race, sex, and nativity. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 




27, 952 


19, 986 


3,918 


2,427 


1, 615 


6 






Males 

Females 


13, 197 
14, 755 


9,674 
10, 312 


1,966 
1,952 


1,212 

1,215 


339 
1,276 


6 




14,268 


10, 060 


2, 305 


957 


946 








Males 1 

Females 


6,764 
7,504 


5,049 
5,011 


1,065 
1,240 


482 
475 


168 
778 










1,182 


540 


451 


62 


125 


4 






Males 

Females 


847 
335 


397 
143 


335 

116 


56 
6 


55 

70 


4 


Colored — 


12, 502 


9,386 


1,162 


1,408 


544 


2 


Males 

Females 


5,586 
6,916 


4,228 
5,158 


566 
596 


674 
734 


116 

428 


2 







CITY OF SAN JUAN. 



All classes 

Males 

Females... 

Native white.. 

Males 

Females... 

Foreign white. 

Males 

Females. . . 

Colored 

Males 

Females... 



32, 048 



15, 100 

16, 948 



12, 391 



5, 541 

6, 850 



2,872 



2, 190 
682 



16, 785 



7,369 
9,416 



11,088 
11,759 



4 222 

4^ 598 



1,612 



1.290 
322 

12, 415 

5,576 
6,839 



4,594 



2, 313 
2,281 



2, 095 



902 
1,193 



956 



699 
257 

1,543 

712 
831 



2,801 



1,397 
1,404 



308 
368 



139 

8 



1,978 
950 



1,804 



301 
1,503 



109 
690 



849 



131 

718 



200 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity. 

PORTO RICO. 
Total Population, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 

K?5& | Widowed, 
by mutual 
consent, i 


Unknow n. 


Total 


953, 243 


664, 077 


158, 570 


84,241 


46,052 


303 








418, 302 
54, 494 
38,654 
29, 740 
58, 735 
84,265 
64, 317 
91, 802 
69, 268 
33, 716 
19, 950 


418, 008 
52, 785 
34, 043 
22, 898 
37,858 
36, 576 
19, 758 
20, 978 
11,505 
5,936 
3,732 


43 


101 


21 

31 

59 

140 

478 

1,834 

2,900 

8,897 

12,013 

10, 742 

8,937 


129 




816 ! 837 
2,343 ! 2,195 
3,232 3,458 
11,568 j 8,807 
26,677 19,157 
25,935 j 15,706 
41,215 20,690 
26,717 i 9,014 
13, 808 3. 220 


25 




14 




12 




24 




21 




18 




22 




19 




10 


65 years and over 


6,216 


1,056 


9 



Total 

Under 15 years. . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



472, 261 



214, 806 
24, 806 
18, 113 
13, 465 
28, 199 
39, 469 
31,365 
46, 430 
29, 578 
16,758 
9,272 



339, 316 



214, 709 

24, 661 

17, 551 

12, 171 

21,780 

20,168 

10, 119 

10,040 

4,807 

2,123 

1,197 



78,689 



9 

34 

190 

467 

3,177 

10, 470 

12, 593 

22,084 

15,788 

9,277 

4,600 



42, 071 



11 

86 

354 

784 

3,123 

8,354 

7,893 

12, 110 

6,075 

2,417 

864 



12, 023 



12 

13 

8 

33 

107 

473 

749 

2,188 

2,896 

2,936 

2,608 



Total 


480, 982 


324, 761 


79,881 


42, 170 


34,029 


141 








203, 496 
29, 688 
20, 541 
16, 275 
30, 536 
44, 796 
32, 952 
45, 372 
29, 690 
16, 958 
10, 678 


203, 299 
28, 124 
16, 492 
10, 727 
16, 078 
16, 418 
9,639 
10,938 
6,698 
3,813 
2,535 


34 

782 

2,153 

2,765 

8,391 

16, 207 

13, 342 

19, 131 

10, 929 

4, 531 

1,616 


90 

751 

1,841 

2,674 

5,684 

10, 803 

7,813 

8,580 

2,939 

803 

192 


9 

18 

51 

107 

371 

1,361 

2,151 

6,709 

9,117 

7,806 

6,329 


64 




13 




4 




2 




12 




7 




7 


35 to 44 vears 


14 

7 




5 


65 vears and over 


6 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



201 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
PORTO RICO— Continued. 

Native White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


578, 009 


396, 654 


110, 208 


40, 593 


30, 355 


199 








255, 577 
33, 290 
23, 510 
17,947 
36, 036 
50, 909 
39,317 
55, 047 
34, 724 
19, 907 
11, 745 


255, 377 

32, 266 

20, 648 

13, 693 

22, 812 

20, 891 

10, 728 

10, 742 

5,366 

2,634 

1,497 


31 

557 

1,676 

2,338 

8,494 

19, 250 

18, 629 

28, 656 

17,611 

8,949 


57 

440 

1.144 

1,812 

4,385 
9,460 
7,922 
9,721 
3,985 
1,268 


9 

15 

35 

101 

330 

1,294 

2,029 

5,914 

7,749 

7, 052 

5,827 


103 




12 




7 




3 




15 




14 


30 to 34 years 


9 




14 




13 




4 


65 years and over 


4,017 


399 


5 



Native White Males. 



Total 


285, 303 


204,090 


53,089 


20, 250 


7,773 


101 








131,168 
14, 960 
10, 902 
7,975 
17, 239 
23,726 
19, 155 
27, 790 
17,252 
9,753 
5,383 


131,098 

14,886 

10, 587 

7,286 

13,412 

11,825 

5,723 

5, 427 

2,372 

993 

481 


6 

21 

124 

293 

2,235 

7,414 

8,841 

15, 039 

10, 281 

5,904 

2,931 


5 

40 

181 

371 

1,500 

4,137 

4,068 

5,871 

2,769 

982 

326 


5 

6 

6 

23 

87 

341 

519 

1,448 

1,822 

1,872 

1,644 


54 




7 


18 and 19 years 


4 




2 




5 




9 


30 to 34 years 


4 




5 




8 




2 


65 years and over 


1 



Native White Females. 



Total 


292, 706 


192, 564 


57, 119 


20,343 


22, 582 


98 








124, 409 
18, 330 
12, 608 
9,972 
18, 797 
27, 183 
20, 162 
27, 257 
17,472 
10, 154 
6,362 


124, 279 
17, 380 
10, 061 
6,407 
9,400 
9,066 
5,005 
5,315 
2,994 
1,641 
1,016 


25 

536 

1,552 

2,045 

6,259 

11, 836 
9,788 

13,617 
7,330 
3,045 
1,086 


52 

400 

963 

1,441 

2,885 

5,323 

3,854 

3,850 

1,216 

286 

73 


4 

9 

29 

78 

243 

953 

1,510 

4,466 

5,927 

5, 180 

4,183 


49 




5 




3 




1 




10 




5 


30 to 34 years 


5 




9 




5 




2 


65 years and over 


4 



202 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, WW. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, bij aye, sex, nice, and nativity — Continued. 

PORTO RICO— Continued. 
Foreign White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


11,417 


5, 119 


4,540 


807 


941 


10 








651 

343 

410 

239 

1,022 

• 1,547 

1,411 

2,535 

1,728 

918 

613 


651 
336 
383 
210 
823 
942 
613 
653 
309 
124 
75 












6 

26 

20 

149 

473 

629 

1,497 

1,035 

486 

219 


1 

1 

8 

47 

111 

134 

242 

156 

74 

33 














1 
3 

19 
34 
141 
226 
233 
284 










2 


30 to 34 years 


1 




2 




2 




1 




2 



Foreign White Males. 



Foreign White Females. 



Total 


8,892 


4,115 


3,534 


762 


472 


9 




344 

271 

326 

188 

825 

1,252 

1, 142 

2,047 

1,372 

701 

424 


344 
269 
323 
177 
724 
848 
538 
519 
231 
89 
53 












1 

2 

4 

56 

294 

460 

1,219 

878 

423 

197 


1 

1 

7 

44 

102 

124 

231 

148 

71 

33 




















1 

6 

19 

76 

113 

117 

140 






2 


30 to 34 years 


1 




2 




2 




1 


65 years and over 


1 



Total 


2,525 


1,004 


1,006 


45 


469 


1 




307 
72 
84 
51 
197 
295 
269 
488 
356 
217 
189 


307 
67 
60 
33 
99 
94 
75 

134 
78 
35 
22 










5 

24 

16 

93 

179 

169 

278 

157 

63 

22 














1 
3 
9 
10 
11 
8 
3 


1 
2 
13 
15 
65 
113 
116 
144 








25 to 29 years... 




30 to 34 years 


















1 







CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



203 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

PORTO RICO— Continued. 

Colored, Both Sexes. 



Age period. Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total : 363, 817 


262, 304 


43, 822 


42,841 


14, 756 


94 


Under 15 years 162,074 


161, 980 

.20, 183 

13, 012 

8,995 

14, 223 

14, 743 

8,417 

9,583 

5,830 

3,178 

2,160 


12 

253 

641 

874 

2, 925 

6,954 

6,677 

11,062 

8,071 

4,373 

1,980 


44 

396 

1,050 

1,638 

4,375 

9,586 

7,650 

10, 727 

4,873 

1,878 

624 


12 

16 

24 

38 

145 

521 

837 

2,842 

4,038 

3,457 

2,826 


26 


15 to 17 vears 20,861 


13 


18 and 19 vears '• 14, 734 


7 


20 years 11,554 


9 


21 to 24 years 21,677 


9 


25 to 29 vears 31, 809 


5 


30 to 34 years... 23,589 


8 


35 to 44 years 34, 220 


6 


45 to 54 years 22,816 


4 


55 to 64 years 12,891 

65 years and over 1 7, 592 


5 
2 



Colored Males. 



Total 


i 
178,066 131,111 | 22,066 


21,059 


3,778 


52 


Under 15 years 


83, 294 83, 267 3 
9,575 9,506 12 
6, 885 6, 641 64 
5,302 4,708 170 
10, 135 7, 644 886 
14,491 7,485 ' 2,762 
11,068 3,858 3,292 
16,593 4,094 5,826 
10, 954 2, 204 4, 629 
6,304 : 1,041 2,950 
3,465 , 663 1,472 


6 

45 

172 

406 

1,579 

4,115 

3,701 

6,008 

3,158 

1,364 

505 


7 

7 

2 

10 

19 

126 

211 

664 

961 

947 

824 


11 
5 


18 and 19 years 

20 years 


6 

8 
7 




3 


30 to 34 vears 


6 
1 




2 


55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 


2 
1 



Colored Females. 



Total 

Under 15 years. .. 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



185, 751 



78, 780 
11,286 
7,849 
6,252 
11, 542 
17, 318 
12, 521 
17, 627 
11 862 
6,587 
4,127 



131,193 



21,756 



78, 713 
10, 677 
6,371 
4, 287 
6,579 
7,258 
4,559 
5, 489 
3,626 
2, 137 
1,497 



9 

241 

577 

704 

2,039 

4,192 

3, 385 

5, 236 

3,442 

1,423 

508 



21,782 



10, 978 



38 


5 


15 


351 


9 


8 


878 


22 


1 


1,232 


28 


1 


2, 796 


126 


2 


5,471 


395 


2 


3,949 


626 


2 


4,719 


2,178 


5 


1,715 


3,077 


2 


514 


2,510 


3 


119 


2,002 


1 



42 



204 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 
Total Population, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


99, 645 


68,257 


20,674 


5,385 


5,286 


43 








44, 275 


44. 245 


4 
97 


1 

39 

108 

162 

507 

1,196 

1,101 

1,359 

605 

223 

84 


4 
1 
2 

26 

46 

217 

371 

1,001 

1,309 

1,224 

1,085 


21 




5,662 5,521 


4 




3, 910 3 520 278 


2 




3,045 
5,848 
8,424 
6,795 
9,572 
6,211 
3,679 
2,224 


2,433 

3,788 

3,378 

1,815 

1,804 

937 

514 

302 


424 
1,502 
3,630 
3,504 
5,406 
3,358 
1,718 

753 




21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 


5 
3 

4 


35 to 44 years 


2 
2 






65 years and over 







Total 


49, 224 


34, 799 


10,295 i 2,689 1,415 


26 




22, 758 
2,611 
1,808 
1,347 
2,789 
3,786 
3,309 
4,846 
3,096 
1,823 
1,051 


22, 744 

2,600 

1,766 

1,276 

2,197 

1,860 

925 

844 

336 

159 

92 


1 1 


12 




6 ; 3 

30 ; 10 

49 J 20 

410 ! 167 

1,376 ' 478 

1,731 : 542 

2,914 : 833 

2,062 403 

1,155 ! 162 

561 71 




2 






2 




2 
12 

69 
110 
253 
294 
347 
327 




21 to 24 years 


3 

3 




1 




2 




1 






65 years and over 







Total 


50,421 


33, 458 


10, 379 


2,696 


3,871 


17 




21 , 517 
3,051 
2, 102 
1,698 
3, 059 
4,638 
3,486 
4,726 
3,115 
1,856 
1,173 


21, 501 

2,921 

1,754 

1,157 

1,591 

1,518 

890 

960 

601 

355 

210 


3 

91 

248 

375 

1,092 

2,254 

1,773 

2,492 

1,296 

563 

192 


1 

36 

98 

142 

340 

718 

559 

526 

202 

61 

13 


3 

1 

2 

24 

34 
148 
261 

748 
1,015 

877 
758 


9 




2 






20 years- 


2 


25 to 29 years... 




30 to 34 years 


3 


45 to 54 years 


1 


65 years and over 







CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



205 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF AG UADILLA— Continued. 

Native White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


84, 563 


57, 325 


18, 423 


4,091 


4,682 


42 








37, 694 
4,720 
3,240 
2,594 
4,897 
7,171 
5,890 
8, 205 
5, 255 
3,063 
1,834 


37, 666 

4,592 

2,906 

2,051 

3,100 

2,775 

1,494 

1,432 

730 

374 

205 


4 

91 

243 

391 

1,356 

3,278 

3,185 

4,844 

2,937 

1,462 

632 


1 

32 

87 

127 

395 

927 

860 

1,030 

433 

144 

55 


2 

1 

2 

'25 

42 

188 

347 

897 

1,153 

1,083 

942 






4 
















3 




4 




2 






55 to 64 years 













Native White Males. 



Native White Females. 



Total 


41, 776 


29,464 


9,011 


2,038 


1,238 


25 








19, 490 
2,145 
1,501 
1,143 
2,316 
3,205 
2,859 
4,144 
2, 622 
1,510 
841 


19, 477 

2,137 

1,463 

1,082 

1,819 

1,541 

774 

706 

277 

124 

64 


1 

5 

26 

45 

360 

1,226 

1,551 

2,566 

1,789 

980 

462 






12 


15 to 17 years 


1 

10 
14 
123 
374 
427 
642 
293 
109 
45 




2 


18 and 19 years 




2 


20 years 


2 

12 
61 
106 
228 
262 
297 
270 








25 to 29 years 


3 






2 
1 




55 to 64 years 













Total 


42,787 


27, 861 


9,412 


2,053 


3,444 


17 








18, 204 
2,575 
1,739 
1,451 
2,581 
3,966 
3,031 
4,061 
2,633 
1,553 
993 


18, 189 

2,455 

1,443 

969 

1,281 

1,234 

720 

726 

453 

250 

141 


3 

86 

217 

346 

996 

2,052 

1,634 

2,278 

1,148 

482 

170 


1 

31 

77 

113 

272 

553 

433 

388 

140 

35 

10 


2 

1 

2 

23 

30 

127 

241 

669 

891 

786 

672 






2 


18 and 19 years 




20 years 






2 


25 to 29 years 






3 


35 to 44 years 






1 


55 to 64 years 




65 years and over 









20(5 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO. 1899. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by aye, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA— Continued. 

Foreign White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 




735 


295 


343 


38 


59 










34 
18 
26 
17 
70 

115 
77 

165 
99 
67 
47 


34 

18 

22 

17 

60 

66 

32 

31 

8 

6 

1 






















4 


















10 
47 
37 
110 
76 
43 
16 










1 
7 
12 
9 
4 
5 


1 
1 

12 

6 

14 

25 



























Foreign White Males. 



Total 

Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



587 



18 
15 
21 
15 
50 
91 
67 
142 
83 
49 
36 



248 



272 



34 



33 



Foreign White Females. 



Total 


148 


47 


71 


4 


26 












16 
3 
5 
2 
20 
24 
10 
23 
16 
18 
11 


16 
3 
1 
2 

12 
4 
4 
3 
1 
1 








15 to 17 years 











4 








20 years 








21 to 24 years 


8 
20 

5 
13 
10 

9 

2 








25 to 29 vears 








30 to 34 vears 


1 

2 

1 








5 
4 
8 
9 












65 vears and over 















CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



207 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA— Continued. 

Colored, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 



Total 

Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total. 



14, 347 



Single. 



10, 637 



6,547 


6,545 


924 


911 


644 


592 


434 


365 


881 


628 


1,138 


537 


828 


289 


1,202 


341 


857 


199 


549 


134 


343 


96 



Married. 



Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 



1,256 



6 
31 
33 
136 
305 
282 
452 
345 
213 
105 



7 

21 

35 

112 

268 

234 

317 

163 

75 

24 



Widowed. 



545 



1 
4 
28 
23 
92 
150 
127 
118 



Unknown. 



Colored Males. 



Total 


6,861 


5,087 


1,012 


617 


144 


1 








3,250 
451 
286 
189 
423 
490 
383 
560 
391 
264 
174 


3,249 

448 

282 

179 

330 

257 

123 

110 

52 

30 

27 






1 






i 

4 

4 

48 

123 

148 

251 

207 

141 

85 


2 












6 

44 

103 

109 

181 

102 

49 

21 










1 




7 
3 
18 
30 
44 
41 




30 to 34 years 
















65 years and over 







Colored Females. 



Total 

Under 15 years. .. 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



V 



3, 297 
473 
358 
245 
458 
648 
445 
642 
466 
285 
169 



5,550 



3,296 
463 
310 
186 
298 
280 
166 
231 
147 
104 



896 



5 
27 
29 
88 
182 
134 
201 
138 
72 
20 



639 



5 
21 
29 
68 
165 
125 
136 
61 
26 
3 



401 



1 
4 
21 
20 
74 
120 
83 
77 



208 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 

Total Population, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


162, 308 


111,162 


31, 027 


11. 840 


8,249 


30 










72, 981 
9,220 
6,474 
5, 285 
9,602 
14, 374 
11,174 
15,617 
9,452 
5,191 
2,938 


72, 958 
8,946 
5, 700 
4,075 
6, 005 
5,562 
2,832 
2, 703 
1, 345 
667 
369 


9 5 
151 


6 

8 

15 

25 

106 

422 

618 

1,745 

2, 126 

1,817 

1,361 


3 




1 




448 
639 
2,214 
5,499 
5,410 
8,332 
4,855 
2,380 
1,090 


311 

543 

1,272 

2,888 

2, 310 

2, 835 

1,121 

324 

117 






3 




5 




3 




4 




2 




5 




3 


65 years and over 


1 



Males. 



Total 


80, 901 


57,446 


15, 335 


5,922 


2,185 


13 








37, 489 
4,078 
2, 952 
2,423 
4,572 
6,927 
5,575 
8,067 
4,802 
2,609 
1,407 


37, 481 

4,064 

2,892 

2,237 

3,573 

3,379 

1,533 

1,357 

574 

229 

127 


2 

7 

25 

74 

555 

2,156 

2,642 

4,528 

2,914 

1,634 

798 




4 

3 

1 

4 

31 

115 

175 

470 

516 

488 

378 


2 




4 

34 

106 

411 

1, 276 

1,222 

1,712 

795 

258 

104 










2 




2 




1 


30 to 34 years... 


3 








3 






65 years and over 









Total 

Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



81,407 



53,716 



15, 692 



35, 492 


35, 477 


7 


5,142 


4,882 


144 


3,522 


2,808 


423 


2,862 


1,838 


565 


5, 030 


2,432 


1,659 


7,447 


2,183 


3,343 


5,599 


1,299 


2,768 


7,550 


1,346 


3,804 


4,650 


771 


1,941 


2,582 


438 


746 


1,531 


242 


292 



5,918 



5 
110 

277 

437 

861 

1,612 

1,088 

1,123 

326 

66 

13 



6,064 



2 
5 

14 

21 

75 

307 

443 

1,275 

1,610 

1,329 

983 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



209 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO— Continued. 

Native White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


123, 601 


84,395 


25,035 


7,746 


6,405 


20 








56, 369 
6,973 
4,898 
4,013 
7,348 

10, 798 
8,520 

11,729 
6,972 
3,828 
2,153 


56, 353 

6,764 

4,304 

3,056 

4,535 

4,039 

2,008 

1,849 

861 

416 

210 


7 
122 
871 

545 
1,859 
4,528 
4,476 
6,682 
3,799 
1,812 

834 


4 

, 80 

212 

392 

860 

1,888 

1,532 

1,838 

700 

185 

55 


4 

7 

11 

19 

90 

340 

502 

1,358 

1,608 

1,413 

1,053 




15 to 17 years 




18 «nd 19 years 










4 






30 to 34 vears 






2 




4 






65 years and over 


1 



Native White Males. 



Native White Females. 



Total 


61,254 


43, 762 


12,050 


3,780 


1,654 










28,960 
3,046 
2,238 
1,815 
3,468 
5, 122 
4,209 
5,981 
3,532 
1,897 
986 


28, 955 

3,034 

2,197 

1,685 

2,718 

2,481 

1,132 

960 

392 

139 

69 


1 
6 
17 

55 
448 
1,743 
2,139 
3,551 
2,260 
1,229 
601 




3 

3 

1 

3 

29 

94 

138 

358 

382 

376 

267 


1 


15 to 17 years 


3 

23 

72 

271 

803 

798 

1,112 

496 

153 

49 




18 and 19 years 




20 years 




21 to 24 years 


2 






35 to 44 years 








55 to 64 years 

















Total 


62, 347 


40, 633 


12.985 


3,966 


4,751 


12 








Under 15 years 


27,409 
3,927 
2,660 
2,198 
3,880 
5,676 
4,311 
5,748 
3,440 
1,931 
1,167 


27, 398 fi 


4 

77 
189 
320 
589 
1,085 
734 
726 
204 

32 
6 


1 

4 

10 

16 

61 

246 

364 

1,000 

1,226 

1,037 

786 




15 to 17 vears 


3,730 

2,107 

1,371 

1,817 

1,558 

876 

889 

469 

277 

141 


116 

354 

490 

1,411 

2,785 
2,337 
3,131 
1,539 
583 
233 




18 and 19 vears 






1 




25 to 29 years 


2 


30 to 34 years 










2 






65 years and over 


1 



8490—00- 



-14 



210 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sea:, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO— Continued. 

Foreign White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


1,458 


659 


678 


86 


134 


1 








48 

34 

40 

35 

142 

179 

147 

339 

251 

131 

112 


48 

33 

40 

33 

122 

112 

63 

60 

28 

13 

7 












1 


















1 

12 
58 
69 
232 
167 
87 
51 


1 

8 

7 

11 

26 














2 
4 

21 














21 34 


1 




5 

7 


26 
47 




65 years and over 







Foreign White Males. 



Foreign White Females. 



Total 


1,121 


453 


516 


82 


69 


1 










26 
21 
27 
24 
122 
141 
125 
269 
186 
104 
76 


26 

20 

27 

24 

108 

101 

60 

53 

20 

10 

4 










1 


























6 

32 
54 
176 
131 
73 
43 


8 

7 

10 

26 

19 

5 

7 








1 

1 
14 
15 
16 
22 














1 






65 years and over 







Total 


337 


106 


162 


4 


65 










22 
13 
13 
11 
20 
38 
22 
70 
65 
27 
36 


22 
13 
13 
9 
14 
11 
3 
7 
8 
3 
3 


























1 
6 
26 
15 
56 
36 
14 
8 


1 












1 : 


30 to 34 years. . . 


1 


3 








2 


19 | 




10 






25 









CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



211 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued 

DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO— Continued. 

Colored, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


37,249 


26, 208 


5,314 


4,008 


1,710 


9 








16, 564 
2,213 
1,536 
1,237 
2,112 
3,397 
2,507 
3,549 
2,229 
1,232 
673 


16, 557 

2,149 

1,356 

986 

1,348 

1,411 

761 

794 

456 

238 

152 


2 

28 

77 

93 

343 

913 

865 

1,418 

889 

481 

205 


1 

34 

99 

150 

404 

993 

767 

971 

400 

134 

55 


2 

1 

4 

6 

16 

80 

112 

366 

484 

378 

261 


2 




1 








2 




1 








2 












1 


65 years and over 







Colored Males. 



Colored Females. 



Total 


18,526 


13,231 


2,769 


2,060 


462 


4 






Under 15 years 


8,503 

1,011 

687 

584 

982 

1,664 

1,241 

1,817 

1,084 

608 

345 


8,500 

1,010 

668 

528 

747 

797 

341 

344 

162 

80 

54 


1 




1 


1 




1 
11 

34 
132 
466 
414 
574 
280 
100 

48 




18 and 19 years 


8 
19 
101 
381 
449 
801 
523 
332 
154 








1 

2 
20 
36 
98 
119 
96 
89 


2 










30 to 34 years 


1 














65 years and over 









Total 


18,723 


12, 977 


2,545 


1,948 


1,248 


5 








8,061 

1,202 

849 

653 

1,130 

1,733 

1,266 

1,732 

1,145 

624 

328 


8,057 
1,139 
688 
458 
601 
614 
420 
450 
294 
158 
98 


1 

28 

69 

74 

242 

532 

416 

617 

366 

149 

51 


1 

33 
88 
116 
272 
527 
353 
397 
120 
34 
7 


1 

1 

4 

5 

14 

60 

76 

268 

365 

282 

172 


1 


15 to 17 years 


1 


18 and 19 years 










1 


25 to 29 years 




30 to 34 years 


1 


35 to 44 years 




45 to 54 years 






1 











212 KEPOKT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO EICO, 1899. 

Table XV. — Conjugal conditio) i, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 
Total Population, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


160,046 


114,476 


24,346 


13, 989 


7,204 


31 








69, 765 
9,310 
6,490 
4,653 
10, 277 
14, 370 
10,588 
15, 332 
9,749 
5,908 
3,604 


69, 731 
9,089 
5,869 
3,748 
7,040 
6,973 
3,762 
4,086 
2,191 
1,217 
770 


9 
127 


2 
84 


4 

8 

16 

11 

76 

271 

395 

1,343 

1,829 

1,734 

1,517 


19 




2 


18 and 19 years 


300 305 
427 467 








1,709 
4,052 
3,846 
6, 326 
4,173 
2,294 
1,083 


1,452 
3,070 

2,584 

3,677 

1,554 

662 

232 




25 to 29 years 


4 


30 to 34 years 


1 








2 




1 


65 years and over 


2 



Males. 



Females. 



Total 


78,229 


57,503 


12,087 


6,969 


1,652 


18 








35, 516 
4,318 
3,100 
2,139 
4, 825 
6,673 
5,003 
7,543 
4,749 
2,795 
1,568 


35,501 

4,304 

3,028 

1,948 

3,854 

3,704 

1,830 

1,843 

878 

379 

234 


1 
3 

28 

68 

469 

1,586 

1,844 

3,344 

2, 447 

1,506 

791 




2 

4 

1 

5 

18 

67 

89 

302 

399 

411 

354 


12 




7 

43 

118 

484 

1,314 

1,240 

2,054 

1,023 

498 

188 


















2 












2 




1 


65 years and over 


1 



Total 


81,817 


56,973 


12,259 


7,020 


6,552 


13 








34,249 
4,992 
3,390 
2,514 
5,452 
7,697 
5,585 
7,789 
5,000 
3,113 
2,036 


34, 230 

4,785 


8 
124 


2 

77 

262 

349 

968 

1,756 

1,344 

1,523 

631 

164 

44 


2 

4 

15 

6 

58 

204 

306 

1,041 

1,430 

1,323 

1,163 


7 




2 




2,841 : 272 
1,800 359 










3,186 
3,269 
1,932 
2,243 
1,313 
838 
536 


1,2-iO 
2,466 
2,002 
2,982 
1,726 
788 
292 






2 


30 to 34 years 


1 










65 years and over 


1 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



218 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON— Continued. 

Native White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total " 


74,210 


52,155 


13,806 


4,491 


3,734 


24 








33,230 
4,411 
3,008 


33, 208 
4,296 
2.693 


4 

77 

180 

278 

1,090 

2,485 

2,277 

3,472 

2,195 

1,205 

543 


1 

35 
131 
177 

484 
986 
853 
1,120 
461 
180 
63 


1 

1 
4 
4 
48 
170 
228 
694 
891 
930 
768 


16 




2 








2,102 j 1,643 
4,796 3,174 
6,497. I 2,853 
4,795 1,436 
6,779 1-493 








25 to 29 years 


3 


30 to 34 years 


1 








4,263 
2,709 
1,620 


715 
394 
250 


1 








1 



Native White Males. 



Native White Females. 



Total 


35,901 


26,338 


6,511 


2,210 


828 


14 








16,931 
1,995 
1,396 
933 
2,227 
2,966 
2,204 
3,289 
2,026 
1,254 
680 


16, 918 

1,991 

1,366 

843 

1,770 

1,550 

714 

697 

291 

125 

73 


1 

2 

14 

39 

284 

943 

1,055 

1,774 

1,236 

773 

390 




1 
1 


11 




1 

16 
48 
159 
431 
387 
662 
313 
142 
61 










3 
14 
40 
48 
156 
185 
214 
166 










2 


30 to 34 years. . 










1 






65 years and over 







Total 


38,309 


25,817 


7,295 


2,281 


2,906 


10 








16,299 
2,416 
1,612 
1,169 
2,569 
3,531 
2,591 
3,490 
2,237 
1,455 
940 


16,290 

2, 305 

1,327 

800 

1,404 

1,303 

722 

796 

424 

269 

177 


3 

75 

166 

239 

806 

1,542 

1,222 

1,698 

959 

432 

153 


1 
34 
115 

129 
325 
555 
466 
458 
148 
38 
12 




5 






2 




4 
1 
34 
130 
180 
538 
706 
716 
597 














1 


30 to 34 years. . . 


1 


35 to 44 years 












1 



214 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON— Continued. 

Foreign White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


4,018 


2,107 


1.429 


235 


245 


2 










288 
162 
206 
95 
392 


2S8 
161 












1 








195 11 
81 8 
314 63 
37) 161 
270 216 
269 505 
95 295 










3 
15 
44 

48 
71 
33 
17 
4 














579 
642 
888 
489 
241 
136 


3 
8 
43 
66 
65 
60 
















55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 


35 
25 


123 

46 


1 

1 



Foreign White Males. 



Total 

Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



3,097 



147 
135 
172 

79 
321 
477 
443 
691 
369 
178 

85 



1,693 



147 

135 

171 

75 

287 

338 

236 

202 

65 

22 

15 



1 

1 

20 

97 

158 

400 

246 

111 

41 



220 



Foreign White Females. 



Total 

Under 16 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



141 
27 
34 
16 
71 

102 
99 

197 

120 
63 
51 



141 
26 
24 
9 
27 
33 
34 
67 
30 
13 
10 



354 



1 
10 

7 
43 
64 
68 
105 
49 
12 

5 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



215 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF B A YAMON— Continued. 

Colored, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. I Unknown. 


Total 


81,818 60,214 


9,111 


9,263 


3,225 


5 






36, 247 
4,737 
3,276 
2,456 


36, 235 
4,632 


5 
49 


1 

49 

174 

287 

953 

2,040 

1,683 

2,386 

1,060 

465 

165 




15 to 17 years 


7 

12 

7 

28 

98 

159 

606 

872 

739 

694 






2,981 i 109 
2.021 141 




20 years 




21 to 24 years 


5,089 3.552 556 






7,294 
5,251 
7,665 
4,997 
2,958 
1,848 


3,749 1,406 
2,056 i 1,353 
2,324 ' 2,349 
1,381 , 1,683 
788 i 966 
495 494 


1 




35 to 44 years 






1 


55 to 64 years 


65 years and over 













Colored Males. 



Colored Females. 



Total 


39, 231 


29,472 


4,501 


4,633 


723 


2 






18, 438 
2,188 
1,532 
1,127 
2,277 
3,230 
2,356 
3,563 
2,354 
1,363 
803 


18,436 
2,178 
1,491 
1,030 
1,797 






1 

3 

1 

2 

4 

27 

37 

126 

188 

170 

164 


1 


15 to 17 years 


1 
13 

28 
165 


6 

27 

67 

311 

841 

808 

1,323 

678 

339 

133 




18 and 19 years 




20 years 








25 to 29 years 


1,816 | 546 
880 631 




30 to 34 years 




35 to 44 years 


944 
622 
232 
146 


1,170 
965 
622 
360 






1 




65 years and over 









Total 


42,587 


30,742 


4,610 


4,730 1 2,602 


3 




17,809 
2,549 
1,744 
1,329 
2,812 
4,064 
2,895 
4,102 
2,643 
1,595 
1,045 


17,799 

2,454 

1,490 

991 

1,755 

1,933 

1,176 

1,380 

859 

556 

349 


5 

48 

96 

113 

391 

860 

722 

1,179 

718 

344 

134 


1 

43 

147 

220 

642 

1,199 

875 

1,063 

382 

126 

32 


2 

4 

11 

5 

24 

71 

122 

480 

684 

569 

630 




15 to 17 years 




18 and 19 years 




20 years 




21 to 24 vears 








30 to 34 years 




35 to 44 years 




45 to 54 years 




55 to 64 years 













216 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 
Total Population, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


111,986 


78, 285 


17,031 


11, 608 


5,054 


8 








51,016 
6, 195 
4,468 
3,526 
6,537 
9,764 
7,364 

10, 357 
0,677 
3,879 
2, 203 


50, 988 
5,970 
3,823 
2,641 
3,988 
4,063 
2,221 
2,306 
1,195 
655 
435 


5 

74 

264 

356 

1,254 

2,813 

2,730 

4,336 

2,938 

1,598 

663 


23 

150 

377 

516 

1,248 

2,726 

2,113 

2, 770 

1,156 

413 

116 








1 

4 

13 

45 

161 

299 

942 

1,388 

1,212 

989 














2 




1 


30 to 34 vears. . . 


1 




3 








1 


65 vears and over 







Total 

Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 vears 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



55, 216 



26, 216 
2,806 
2,028 
1,568 
3,063 
4,430 
3,558 
6,231 
3,332 
1,966 
1,018 



39, 651 



26,215 

2,780 

1,927 

1,363 

2,223 

2,108 

1,106 

1,082 

493 

223 

131 



8,436 



5,795 



1 

3 

13 

59 

354 

1,118 

1,328 

2,294 

1,691 

1,083 

492 



22 
86 
144 

474 

1,169 

1,053 

1,640 

801 

318 



1 

2 

2 

11 

35 

71 

214 

347 

341 

307 



Total ' 56, 770 


38,634 


8,596 


5,813 


3,723 


5 


Under 15 years. . 24,800 


24,773 

3,190 

1,896 

1,278 

1,765 

1,955 

1,115 

1,224 

702 

432 

304 


4 

71 

251 

297 

900 

1,695 

1,402 

2,042 

1,247 

516 

171 


23 
128 






15 to 17 vears 3, 389 






18 and 19 vears 2, 440 


291 


2 




20 vears 1, 958 


372 ! 11 

774 i 34 

1, 557 126 




21 to 24 vears ! 3,474 


1 


25 to 29 vears. 5,334 


1 


30 to 34 years | 3,806 

35 to 44 vears ' 5,126 


1,060 

1,130 

355 

95 

28 


228 
728 
1,041 
871 
682 


1 

2 


45 to 54 vears 3, 345 




55to64vears 1,913 









CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



217 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA— Continued. 

Native White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


56,041 


38, 517 


9,867 


4,832 


2,821 


4 








25, 186 


25, 169 
3,045 
1,967 
1,295 


4 

40 

142 

204 


13 

64 

164 

231 

525 

1,162 

918 

1,127 

446 

149 

33 






15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years 


3,150 
2, 276 
1,737 
3,410 
4,915 
3,703 
5,227 
3,331 
1,967 
1,139 


1 

3 

7 

23 

88 

168 

514 

778 

677 

562 










2,097 j 764 
1,991 1,673 
1,020 ! 1,597 
1,018 j 2,567 
482 1 - 625 


1 


25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 


1 




1 






55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 


261 
172 


879 
372 


1 



Native White Males. 



Native White Females. 



Total 


27,619 


19,648 


4,760 


2,474 


736 


1 








12, 915 

1,438 

1,011 

747 

1,595 

2,277 

1,794 

2,667 

1,673 

964 

538 


12, 914 

1,425 

963 

659 

1,192 

1,079 

519 

522 

216 

102 

57 


1 
1 

5 
31 
203 
666 
743 
1,314 
952 
571 
273 










11 
42 
56 
194 
508 
488 
718 
317 
114 
26 


1 

1 

1 

6 

24 

44 

113 

188 

176 

182 


































1 


65 years and over 









Total 


28, 422 


18, 869 


5,107 


2,358 


2,086 


3 






Under 15 years 


12, 271 
1,712 
1,265 

990 
1,815 
2,638 
1,909 
2,560 
1,658 
1,003 

601 


12, 255 
1,620 
1,004 
636 
905 
912 
501 
496 
266 
159 
115 


3 

39 
137 
173 
561 

1,007 
854 

1,253 

673 

308 

99 


13 

53 

122 

175 

331 

654 

430 

409 

129 

35 

7 






15 to 17 years 








2 






6 






17 i 1 




64 


30 to 34 years 


124 
401 
590 
501 
380 






1 



















218 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RIOO, 1899. 

Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by aye, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA— Continued. 

Foreign White, Both Sexes. 



Foreign White Males. 



Foreign White Females. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


764 


286 


342 


fiS 


72 










Under 15 years 


35 
19 
24 
15 
56 
88 
75 
194 
123 
77 
58 


35 
19 
23 
13 
43 
47 
23 
47 
19 
8 
9 










15 to 17 years 










18 and 19 years 




l 
1 
3 
4 
6 
23 
17 
6 
2 






20 years 


1 
9 
35 
44 
120 
72 
40 
21 








1 
2 

2 
3 

15 
23 
26 








30 to 34 vears 












55 to 64 years 




65 years and over 









Total 


653 


249 


297 


58 


48 


, 






Under 15 years 


19 
16 
22 
12 
50 
73 
64 
174 
114 
66 
43 


19 
16 
21 
11 
39 
46 
23 
40 
19 
8 
7 








15 to 17 years 








18 and 19 years 




1 
1 
3 
3 
5 
22 
16 
5 
2 












21 to 24 years 


7 
23 
34 
109 
66 
37 
21 


1 
1 
2 
2 
13 
16 
13 




25 to 29 years 




30 to 34 years 






1 






55 to 64 years 




65 years and over 









Total 


Ill 


37 


45 


5 


24 








16 

3 

2 

3 

6 

15 

11 

20 

9 

11 

15 


16 
3 

2 
2 
4 
1 








15 to 17 years 








18 and 19 years 










1 
2 
12 

10 
11 
6 
3 






21 to 24 years 








1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 I 


30 to 34 years 


1 




7 


1 1 .. 




2 






7 1 


65 years and over 


2 


13 L. 








1 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



219 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA— Continued. 

Colored, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


55,181 


39, 482 


6,822 


6,713 


2,161 


3 








25, 795 
3,026 
2,168 
1,774 
3,071 
4,761 
3,586 
4,936 
3,223 
1,835 
1,006 


25,784 

2, 906 

1,833 

1,333 

1,848 

2,025 

1,178 

1,241 

694 

386 

254 


1 

34 

122 

151 

481 

1,105 

1,089 


10 

86 

212 

284 

720 

1,560 

1.189 














1 

6 
21 
71 
129 
425 
595 
612 
401 




20 years 






1 


25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 




1 




1,649 1,620 
1,241 693 

679 258 

270 


1 























Colored Males. 



Colored Females. 



Total 


26, 944 


19,754 


3,379 


3,263 


647 


1 




13,282 

1,352 

995 


13, 282 

1,339 

943 










15 to 17 years 


2 
8 


11 

43 

87 

277 

658 

560 

900 

468 

199 

60 






1 

1 

4 

10 

25 

99 

146 

149 

112 






809 693 28 






1,418 
2,080 
1,700 
2,390 
1,545 
936 
437 


992 144 
983 ; 429 
564 551 


1 






30 to 34 years 






620 

258 

113 

67 


871 
673 
475 
198 



















Total 


28,237 


19,728 


3,443 


3,450 


1,614 


2 








12, 513 
1,674 
1,173 
965 
1,653 
2,681 
1,886 


12,502 | 1 
1,567 1 32 
890 114 
640 i 123 
856 , 337 
1,042 1 676 
614 1 538 


10 

75 

169 

197 

443 

902 

629 

720 

225 

59 

21 












18 and 19 years 








5 
17 










61 




30 to 34 years 


104 


35 to 44 years 


2, 546 721 778 


326 
449 
363 
289 


1 




1,678 
899 
569 


436 
273 
187 


568 

204 

72 



















220 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table X\.-ConjugaJ condition, by age, sex, race, ami nativity-Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 
Total Population, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 



Total. 



Under 15 years — 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years.... 

20 years • 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Total. Single. 



88, 501 



39,731 i 
4,894 
3,404 
2,615 
5,049 
7,463 I 
5,664 
8,390 
5,865 
3,371 
2, 055 



I Living 
I together as 

Married. | HftSft | Widowed. 

by mutual 

consent. 



61,739 



39,681 
4,696 
2,920 
1, 937 
3, 164 
3,196 
1,776 
2,035 
1,243 
669 
422 



11,962 

3 

63 

189 

214 

794 

1,781 

1,752 

3,016 

2,314 

1,254 

582 



10, 908 



22 

121 

291 

450 

1,050 

2,384 

1,960 

2,705 

1,282 

492 

151 



3,825 



1 
4 
1 

10 
36 
98 
175 
627 
1,021 
953 
899 



Unknown. 



24 
10 
3 
4 
5 
4 
1 
7 
5 
3 
1 



Males. 



Total 

Under 15 years.... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years.... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years. . . . . 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Total. 



43, 984 



Under 15 years 
15 to 17 years 
18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years.. 
25 to 29 years 
30 to 34 years 
35 to 44 years 
45 to 54 years 
55 to 64 years 
65 years and over 



20, 602 
2, 273 
1,603 
1,171 
2,367 
3,433 
2,687 
4,172 
2, 955 
1,736 
985 



31, 587 



20, 588 

2, 241 

1,525 

1,010 

1,745 

1,695 

873 

966 

531 

276 

137 



5,939 



5 
27 
41 
242 
703 
795 
1,517 
1,317 
856 
436 



Females. 



6,446 

4 
18 
49 
110 
370 

1,011 
973 

1,541 
874 
365 
131 



976 



3 

1 

6 

6 

22 

45 

145 

231 

237 

280 



36 

10 
6 
1 
4 
4 
2 
1 
3 
2 
2 
1 




CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



221 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO— Continued. 

Native White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


40, 246 


27, 647 


6,661 


3,846 


2, 058 


34 








17,916 
2,246 
1,579 
1,152 
2,397 
3,430 
2,635 
3,865 
2,574 
1,525 
927 


17, 892 

2, 158 

1,355 

859 

1,503 

1,460 

761 

847 

461 

218 

133 


2 

38 

110 

113 

480 

1,045 

1,045 

1,737 

1,180 

628 

283 


6 
47 
112 
174 
386 
859 
738 
930 
401 
151 
42 


1 


15 




3 




1 
5 


1 




1 




26 2 


25 to 29 years. . . 


64 
91 
346 
528 
528 
468 


2 


30 to 34 years... 






5 




4 






65 years and over 


1 



Native White Males. 



Native White Females. 



Total 


19, 846 


14,184 


3,200 


1,942 


502 


18 








9,266 

1,028 

722 

501 

1,110 

1,590 

1,227 

1,946 

1,268 

772 


9,257 
1,018 
688 
441 
830 
793 
385 
436 
195 
99 




2 
5 

17 
39 
132 
377 
367 
555 
291 
120 
37 




7 




2 
16 
17 
145 
407 
454 
869 
664 
425 
201 




3 




1 

3 

2 

12 

21 

84 

116 

128 

135 






1 




1 




1 


30 to 34 years 






2 




2 








416 


42 


1 



Total 


20,400 


13, 463 


3,461 


1,904 


1,556 


16 








8,650 

1,218 

857 

651 

1,287 

1,840 

1,408 

1,919 

1,306 

753 

511 


8,635 
1,140 
667 
418 
673 
667 
376 
411 
266 
119 
91 


2 

36 

94 

96 

335 

63« 

591 

868 

516 

203 

82 


4 

42 

95 

135 

254 

482 

371 

375 

110 

31 

5 


1 i 8 






18 and 19 years 




1 


2 

24 

52 

70 

262 

412 

400 

333 






1 


25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 


1 




3 




2 






65 years and over 







222 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO— Continued. 

Fokeign White, Both Sexes. 



Foreign White Males. 



Foreign White Females. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 

husband 

and wife 
by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


559 


207 


221 


63 


68 










27 

12 

11 

7 

41 

59 

45 

128 

126 

57 

46 


27 
12 
10 
, 5 
28 
37 
14 
37 
20 
11 
6 






















1 
2 
8 
13 
24 
65 
68 
26 
14 


















5 
8 
6 
21 

17 
3 
3 






25 to 29 years 


1 
1 
5 
21 
17 
23 



























Total 


449 


169 


185 


56 


39 










19 

8 

7 

6 

34 

47 

34 

108 

112 

40 

34 


19 

8 

7 

4 

28 

32 

13 

30 

17 

7 

4 
































2 
3 
8 
15 
56 
66 
22 
13 










3 

7 
6 
18 
16 
3 
3 




















4 
13 

8 
14 



















Total 


110 


38 


36 


7 


29 










8 

4 

4 

1 

7 

12 

11 

20 

14 

17 

12 


8 
4 
3 
1 






















1 


















5 
5 
9 
9 
2 
4 
1 


2 
1 








5 
1 
7 
3 
4 
2 


1 
1 
1 

8 
9 
9 










3 

1 












65 years and over 











CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



223 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO— Continued. 

Colored, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 

husband 

and wife 
by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


47, 696 


33,885 


5,080 


6,999 


1,699 


33 








21,788 
2,636 
1,814 
1,456 
2,611 
3,974 
2,984 
4,397 
3,165 
1,789 
1,082 


21,762 

2,526 

1,555 

1,073 

1,633 

1,699 

1,001 

1,151 

762 

440 

283 


1 

25 

78 

99 

306 

723 

683 

1,214 

1,066 

600 

285 


16 

74 

179 

276 

659 

1,517 

1,216 

1,754 

864 

338 

106 




9 




4 


7 




2 




5 

10 

33 

83 

276 

472 

408 

408 


3 




3 




2 




1 




2 




1 




3 









Colored Males. 



Colored Females. 



Total 


23, 689 


17,234 


2,554 


3,448 


435 


18 








11,317 

1,237 

874 

664 

1,223 

1,796 

1,426 

2,118 

1,575 

924 

535 


11,312 
1,215 
830 
565 
887 
870 
475 
500 
319 
170 
91 




2 

13 
32 
71 
235 
627 
600 
968 
567 
242 
91 




3 
3 
1 




3 
11 

22 
94 
288 
326 
592 
587 
409 
222 


3 






3 

4 

10 
24 
57 
102 
101 


3 


25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 


3 

1 
1 




1 








2 


65 years and over 


131 





Total 


24,007 


16, 651 


2,526 


3,551 


1,264 


15 








10, 471 

1,399 

940 

792 

1,388 

2,178 

1,558 

2,279 

1,590 

865 

547 


10,450 
1,311 
725 
508 
746 
829 


1 

22 

67 

77 

212 

435 


14 
61 
147 

205 
424 
890 
616 
786 
297 
96 
15 




6 




1 


4 




1 




2 
6 
23 
59 
219 
370 
307 
277 




21 to 24 years 




1 


30 to 34 years. . 


526 357 






651 
443 
270 
192 


622 

479 

191 

63 


1 




1 




1 


65 vears and over 







224 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by aye, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 
Total Population, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


127, 566 


87, 294 


22,573 


10, 428 


7,180 


91 








52, 802 
7,611 


52,738 
7. 385 


5 

125 

361 

521 

1,714 

3,770 

3,746 


2 

92 

228 

426 

1,062 

2, 167 

2.010 


6 
4 
14 

27 

66 

287 

477 

1,409 

1.805 


52 




5 




5,495 ! 4,887 
4,050 i 3,073 
8,096 : 5,251 

11,078 i 4,851 
9,001 , 2,762 

13,029 ; 3,033 
8,493 l 1,771 
4, 928 951 


5 




3 




3 


25 to 29 years 


3 


30 to 34 years 


6 




5, 927 2. 654 


6 




3,705 

1,844 

855 


1,209 


3 




439 I 1.692 


2 


65 vears and over 


2,983 


592 


139 


1,394 


3 



Males. 



Total 

Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years' and over 



62, 750 



27,071 
3,415 
2, 588 
1,786 
3, 958 
5, 071 
4,405 
6,571 
4,153 
2,352 
1,380 



44, 484 



27,039 

3,403 

2, 519 

1,634 

3, 132 

2, 623 

1,425 

1,441 

726 

339 

203 



2 
3 

27 

64 

458 

1, 428 

1,876 

3, 247 

2,210 

1,239 

636 



5, 206 



1 

6 

37 

79 

358 

955 

975 

1,558 

800 

326 

111 



4 
1 
2 

7 
9 
62 
124 
325 
415 
447 
430 



11 



Total . 


64,816 


42, 810 


11, 383 


5,222 


5,354 


47 












25, 731 
4,196 
2, 907 


25, 699 
3,982 
2. 368 


3 

122 

334 

457 

1,256 

2,342 

1,870 

2,680 

1,495 

605 

219 


1 

86 

191 

347 

704 

1,212 

1,035 

1,096 

409 

113 

28 


1 

3 

12 

20 

57 

225 

353 

1,084 

1,390 

1,245 

964 


27 




3 




2 




2, 264 1 . 439 


1 




4,138 
6, 007 
4,596 
6,458 
4,340 
2, 576 
1,603 


2,119 
2,228 
1,337 
1,592 
1,045 
612 
389 


2 






30 to 34 years. . . 


1 




6 




1 




1 


65 years and over 


3 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



225 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ— Continued. 

Native White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


80, 564 


54, V/2 


15, 613 


5,938 


4,787 


54 








33, 406 
4,796 
3,539 
2,540 
5,196 
7,108 
5,760 
8,209 
5,221 
2,976 
1,813 


33, 360 

4,660 

3,118 

1,917 

3,302 

2,954 

1,652 

1,650 

884 

451 

224 


3 

78 

266 

346 

1,249 

2,670 

2,593 

4,099 

2,502 

1,232 

575 


2 

55 

144 

258 

606 

1,282 

1,191 

1,505 

638 

192 

65 




41 




2 

9 

19 

38 

201 

322 

952 

1,196 

1,100 

948 


1 




2 








1 




1 




2 




3 




1 




1 


65 years and over 


1 



Native White Males. 



Total 

Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 vears 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



39, 625 



17, 072 
2,149 
1,676 
1,117 
2,553 
3,236 
2,820 
4,136 
2,586 
1, 425 
855 



27, 943 



17, 051 

2,144 

1,631 

1,029 

2,030 

1,648 

900 

830 

407 

186 

87 



7,553 



2,929 



1 

1 

19 

40 

316 

1,004 

1,270 

2,197 

1,463 

814 

428 



1,176 



1 




3 




24 


2 


44 


4 


200 


7 


538 


45 


577 


72 


898 


211 


444 


271 


150 


274 


50 


290 



Native White Females. 



Total 

Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years . . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



40, 939 



16,334 
2,647 
1,863 
1,423 
2,643 
3,872 
2,940 
4,073 
2,635 
1,551 
958 



26, 229 



16, 309 

2,516 

1,487 

888 

1,272 

1,306 

752 

820 

477 

265 

137 



,060 



2 

77 

247 

306 

933 

1,666 

1,323 

1,902 

1,039 

418 

147 



3,009 



3,611 



1 




52 


2 


120 


7 


214 


15 


406 


31 


744 


156 


614 


250 


607 


741 


194 


925 


42 


826 


16 


658 



8490—00- 



-15 



226 



REPORT OlST THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ— Continued. 

Foreign White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 




1,480 


612 


601 


125 


141 


1 








99 

45 

37 

18 

111 

185 

188 

309 

250 

138 

100 


99 
42 
35 
17 
90 
111 
59 
63 
59 
24 
13 






1. 




3 

2 

1 

13 

56 

102 

184 

142 

65 

33 




1 






.....::...:. 






i 




7 

14 
20 
38 
23 
16 

7 


i 

4 
7 
24 
26 
33 
46 
























65 years and over 


1 



Foreign White Males. 



Total 

Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



1,099 



56 
32 
28 
16 
85 
147 
134 
238 
190 
102 
71 



146 
117 



117 



Foreign White Females. 





381 


158 


141 


8 


73 


1 








43 
13 
9 
2 
26 
38 
54 
71 
60 
36 
29 


43 

10 

8 

1 

17 

13 

15 

17 

21 

10 

3 












3 

1 

1 

8 

20 

34 

38 

25 

7 

4 




























1 
4 
3 
13 
13 
18 
21 






1 
2 
3 
1 
1 






















] 







CONJUGAL CONDITION". 227 

Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ— Continued 
Colored, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


45,522 


32, 510 


6,359 


4,365 


2,252 


36 








19, 297 
2,770 
1,919 
1,492 
2,789 
3,785 
3,053 
4,511 
3,022 
1,814 
1,070 


19, 279 

2,683 

1,734 

1,139 

1,859 

1,786 

1,051 

1,320 

828 

476 

355 


2 

44 

93 

174 

452 

1,044 

1,051 

1,644 

1,061 

547 

247 




5 

2 

5 

8 

27 

82 

148 

433 

583 

559 

400 


11 




37 

84 

168 

449 

871 

799 

1,111 

548 

231 

67 


4 




3 




3 








2 




4 




3 




2 




1 


65 years and over 


1 



Colored Males. 



Total 


22,026 


16,087 


3,177 


2,160 


582 


20 








9,943 

1,234 

884 

653 

1,320 

1,688 

1,451 

2,197 

1,377 

825 

454 


9,932 
1,227 
861 
589 
1,029 
877 
481 
665 
281 
139 
106 


1 

2 

7 

24 

137 

388 

538 

904 

630 

367 

179 




4 

1 


6 




3 
13 
35 
151 

404 
380 
625 
334 
161 
54 


1 




3 




3 

2 

17 

48 

103 

131 

158 

115 


2 




1 




2 




4 


35 to 44 years 






1 


55 to 64 years 




65 years and over 









Colored Females. 



Total 


23,496 


16,423 


3,182 


2,205 


1,670 


16 






Under 15 years 


9,354 

1,536 

1,035 

839 

1,469 

2,097 

1,602 

2,314 

1,645 

989 

616 


9,347 
1,456 
873 
550 
830 
909 
570 
755 
547 
337 
249 


1 

42 

86 

150 

315 

656 

513 

740 

431 

180 

68 




1 

1 

5 

5 

25 

65 

100 

330 

452 

401 

285 


5 




34 

71 

133 

298 

467 

419 

486 

214 

70 

13 


3 


18 and 19 years 






1 




1 


25 to 29 years 














1 








1 



228 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 

Total Population, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


203, 191 


142,864 


30, 957 


20,083 


9,254 


33 








87, 732 

11, 602 

8,413 

6,566 

13, 326 

18, 792 

13, 731 

19,505 

12, 821 

6,760 

3,943 


87, 667 
11,178 
7, 324 
4,991 
8,622 
8,553 
4,590 
6,011 
2,823 
1,263 
842 


8 
179 

503 
651 
2,381 
5,132 
4,947 
7,872 
5,374 
2,720 
1,190 


46 

237 

575 

894 

2,216 

4,726 

3,628 

4,790 

2,087 

667 

217 


1 

5 

7 

28 

103 

378 

565 

1,830 

2,535 

2, 110 

1,692 


10 




3 




4 




2 




4 


25 to 29 years 


3 




1 




2 




2 






65 years and over 


2 



Males. 



Females. 



Total 


101, 957 


73,846 


15,407 


10,044 


2,638 


22 








45,164 
5,305 
4,034 
3,031 
6,625 
9,149 
6,828 

10,000 
6,491 
3,477 
1,863 


45, 141 
6,269 
3,894 
2,703 
5,056 
4,789 
2,427 
2,507 
1,269 
518 
273 


2 

7 

40 

112 

689 

2,103 

2,377 

4,240 

3,147 

1,804 

886 


6 

26 

95 

207 

859 

2,151 

1,888 

2,772 

1,379 

490 

171 


1 
1 
1 

7 

20 
103 
135 
479 
694 
665 
532 


4 




2 




4 




2 




1 




3 




1 




2 




2 








1 







Total 


101, 234 


69,018 


15, 650 


10,039 


6,616 


11 








42, 578 
6, 297 
4,379 
3,535 
6,701 
9,643 
6,903 
9,505 
6,330 
3,283 
2,080 


42, 526 
5,909 
3,430 
2,288 
3,566 
3,764 
2,163 
2,504 
1,554 
745 
569 


6 

172 

463 

539 

1,692 

3,029 

2,570 

3,632 

2,227 

916 

304 


40 

211 

480 

687 

1,357 

2,575 

1,740 

2,018 

708 

177 

46 




6 




4 
6 

21 

83 

276 

430 

1,351 

1,841 

1,445 

1,160 


1 












3 
























1 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 229 

Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF PONCE— Continued. 
Native White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


118,784 


82,443 


20, 803 


9,649 


5,868 


21 








51,776 
6,994 
4,970 
3,809 
7,992 

10, 990 
8,014 

11,033 
7,108 
3,839 
2,259 


51, 729 
6,751 
4,305 
2,872 
5,101 
4,819 
2,357 
2,453 
1,233 
520 
303 


7 

111 

364 

461 

1,696 

3,571 

3,456 

5,255 

3,373 

1,731 

778 


30 

127 

294 

453 

1,129 

2,356 

1,830 

2,171 

906 

267 

86 


1 

3 

5 

22 

63 

243 

371 

1,153 

1,595 

1,321 

1,091 


9 




2 




2 




1 




3 




1 


30 to 34 years 






1 




1 






65 years and over 


1 



Native White Males. 



Total 

Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



59, 282 



26, 534 
3,159 
2,358 
1,719 
3,970 
5,330 
4,042 
5,627 
3,545 
1,931 
1,067 



42, 751 



26, 526 
3,137 
2,279 
1,547 
3,053 
2,733 
1,299 
1,276 
694 
218 



10,004 



1 

4 

27 

66 

479 

1,425 

1,629 

2,768 

1,917 

1,112 

576 



4,877 



2 

16 

49 

98 

421 

1,106 

1,024 

1,284 

615 

194 



1,639 



1 

1 

1 

7 

17 

65 

90 

298 

418 

407 

334 



Native White Females. 



Total 


59,502 


39, 692 


10,799 


4,772 


4,229 


10 








25, 242 
3,835 
2,612 
2,090 
4,022 
5,660 
3,972 
5,406 
3,563 
1,908 
1,192 


25,203 

3,614 

2,026 

1,325 

2,048 

2,086 

1,058 

1,177 

639 

302 

214 


6 

107 

337 

395 

1,217 

2,146 

1,827 

2,487 

1,456 

619 

202 


28 

111 

245 

355 

708 

1,250 

806 

887 

291 

73 

18 




5 




2 

4 

15 

46 

178 

281 

856 

1,177 

914 

757 


1 












3 
























1 



230 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF PONCE— Continued. 
Foreign White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


2,403 


1,053 


926 


197 


222 


5 








120 

53 

66 

62 

210 

342 

337 

512 

390 

207 

114 


120 

51 

58 

41 

166 

198 

152 

146 

80 

27 

14 












1 

8 

7 

34 

103 

137 

281 

215 

102 

38 


1 














3 
9 
33 
36 
51 
36 
23 
5 


1 

1 
6 
11 
33 
68 
55 
57 










2 




1 




1 




1 






65 years and over 







Foreign White Males. 



Foreign White Females. 



Total 


1,886 


849 


729 


189 


114 


5 








59 

44 

49 

36 

163 

276 

275 

425 

318 

162 

79 


59 

43 

49 

32 

141 

171 

134 

120 

65 

23 

12 














1 






18 and 19 years 








1 

13 
71 
99 
235 
186 
88 
36 


3 
9 
29 
34 
51 
35 
22 
5 














3 
7 

18 
31 
29 
26 


2 




1 




1 




1 






65 years and over 









517 


204 


197 


8 


108 










61 
9 
17 
16 
47 
66 
62 
87 
72 
45 
35 


61 

8 

9 

9 

25 

27 

18 

26 

15 

4 

2 












1 

8 

6 

21 

32 

38 

46 

29 

14 

2 




















1 
1 
3 
4 
15 
27 
26 
31 












4 
2 














1 
1 

















CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



231 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex; race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OP PONCE-Continued. 

Colored, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


82,004 


59, 368 


9,228 


10, 237 


3,164 


7 








35,836 
4,555 
3,377 
2,705 
5,124 
7,460 
5,380 
7,960 
5,323 
2,714 
1,570 


35, 818 
4,376 
2,961 
2,078 
3,355 
3,536 
2,081 
2,412 
1,510 
716 
525 


1 

67 

131 

183 

651 

1,458 

1,354 

2,336 

1,786 

887 

374 


16 

109 

281 

438 

1,078 

2,337 

1,762 

2,568 

1,145 

377 

126 




1 




2 

2 

6 

39 

129 

183 

644 

882 

734 

544 


1 




2 




1 




1 






















65 years and over 


1 



Coloeed Males. 



Colored Females. 



Total 


40, 789 


30, 246 


4,674 


4,978 


885 


6 








18, 561 
2,102 
1,627 
1,276 
2,492 
3,543 
2,511 
3,948 
2,628 
1,384 
717 


18,556 

2,089 

1,566 

1,124 

1,862 

1,885 

994 

1,111 

610 

277 

172 


1 

3 

13 

46 

197 

607 

649 

1,237 

1,044 

604 

274 


4 

9 

46 

106 

429 

1,016 

830 

1,437 

729 

274 

98 










1 






2 






1 




3 
35 
38 
163 
245 
229 
172 


1 






















65 years and over 


1 



Total 


41, 215 


29,122 


4,554 


5,259 


2,279 


1 








17, 275 
2,453 
1,750 
1,429 
2,632 
3,917 
2,869 
4,012 
2,695 
1,330 
853 


17, 262 

2,287 

1,395 

954 

1,493 

1,651 

1,087 

1,301 

900 

439 

353 




12 
100 
235 
332 
649 

1,321 
932 

1,131 

416 

103 

28 




1 




64 
118 
138 
454 
851 
705 
1,099 
742 
283 
100 


2 

2 

5 

36 

94 

145 

481 

637 

605 

372 
















25 to 29 years 



























232 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

CITY OF PONCE. 
Total Population, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


27, 952 


19,986 


3,918 


2,427 


1,615 


6 








9,096 
1,762 
1,410 

886 
2,537 
3,136 
2,317 
3,194 
1,995 
1,094 

525 


9,094 

1,700 

1,239 

716 

1,835 

1,785 

1,105 

1,250 

737 

331 

194 




2 

18 

75 

96 

323 

570 

462 

528 

234 

93 

26 








41 

94 

71 

361 

703 

632 

1,044 

601 

297 

74 


2 

2 

3 

17 

76 

118 

371 

422 

373 

231 


1 












1 




2 


30 to 34 years 






1 




1 






65 years and over 







Males. 



Total 


13, 197 


9,674 


1,966 


1,212 


339 


6 






Under 15 vears 


4,547 

796 

632 

364 

1,231 

1,518 

1,089 

1,511 

863 

470 

176 


4,547 
794 
616 
335 

1,009 
895 
525 
542 
255 
106 
50 












1 

6 

9 

101 

312 

299 

599 

386 

198 

55 






1 


18 and 19 years 


10 

20 
117 
288 
242 
306 
140 
69 
20 














3 
21 
23 
63 
81 
97 
51 


1 




2 








1 




1 






65 years and over 









Females. 



Total 

Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



14, 755 



4,549 

966 

778 

522 

1,306 

1,618 

1,228 

1,683 

1, 132 

624 

349 



10, 312 



4,547 
906 
623 
381 
826 
890 
580 
708 
482 
225 
144 



1,952 



62 
260 
391 
333 
445 
215 
99 
19 



1,215 



2 

18 

65 

76 

206 

282 

220 

222 

94 

24 

6 



1,276 



2 

2 

3 

14 

65 
95 
308 
341 
276 
180 



CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



233 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
CITY OF PONCE— Continued. 
Native White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


14,268 


10, 060 


2,305 


957 


946 










4,990 

957 

740 

444 

1,313 

1,526 

1,107 

1,535 

915 

513 

228 


4,990 
922 
636 
346 
944 
852 
460 
501 
251 
111 
47 












24 

66 

51 

234 

415 

380 

601 

324 

166 

44 


10 

36 

45 

127 

216 

196 

202 

88 

26 

11 


1 

2 

2 

8 

43 

71 

231 

252 

210 

126 




18 and 19 years 






21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 


















65 years and over 







Native White Males. 



Total 

Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years. 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



6,764 


5,049 


2,515 


2,515 


444 


443 


339 


330 


175 


164 


650 


536 


734 


433 


530 


232 


699 


239 


402 


106 


205 


39 


71 


12 



1,065 



1 

3 

4 

65 

181 

169 

317 

193 

99 

33 



6 

7 

47 

108 

119 

109 

60 

18 



168 



Native White Females. 



Total 

Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



7,504 


6,011 


2,475 


2,475 


513 


479 


401 


306 


269 


182 


663 


408 


792 


419 


577 


228 


836 


262 


513 


145 


308 


72 


157 


35 



1,240 



23 

63 

47 

169 

234 

211 

284 

131 

67 

11 



475 



10 
30 
38 
80 
108 
77 
93 
28 



778 



1 

2 

2 

6 

31 

61 

197 

209 

161 

108 



234 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, ran:, and nativity — Continued. 
CITY OF PONCE— Continued. 
Foreign White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 
together as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


1,182 


540 


451 


62 


125 


4 








88 

28 

34 

21 

109 

169 

161 

251 

172 

106 

43 


88 
28 
28 
17 
79 
93 
77 
77 
36 
12 
5 






















6 

3 

27 

55 

65 

137 

98 

51 

9 








20 years 


1 
2 
16 
12 
14 
10 
7 






21 to 24 years 


i 

3 

7 
22 
27 
36 
29 




25 to 29 years 


2 


30 to 34 years 






1 




1 






65 years and over 











Foreign White Males. 



Foreign White Females. 



Total 


847 


397 


335 


56 


65 


4 






Under 15 years 


41 

24 

21 

13 

78 

128 

120 

189 

132 

78 

23 


41 
24 
21 
12 
66 
77 
61 
58 
24 
10 
3 




















18 and 19 years 










20 years 




1 

2 
13 
10 
14 
9 
7 






21 to 24 years 


10 
35 
45 
106 

87 

44 

8 






25 to 29 years 


1 
4 
10 
11 
17 
12 


2 


30 to 34 years 






1 




1 






65 years and over 











Total 


335 


143 


116 


6 


70 








Under 15 years 


47 
4 
13 
8 
31 
41 
41 
62 
40 
28 
20 


47 
4 
7 
5 
13 
16 
16 
19 
12 
2 
2 




1 


15 to 17 vears 






1 


18 and 19 years 


6 

3 

17 

20 

20 

31 

11 

7 

1 






20 years 






21 to 24 years 




1 
2 
3 
12 
16 
19 
17 




25 to 29 years 


3 
2 




30 to 34 years 




35 to 44 years 




45 to 64 years 


1 




55 to 64 years 




65 years and over 















CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



235 



Tablk XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, mid nativity — Continued. 

CITY OF PONCE— Continued. 

Colored, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


12,502 


9,386 


1, 162 


1,408 


544 


2 








4,018 

777 

636 

421 

1,115 

1,441 

1,049 

1,408 

908 

475 

254 


4,016 
750 
575 
353 
812 
840 
568 
672 
450 
208 
142 




2 

8 

39 

50 

194 

338 

254 

312 

136 

60 

15 








17 

22 

17 

100 

233 

187 

306 

179 

80 

21 


1 


1 








1 

8 

30 

40 

118 

143 

127 

76 






1 


25 to 29 years 




















65 years and over 







Colored Males. 



Total 


5,586 


4,228 


566 


674 


116 


2 








Under 15 years 


1,991 
328 
272 
176 
503 
656 
439 
623 
329 
:87 
82 


1,991 
327 
265 
159 
407 
385 
232 
245 
125 
57 
35 














1 




3 1 4 

5 ' 12 

26 68 

96 167 






20 years 








1 
8 
9 
19 
27 
31 
21 


1 


25 to 29 years 




30 to 34 years 


85 

176 

106 

55 

14 


113 

183 
71 
44 
12 




35 to 44 years 




46 to 54 years 




55 to 64 years 













Colored Females. 



Total 

Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



6,916 


5,158 


2,027 


2,025 


449 


423 


364 


310 


246 


194 


612 


405 


785 


455 


610 


336 


785 


427 


579 


325 


288 


151 


172 


107 



596 



17 
19 
12 
74 
137 
102 
130 
73 
25 
7 



734 



35 
38 
126 
171 
141 
129 
65 
16 
3 



1 

7 
22 
31 
99 
116 
96 
55 



23fi 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, rare, and nativity — Continued. 

CITY OF SAN JUAN. 

Total Population, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


32,048 


22,847 


4,594 


2,801 


1,804 


2 








10,091 
2,168 
1,691 
1,028 
3,013 
3,567 
2,569 
3,698 
2,198 
1,308 
717 


10,088 

2, 099 

1,541 

861 

2,208 

2,045 

1,225 

1,377 

711 

450 

242 


2 
43 
74 
80 
377 
798 
748 
1,273 
730 
353 
116 


1 
23 

72 
85 
405 
648 
480 
667 
285 
105 
30 








2 

4 

2 

23 

76 

116 

381 

472 

399 

329 


1 
































1 







Males. 



Females. 



Total 


15, 100 


11,088 


2,313 


1,397 


301 


1 










4,926 

971 

842 

469 

1,502 

1,754 

1,275 

1,708 

929 

504 

220 


4,925 

966 

827 

434 

1,248 

1,100 

630 

553 

234 

116 

55 


1 








3 
9 

22 
151 
316 
236 
378 
183 
78 
21 


2 






6 

13 
99 

323 
384 
719 
447 
238 
83 












4 
15 

25 
58 
65 
71 
61 








30 to 34 years 














1 









Total 


16, 948 


11, 759 


2,281 


1,404 


1,503 


1 








5,165 

1,197 

849 

559 

1,511 

1,813 

1,294 

1,990 

1,269 

804 

497 


5,163 
1,133 
714 
427 
960 
945 
595 
824 
477 
334 
187 


1 
43 
68 
67 
278 
475 
364 
654 
283 
116 
33 


1 

20 

63 

63 

254 

332 

244 

289 

102 

27 

9 










1 




4 

2 

19 

61 

91 

323 

407 

328 

268 








21 to 24 years 




25 to 29 years 




















65 years and over 













CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



237 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by aye, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

CITY OF SAN JUAN— Continued. 

Native White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


12, 391 


8,820 


2,095 


676 


799 


1 








4,401 
912 
654 
371 

1,152 

1,260 
898 

1,272 
737 
481 
263 


4,399 
879 
583 
315 
836 
662 
364 
415 
179 
118 
70 


1 

24 

39 

42 

189 

397 

353 

537 

318 

143 

52 


1 

7 

31 

14 

115 

155 

123 

157 

51 

17 

5 








1 
1 


1 












12 
46 
58 
163 
189 
203 
136 








30 to 34 years 

























Native White Males. 



Total 

Under 15 years . . . 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years . . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



5,541 


4,222 


902 


2,142 


2,141 


1 


415 
310 


413 
304 




2 


160 


151 


6 


553 


472 


39 


551 


334 


143 


413 


175 


166 


500 


139 


253 


268 


53 


165 


164 


30 


95 


65 


10 


32 



308 



109 



3 
9 
12 
21 
18 
26 
19 



Native White Females. 



Total 


6,850 


4,598 


1,193 


368 


690 


1 






Under 15 years 


2,259 
497 
344 
211 
599 
709 
485 
772 
469 
307 
198 


2,258 
466 
279 
164 
364 
328 
189 
276 
126 
88 
60 




1 
6 
27 
11 
76 
90 
63 
70 
19 
4 
1 








24 

37 

36 

150 

254 

187 

284 

153 

48 

20 




1 


18 and 19 years 


1 




20 years 




21 to 24 years 


9 
37 
46 
142 
171 
167 
117 
























65 vears and over 









238 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, arid nativity — Continued. 

CITY OF SAN JUAN— Continued. 

Foreign White, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


2,872 


1,612 


956 


147 


156 


1 








209 
123 


209 

122 

146 

63 

243 

280 

219 

211 

74 

27 

18 






1 




1 

8 

8 

46 

118 

153 

332 

189 

76 

25 








154 








74 
299 
430 
407 
619 
328 
148 

81 


3 
10 
29 
30 
44 
23 
7 
1 










3 
5 
32 
42 
37 
37 


















1 


65 years and over 







Foreign White Males. 



Total 


2,190 


1,290 


699 


139 


61 


1 








112 
105 
130 

58 
242 
352 
328 
462 
247 
106 

48 


112 

105 

129 

64 

220 

254 

192 

149 

49 

16 

10 






















1 
1 

13 
71 
106 
258 
160 
67 
22 










3 
9 

27 
27 
43 

22 
7 
1 












25 to 29 years 








3 
12 
16 
15 
15 














1 


65 years and over 







Foreign White Females. 



Total 


682 


322 


257 


8 


95 










97 
18 
24 
16 
67 
78 
79 
157 
81 
42 
33 


97 
17 
17 

9 
23 
26 
27 
62 
25 
11 

8 












1 

7 

7 

33 

47 

47 

74 

29 

9 

3 


























1 
2 
3 
1 
1 








3 

2 
20 
26 
22 
22 




















65 years and over 











CONJUGAL CONDITION. 



239 



Table XV. — Conjugal condition, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

CITY OF SAN JUAN— Continued. 

Colored, Both Sexes. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living 

together as 

husband 

and wife 

by mutual 

consent. 


Widowed. 


Unknown. 


Total 


16, 785 


12,415 


1,543 


1,978 


849 










5,481 

1,133 

883 

583 

1,562 

1,877 

1,264 

1,807 

1,133 

689 

373 


5,480 

1,098 

812 

483 

1,129 

1,103 

642 

751 

458 

305 

154 


1 

18 

27 

30 

142 

283 

242 

404 

223 

134 

39 










16 

41 

68 

280 

464 

327 

466 

211 

81 

24 


1 

3 

2 

11 

27 

53 

186 

241 

169 

156 












21 to 24 years 

































Colored Males. 



Total 


7,369 


5,576 


712 


950 


131 










2,672 
451 
402 
251 
707 
851 
534 
746 
414 
234 
107 


2,672 
448 
394 
229 
556 
512 
263 
265 
132 
70 
35 














2 

5 

16 

103 

224 

149 

248 

129 

58 

16 


1 






3 
6 

47 
109 
112 
208 
122 
76 
29 












1 
6 

10 
25 
31 
30 
27 




25 to 29 years 





























Colored Females. 



Total 

Under 15 years... 

15 to 17 years 

18 and 19 years. . . 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



9,416 



2,809 
682 
481 
332 
855 

1,026 
730 

1,061 
719 
455 
266 



6,839 



2,j 



650 
418 
254 
573 
591 
379 
486 
326 
235 
119 



1 

18 

24 

24 

95 

174 

130 

196 

101 

58 

10 



1,028 



14 

36 

52 

177 

240 

178 

218 

82 

23 



718 



3 
2 
10 
21 
43 
161 
210 
139 
129 



240 



REPOKT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVI. — Illegitimate children, by age, sex, race, and nativity. 
PORTO RICO. 



Sex, race, and nativity. 


All ages. 


Under 5 
years. 


5 to 9 
years. 


10 to 14 
years. 


15 to 19 
years. 


20 to 24 
years. 


25 years 
and over. 




148, 605 


55,445 


42,648 


27,335 


13,076 


5,711 


4,390 








75, 907 
72, 698 


28,168 
27, 277 


21,637 
21,011 


14,344 
12, 991 


6,406 
6,670 


3,142 
2,569 


2,210 




2,180 








66, 831 


26, 419 


19,286 


12, 093 


5,321 


2,246 


1,466 








34, 138 
32, 693 


13, 332 
13, 087 


9,808 
9,478 


6,270 
5,823 


2,629 
2,692 


1,323 
923 


776 




690 








24 


6 


2 


2 


6 


4 


4 








17 

7 


6 


2 


1 

1 


4 
2 


1 
3 


3 




1 












81, 750 


29, 020 


23, 360 


15,240 


7,749 


3,461 


2,920 








41,752 
39, 998 


14, 830 
14, 190 


11, 827 
11, 533 


8,073 
7,167 


S,773 
3,976 


1,818 
1,643 


1,431 




1,489 







DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 





9,320 


3,374 


2,755 


1,748 


815 


367 


261 








4,746 

4,574 


1,718 
1,656 


1,398 
1,357 


899 
849 


392 
423 


208 
159 


131 




130 








6,407 


2,410 


1,951 


1,172 


519 


220 


135 








3,303 
3,104 


1,229 
1,181 


1,017 
934 


615 
557 


246 
273 


130 
90 


66 




69 
























































































2,913 


964 


804 


576 


296 


147 


126 








1,443 
1,470 


489 
475 


381 
423 


284 
292 


146 
150 


78 
69 


65 




61 







DEPARTMENT OP ARECIBO. 





18,754 


7,067 


5,456 


3,466 


1,638 


671 


456 








9,508 
9,246 


3, 558 
3,509 


2,722 
2,734 


1,789 
1,677 


796 
842 


380 
291 


263 




193 








12, 153 


4,811 


3,543 


2,158 


987 


404 


250 








6,129 
6,024 


2,400 
2,411 


1,752 
1,791 


1,119 
1,039 


473 
514 


236 
168 


149 




101 








1 




1 
























1 




1 






































Colored 


(i, 600 


2, 256 


1,912 


1,308 


651 


267 


206 




3,378 
3,222 


1,158 
1,098 


969 
943 


670 
638 


323 
328 


144 
123 


114 




92 







ILLEGITIMATE CHILDREN. 



241 



Table XVI.— Illegitimate children, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Sex, race, and nativity. 


All ages. 


Under 5 
years. 


5 to 9 
years. 


10 to 14 
years. 


15 to 19 

years. 


20 to 24 
years. 


25 years 
and over. 




24,759 


9,252 


7,049 


4,447 


2,153 


1,024 


834 








12, 577 
12, 182 


4,701 
4,551 


3, 525 
3,524 


2,343 
2,104 


1,059 
1,094 


515 
509 


434 




400 






Native white 


7,741 


3,103 


2,202 


1,387 


572 


280 


197 




3,949 
3,792 


1,559 
1,544 


1,123 
1,079 


718 
669 


292 
280 


148 
132 


109 




88 






Foreign white 


4 


1 






2 


1 












2 
2 


1 






1 
1 












1 














Colored 


17, 014 


6,148 


4,847 


3,060 


1,579 


743 


637 




8,626 
8,388 


3,141 
3,007 


2,402 
2,445 


1,625 
1,435 


766 

813 


367 

376 


325 




312 







DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 





19, 743 


7,767 


5,911 


3,489 


1,522 


606 


448 








10, 174 
9,569 


3,935 
3,832 


3,085 
2,826 


1,866 
1, 623 


745 

777 


323 
283 


220 




228 








7,603 


3,082 


2,262 


1,353 


554 


205 


147 








3, 959 
3,644 


1,559 
1,523 


1,187 
1,075 


718 
635 


281 
273 


125 
80 


89 




58 








1 












1 


































1 












1 


















12, 139 


4,685 


3,649 


2,136 


968 


401 


300 








6,215 
5,924 


2, 376 
2,309 


1,898 
1,751 


1,148 
988 


464 
504 


198 
203 


131 




169 









18, 127 


6,927 


5,188 


3,341 


1,534 


647 


490 








9,338 
8,789 


3,539 
3,388 


2, 641 

2,547 


1,783 
1,558 


765 
769 


350 
297 


260 




230 








6,070 


2,466 


1,733 


1,092 


446 


205 


128 








3,140 
2,930 


1,282 
1,184 


868 
865 


571 
521 


232 
214 


118 

87 


69 




59 








3 


1 




1 






1 














3 


1 




1 






1 






























12, 054 


4,460 


3,455 


2,248 


1,088 


442 


361 








6,195 
5,859 


2, 256 
2,204 


1,773 
1,682 


1,211 
1,037 


533 

555 


232 
210 


190 




171 







8490—00- 



-16 



242 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OE PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVI. — Illegitimate children, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Sex, race, and nativity. 


All ages. 


Under 5 
years. 


5 to 9 
years. 


10 to 14 
years. 


15 to 19 
years. 


20 to 24 
years. 


25 years 
and over. 




1(5,111 


5,675 


4,554 


3,082 


1,606 


687 


507 








8, 267 
7,844 


2, 915 
2, 760 


2,337 
2,217 


1,595 
1,487 


779 
827 


396 
291 


245 




262 








8,218 


3,092 


2,334 


1, 568 


739 


305 


180 








4,221 

3,997 


1,588 
1,504 


1,189 
1,145 


807 
761 


356 
383 


184 
121 


97 




83 








5 


3 








2 
















3 
2 


3 




















2 


















7,888 


2,580 


2,220 


1,514 


867 


380 


327 








4,043 
3,845 


1,324 
1,256 


1,148 
1,072 


788 
726 


423 
444 


212 

168 


148 




179 







DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



CITY OF PONCE. 





34, 459 


13,017 


9,925 


6,403 


2,908 


1,262 


944 








17, 746 
16, 713 


6,643 
6,374 


5,040 
4,885 


3, 385 
3,018 


1,456 
1,452 


756 
506 


466 




478 








16, 231 


6,577 


4,646 


2, 900 


1,265 


509 


334 








8,270 
7,961 


3, 301 
3,276 


2, 359 
2, 287 


1,498 
1,402 


629 
636 


320 
189 


163 




171 








6 




1 


1 


2 


1 


1 










5 
1 




1 




2 


1 


1 






1 


















18, 222 


6,440 


5, 278 


3, 502 


1,641 


752 


609 








9, 471 
8,751 


3,342 
3,098 


2, 680 
2,598 


1,887 
1,615 


825 
816 


435 
317 


302 




307 









3, 851 


1,191 


956 


774 


460 


235 


235 








1,881 
1,970 


594 
697 


477 
479 


384 
390 


217 
243 


111 
124 


98 




137 








1, 547 


533 


407 


316 


156 


80 


55 








754 
793 


261 
272 


204 
203 


152 
164 


77 
79 


40 
40 


20 




35 






Foreign white 


1 












1 
















Males 


1 












1 


Females 
































2,303 


658 


549 


458 


304 


155 


179 








1,126 
1,177 


333 
325 


273 

276 


232 
226 


140 

164 


71 

84 


77 




102 







STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



243 



Table XVI. — Illegitimate children, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
CITY OF SAN JUAN. 



Sex, race, and nativity. 


All ages. 


Under 5 
years. 


5 to 9 

years. 


10 to 14 
years. 


15 to 19 
years. 


20 to 24 
years. 


25 years 
and over. 




3,481 


1,175 


854 


585 


440 


212 


215 








1,670 
1,811 


565 
610 


412 
442 


300 
285 


197 
243 


103 
109 


93 




122 








861 


345 


208 


147 


83 


38 


40 








413 
448 


153 
192 


109 
99 


72 

75 


43 
40 


22 
16 


14 




26 








3 


1 






2 


















2 
1 


1 






1 
1 






























2,617 


829 


646 


438 


355 


174 


175 








1,255 
1,362 


411 

418 


303 
343 


228 
210 


153 
202 


81 
93 


79 




96 







Table XVII. — School attendance, literacy, and superior education. 
PORTO RICO. 



Department. 



Aguadilla. 
Arecibo . . . 
Bayamon . 
Guayama . 
Humacao . 
Mayaguez . 



99, 645 
162, 308 
160,046 
111,986 

88, 501 

127, 566 

Ponce ! 203, 191 



Total 
popula- 
tion. 



Porto Rico 953, 243 



Under ten 
years of age. 



0J43 



878 
1,257 
2,312 
1,258 

948 
1,629 
2, 181 



10, 463 



23 
«2 



30, 460 
50, 219 
46, 821 
34, 978 
27,014 
34,885 
59, 109 



283, 486 



Ten years of age and over. 



a" 3 



1,231 
2,111 
2, 895 
1,992 
1,455 
2,675 
3,390 



15, 749 



~ S if 

03 * ** 
O 



509, 198 



a s o 
o 



1,161 
1,947 
3,786 
1,331 
1,085 
2,562 
3, 508 



15,3*0 



«3 S 
oj a 

Q 03 



9,007 
14, 715 
24, 747 
12, 149 

8,734 
20, 628 
27, 280 



117, 260 



55 

23 
726 

25 
300 

66 
212 



1,407 



Superior 
education. 



134 
348 

1,375 
350 
400 

1,531 
907 



5,045 



99, 511 
161,960 
158, 671 
111,636 

88, 101 
126, 035 
202, 284 



948, 198 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



District. 



Total 
popula- 
tion. 



Under ten 
years of age. 






*g 



Ten years of age and over. 



"2 "3 

a o 



a o-> > 



d aJ 
o3 cS« 
3> a f 

C S o 
03 42 S 
O 



os a 

O o3 



Superior 
education. 



Aguada 10, 581 

Aguadilla 17,830 

Isabela 14,888 

Lares : 20, 883 

Moca 12,410 

Rincon 6,641 

San Sebastian i 16, 412 



302 
114 
158 
79 
26 
101 



3,353 
4,976 
4,570 
6,360 
3,990 
2, 221 
4,990 



123 
349 
174 
224 
101 
64 
196 



107 
349 
214 
176 
94 
57 
164 



650 
2,703 
1,233 
1,887 
817 
313 
1,404 



The department . 99, 645 



30,460 



1,231 



56, 853 



1,161 



9,007 



10, 575 
17, 770 
14, 879 
20, 849 
12, 404 
6,636 
16, 398 



99, 511 



244 



REPORT on the CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVII. — School attendance, literacy, and superior education — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARECTBO. 





Total 
popula- 
tion. 


Under ten 
years of age. 


Ten years of age and over. 


Superior 
education. 


District. 


m 

c o 


it 

03 
O O 

a <° 




5(3 . 
w Oj'g 


■d a <u 

oS oS.tJ 
o> o ^ 

5<flB 

O 


■a . 
°s£ 

oi C 
U oS 


1 




d 




36, 910 
9,357 
10, 887 
18, 115 
10, 449 
13, 989 
11,309 
7,432 
43, 860 


481 
47 
53 
92 
116 
135 
133 
66 
134 


10, 236 
2,948 
3,417 
6,069 
3,322 
3,971 
3,796 
2,279 

14, 181 


678 
123 
127 
126 
139 
338 
246 
147 
187 


20, 599 
5, 217 
6,223 

10,421 
5,942 
7,887 
6,265 
4,032 

26, 450 


599 
124 
103 

87 
111 
270 
117 

95 
441 


4,311 
898 
963 

1,310 
818 

1,387 
752 
813 

3,463 


6 

1 

10 
1 
1 

4 


. 148 
9 
61 
12 
10 
54 
9 
7 
38 


36, 762 




9,348 




10, 826 




18, 103 


Hatillo 


10, 439 




13, 935 




11,300 




7,425 




43, 822 






The department . 


162, 308 


1,257 


50, 219 


2,111 


92, 036 


1,947 


14, 715 


23 


348 


161,960 



DEPARTMENT OP BAYAMON. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



19, 940 


212 


5,951 


283 


10, 704 


318 


2,456 


16 


63 


11,965 


86 


3,815 


122 


6,528 


260 


1,149 


5 


21 


11,508 


117 


4,012 


156 


6,441 


122 


660 




4 


3,804 


43 


1,137 


64 


2,111 


46 


394 


9 


16 


12, 522 


172 


4,168 


291 


6,662 


298 


927 


4 


63 


8,101 


53 


2,576 


92 


4,856 


97 


402 


25 


13 


12, 365 


102 


4,186 


201 


6,524 


163 


1,172 


17 


40 


13, 760 


155 


4,234 


206 


7,184 


241 


1, 722 


18 


71 


32, 048 


1,028 


5,582 


959 


9, 252 


1,785 


12, 846 


596 


971 


7,908 


57 


2,772 


99 


4,349 


63 


565 


3 


13 


4,030 


61 


1,214 


83 


2,058 


125 


488 


1 


10 


5, 683 


49 


2,083 


54 


2,893 


64 


517 


23 


29 


6,107 


59 


1,907 


85 


3,627 


68 


460 


1 


24 


10, 305 


118 


3,184 


200 


5,670 


136 


989 


8 


37 


160, 046 


2, 312 


46, 821 


2, 895 


78, 759 


3,786 


24, 747 


726 


1,375 



19, 877 

11,944 

11,504 

3,788 

12, 459 

8,088 

12, 325 

13, 689 

31,077 

7,895 

4,020 

5, 654 

6,083 

10, 268 



158, 671 



DEPARTMENT OP GUAYAMA. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department . 



7,977 
4,867 

19, 857 

14,442 
7,552 
8,249 

12, 749 
8,700 
8,429 
5, 731 

13, 433 



111, 986 



41 

115 

207 

194 

99 

79 

272 

54 

63 

63 

91 



1,258 



2,712 
1,225 
6,124 
4,218 
2,361 
2,700 
3,442 
3,016 
2,720 
1,750 
4,710 



34,978 



130 
169 
354 
286 
93 
178 
365 
109 
117 
103 



1,992 



4,405 
2,519 
10, 338 
7,628 
4,308 
4,659 
6,350 
4,704 
4,607 
3,224 
7,511 



60, 253 



351 
195 
51 
54 
209 
87 
82 
40 
85 



1,331 



600 

749 

2, 481 

1,921 

640 

578 

2,110 

730 

832 

561 

947 



12, 149 



19 

24 

30 

45 

1 

3 

112 

18 

16 

57 

25 



350 



7,958 
4,843 

19, 827 

14, 397 
7,551 
8,246 

12, 637 
8,682 
8,413 
5,674 

13, 408 



111,636 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department . 



16, 782 


197 


5,277 


367 


8,495 


279 


2,163 


4 


63 


14, 313 


254 


4,018 


366 


7,496 


184 


1,789 


206 


203 


6, 221 


58 


1,872 


137 


3,682 


73 


399 




15 


10, 873 


85 


3,496 


110 


6,187 


88 


906 


1 


39 


11,163 


49 


3,468 


82 


6,681 


90 


707 


86 


9 


8,602 


37 


2,904 


66 


5,000 


46 


649 




9 


6,642 


150 


1,745 


162 


3,288 


176 


1,119 


2 


22 


13, 905 


118 


4,234 


165 


8,136 


149 


1,102 


1 


40 


88, 501 


948 


27, 014 


1,455 


48, 965 


1,085 


8,734 


300 


400 



16,719 
14,110 
6, 206 
10,834 
11, 154 
8,593 
6, 620 
13, 865 



88, 101 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



245 



Table XVII. — School attendance, literacy, and superior education — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 





Total 
popula- 
tion. 


Under ten 
years of age. 


Ten years 


of age 


and over. • 


Superior 
education. 


District. 


■a 
s 

'g'S 

a o 

< 


. * o 
o O 

P2 


a o 


Can neither 
read nor 
write. 


•0 B <p 

o3 o3 S 

a s o 
o 


03.2 

org 
B>d 

o3 fl 

o * 


•6 

1 
O 


0) 


6 




13, 311 

16, 154 

3,215 

8,789 

11,279 

8,312 

35, 700 

15,187 

10, 560 

20, 246 


166 

169 

30 

84 

52 

24 

720 

501 

102 

282 


3,939 
4,629 
898 
2,647 
3,390 
2,416 
8,471 
2,717 
3,199 
5,296 


225 
360 

44 
140 
113 

49 
1,185 
717 
166 
393 


7,313 

8,292 
1,725 
4,713 
6,337 
4,836 

15, 481 
h,6kl 
5,611 

10, 813 


211 
359 

69 
117 
103 

41 
1,118 
789 
142 
402 


1,455 
2,341 

428 
1,073 
1,282 

940 
8,711 
5,819 
1,338 
3,060 


2 

4 

21 

15 

2 

6 

14 

3 

2 


245 
49 
6 
36 
69 
29 
813 
585 
112 
172 


13, 066 




16, 105 




3,209 




8,753 




11,210 




8,283 




34, 887 


City of Mayaguez . . . 


U, 602 
10, 448 




20, 074 






The department . 


127, 566 


1,629 


34, 885 


2,675 


65, 121 


2,562 


20, 628 


66 


1,531 


126, 035 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



19,484 


17 


6,064 


54 


11, 329 


128 


1,888 


4 


160 


8,596 


91 


2,636 


101 


4,549 


120 


1,071 


28 


10 


8,103 


91 


2,698 


123 


4,339 


109 


743 




11 


1 1,845 


88 


5,088 


140 


8,355 


225 


944 


5 


45 


15, 144 


183 


5,043 


329 


7,672 


223 


1,689 


5 


69 


9, 540 


76 


2,943 


99 


5,382 


87 


952 


1 


20 


27, 896 


192 


8,638 


331 


15, 943 


307 


2,474 


11 


128 


12, 129 


62 


3,821 


183 


6,763 


124 


1,129 


47 


106 


55, 477 


1,014 


13,023 


1,458 


25, 590 


1,746 


12, 539 


107 


360 


■ 2,7, 952 


80S 


5,171 


1,097 


9,796 


1, 255 


9, 779 


51 


260 


4,858 


90 


1,396 


149 


2,391 


135 


696 


1 


47 


27, 119 


277 


7,759 


423 


15, 198 


304 


3,155 


3 


51 


203, 191 


2,181 


59, 109 


3,390 


107, 511 


3,508 


27, 280 


212 


907 



19, 424 
8,586 
8,092 
14, 800 
15, 075 
9,520 
27, 768 
12, 023 
55,117 
27,692 
4,811 
27, 068 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy. 

PORTO RICO. 



Age period. 



Total population, both sexes 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total males . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Total. 


Can neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read 

but can not 

write. 


Can read 
and write. 


659, 294 


509, 498 


15, 380 


134, 416 


124, 353 


98, 755 


3,395 


22, 203 


93, 148 


69, 645 


2,873 


20, 630 


88, 475 


64, 512 


2,089 


21,874 


84, 265 


63, 768 


1,783 


18, 714 


64, 317 


49, 417 


1,364 


13, 536 


91, 802 


71, 369 


1,851 


18, 582 


59, 268 


47, 868 


1,098 


10, 302 


33, 716 


27, 736 


589 


5,391 


19, 950 


16,428 


338 


3,184 


322, 567 


239, 685 


5, 133 


77, 749 


65, 112 


50, 946 


1,515 


12, 651 


42,919 


31, 817 


972 


10, 130 


41,664 


28,657 


665 


12, 342 


39, 469 


27, 958 


542 


10, 969 


31, 365 


22, 698 


375 


8,292 


46,430 


34, 092 


543 


11,795 


29, 578 


22, 835 


302 


6,441 


16, 758 


13,311 


142 


3,305 


9,272 


7,371 


77 


1,824 



246 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 

PORTO RICO— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total. 



Can neither 

read nor 

write. 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



Can read 
and write. 



Total females . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to til years 

65 years and over 



Native white, both sexes 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Native white males . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Native white females . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Foreign white, both sexes 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years.. 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Foreign white males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



336, 727 



59, 241 
50, 229 
46, 811 
44,796 
32, 952 
45, 372 
29, 690 
16, 958 
10, 678 



398, 070 



75, 638 
56, 800 
53, 983 
50, 909 
39, 317 
55, 047 
34, 724 
19, 907 
11,745 



193, 669 



39, 534 
25, 862 
25, 214 
23, 726 
19, 155 
27, 790 
17, 252 
9,753 
5, 383 



204, 401 



36, 104 
30, 938 
28, 769 
27, 183 
20, 162 
27, 257 
17, 472 
10, 154 
6,362 



11, 008 



242 

753 

1,261 

1,547 

1,411 

2, 535 

1,728 

918 

613 



8,682 



134 

597 

1,013 

1,252 

1,142 

2,047 

1,372 

701 

424 



269, 813 



47. 809 
37, 828 
35, 855 

35. 810 
26, 719 
37, 277 
25, 033 
14, 425 

9, 057 



296, 855 



57, 977 
40, 726 
37, 941 
37, 406 
29, 394 
41,455 
27, 006 
15,721 
9, 229 

139, 169 



29,674 
18, 357 
16, 708 
16, 347 
13, 555 
19, 974 
13, 009 
7,463 
4,082 



157, 686 



28, 303 
22, 369 
21,233 
21,059 
15, 839 
21,481 
13, 997 
8, 258 
5, 147 



1,377 



31 
50 
97 
131 
125 
309 
289 
191 
L54 



847 



13 
26 

57 
80 
82 
212 
175 
119 
83 



10,247 



1,880 

1,901 

1,424 

1,241 

989 

1,308 

796 

447 

261 



8, 670 



2, 157 
1,589 
1,113 
948 
733 
984 
623 
325 
198 



2,969 



985 
670 
349 
294 
203 
289 
152 
80 
47 



5,701 



1,172 
1,019 
764 
654 
530 
695 
471 
245 
151 



128 



56, 667 



9, 552 
10,500 
9,532 
7,745 
5, 244 
C, 787 
3, 861 
2, 086 
1,360 



92, 545 



15, 504 

14, 485 

14,929 

12,555 

9,190 

12, 608 

7,095 

3,861 

2,318 

51,531 



8,875 
6, 935 
8, 157 
7, 085 
5,397 
7, 527 
4,091 
2,210 
1, 254 



41,014 



6, 629 
7, 550 
6,772 
5,470 
3,793 
5,081 
3,004 
1,651 
1, 064 



9, 503 



202 

696 

1,152 

1,409 

1,269 

2,205 

1,412 

707 

451 



7, 779 



115 

569 

951 

1,167 

1,051 

1,826 

1,185 

577 

338 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



247 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 

PORTO RICO— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total. 



Can neither 

read nor 

write. 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



Can read 
and write. 



Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored, both sexes . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 vears 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 vears 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



108 
156 
248 
295 
269 
488 
356 
217 
189 



250, 216 



48, 473 
35, 595 
33, 231 
31,809 
23, 589 
34, 220 
22, 816 
12,891 
7,592 



120,216 



25,444 
16, 460 
15, 437 
14, 491 
11,068 
16, 593 
10, 954 
6,304 
3,465 



130, 000 



23,029 
19, 135 
17, 794 
17,318 
12, 521 
17, 627 
11,862 
6,587 
4,127 



530 



18 
24 
40 
51 
43 
97 
114 
72 
71 



211, 266 



40, 747 
28, 869 
26, 474 
26, 231 
19, 898 
29, 605 
20, 573 
11,824 
7,045 



99, 669 



21,259 

13, 434 

11,892 

11,531 

9,061 

13, 906 

9, 651 

5,729 

3, 206 



111,597 



19, 188 
15, 435 
14,582 
14,700 
10, 837 
15, 699 
10, 922 
6,095 
3,839 



6, 5S2 



1,229 
1,277 
964 
828 
614 
846 
448 
244 
132 



2, 108 



524 
400 
311 
243 
163 
245 
138 
57 
27 



4,474 



705 

877 
653 
585 
4f.1 
601 
Mill 
1ST 
105 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



Total population, both sexes 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 vears 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



68, 307 



12, 937 
9,572 
8,893 
8,424 
6, 795 
9,572 
6,211 
3,679 
2,224 



33, 199 



6,733 
4,419 
4,136 
3,786 
3,309 
4,846 
3,096 
1,823 
1,051 



56, 853 



10, 964 
7,811 
7,089 
6,920 
5,690 
7,924 
5,316 
3,201 
1,938 



26, 237 



5, 543 
3,532 
3,066 
2,874 
2,621 
3,723 
2,499 
1,509 
870 



1,161 



273 

219 

162 

139 

114 

131 

74 

33 

16 



135 
81 
52 
53 
27 
54 
15 



248 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total females . 



10 to 14 years. 
15 to 19 years. 



20 to 24 
25 to 29 
30 to 34 
35 to 44 
45- to 54 



years. 
years, 
years, 
years. 

years. 



55 to G4 years 

65 years and over . 



Native white, both sexes. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white males. . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Native white females. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Foreign white, both sexes. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Foreign white males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Total. 



35, 108 



6,204 
5,153 
4, 757 
4,638 
3,486 
4,726 
3,115 
1,856 
1,173 



57, SOS 



10, 939 
7,960 
7,491 
7,171 
5,890 
8,205 
5, 255 
3,063 
1,834 



Can neither 

read nor 

write. 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



28, 027 



5,741 
3,646 
3, 459 
3,205 
2, 859 
4,144 
2,622 
1,510 
841 



29, 781 



5,198 
4,314 
4,032 
3, 966 
3,031 
4,061 
2,633 
1,553 
993 



709 



8 
44 
87 

115 
77 

165 
99 
67 
47 



36 
65 
91 
67 
142 
83 



30, 616 



5,421 
4,279 
4,023 
4,046 
3,069 
4,201 
2,817 
1,692 
1,068 



48, 615 



9,308 
6,566 
6,068 
5,990 
5,014 
6,879 
4,516 
2,676 
1,598 



22, 451 



4,735 
2,928 
2,609 
2,495 
2,309 
3,272 
2,143 
1,261 
699 



26, 164 



4,573 
3, 638 
3, 459 
3,495 
2,705 
3,607 
2,373 
1,415 
899 



L29 



73:! 



138 
138 
110 
86 
87 
77 
59 
26 
12 



928 



232 

163 
131 
109 

86 
112 i 

56 

26 

13 



Can read 
and write. 



352 



111 
66 
42 
45 
21 
42 
12 
6 
4 



576 



118 
97 
89 
64 
65 
70 
44 
20 
9 



3,759 



645 
736 
624 
506 
330 
448 
239 
138 
93 



8,265 



1,399 

1,231 

1,292 

1,072 

790 

1,214 

683 

361 

223 



5,224 



892 
652 
808 
665 
529 
830 
467 
243 
138 



3,041 



507 
579 
484 
407 
261 
384 
216 
118 
85 



6 
41 
71 

101 
68 

134 
77 
44 
29 



494 



2 
36 
58 
83 
62 
118 
72 
39 
24 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



249 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total. 



Can neither 

read nor 

write. 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



Can read 
and write. 



Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored, both sexes . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



9,790 



1,990 

1,568 

1,315 

1,138 

828 

1,202 

857 

549 

343 



4,600 



989 
737 
612 
490 
383 
560 
391 
264 
174 



5,190 



1,001 
831 
703 
648 
445 
642 
466 
285 
169 



8,109 



1,654 

1,244 

1,006 

916 

670 

1,014 

780 

503 

322 



3,709 



807 
604 
450 
371 
308 
427 
345 
238 
159 



4,400 



847 
640 
556 
.545 
362 
587 
435 
265 
163 



1,457 



295 

270 

279 

192 

133 

169 

61 

40 

18 



816 



161 
118 
152 
111 
70 
121 
43 
25 
15 



641 



134 

152 

127 

81 

63 

48 

18 

15 

3 



DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



Total population, both sexes 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years _ 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



110, 832 



21, 505 

15, 694 

14, 887 

14,374 

11,174 

15,617 

9, 452 

5,191 

2,938 



54, 710 



11,298 
7,030 
6,995 
6,927 
5, 575 
8,067 
4,802 
2,609 
1,407 



92, 036 



18, 213 
12, 767 
11, 902 
11,823 
9,223 
12, 981 
8,037 
4,534 
2,556 



43, 526 



9,344 
5,624 
5,268 
5,376 
4,332 
6,335 
3,868 
2,202 
1,177 



1,947 



452 
391 
240 
205 
171 
233 
143 
71 
41 



225 
135 



16, 849 



2,840 
2, 536 
2,745 
2,346 
1,780 
2,403 
1,272 
586 
341 



10,444 



1,729 

1,271 

1,638 

1,484 

1,195 

1,649 

878 

383 

217 



250 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 



DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total. 



Can neither 
read nor 

write. 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



Can read 
and write. 



Total females. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Native white, both sexes. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Native white males . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Native white females . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Foreign white, both sexes. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Foreign white males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



56, 122 



10, 207 
8, 664 
7, 892 
7,447 
5,599 
7, 550 
4,650 
2, 582 
1,531 



83, 671 



16,439 

11,871 

11,361 

10, 798 

8, 520 

11, 729 

6,972 

3, 828 

2,153 



411.921 



8, 627 
5,284 
6, 283 
5, 122 
4,209 
5,981 
3, 532 
1,897 



42, 750 



7,812 
6, 587 
6, 078 
5, 676 
4,311 
5,748 
3,440 
1,931 
1,167 



1,427 



17 

74 
177 
179 
147 
339 
251 
131 
112 



1,104 



146 
141 
125 
269 
186 
104 
76 



48, 510 



8,869 
7,143 
6,634 
6,447 
4, 891 
6,646 
4,169 
2, 332 
1,379 



68, 737 



13, 761 

9,499 
8,988 
8,786 
6,966 
9,674 
5,872 
3,326 
1,865 



32, 228 



6, 999 
4,158 
3,941 
3,933 
3,248 
4,688 
2,833 
1,604 
824 



36, 509 



6, 762 
5,341 
5,047 
4,853 
3,718 
4,986 
3,039 
1,722 
1,041 



394 



218 



1,207 



227 

256 

151 

138 

123 

150 

87 

47 

28 



1,430 



363 
291 
170 
141 
117 
170 
102 
48 
28 



193 
94 
59 
45 
36 
56 
40 
17 



IVli 
197 
111 
96 
81 
114 
62 
31 
20 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



251 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 



DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total. 



Can neither 

read nor 

write. 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



Can read 
and write. 



Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored, both sexes . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



323 



25, 734 



5,049 
3,749 
3,349 
3,397 
2,507 
3,549 
2,229 
1,232 
673 



12, 685 



2, 662 
1,698 
1,506 
1,664 
1, 241 
1,817 
1,084 
608 
345 



13,049 



2,387 
2,051 
1,783 
1,733 
1,266 
1,732 
1,145 
624 
328 



176 



22, 905 



4,446 
3, 249 
2,877 
3,007 
2,232 
3,218 
2,080 
1,163 
633 



11, 080 



2,343 

1,459 

1,302 

1,428 

1,070 

1,595 

992 

567 

324 



11,825 



2,103 
1,790 
1,575 
1,579 
1,162 
1,623 
1,088 
596 
309 



181 



2,331 



514 
402 
403 
327 
222 
270 
114 
50 
29 



1,424 



287 

200 

235 

215 

160 

197 

79 

34 

17 



227 

202 

168 

112 

62 

73 

35 

16 

12 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Total population, both sexes 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years .' 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



110, 913 



20, 632 

15, 800 

14, 930 

14, 370 

10, 588 

15, 332 

9,749 

5,908 

3,604 



53, 457 



10, 744 
7,418 
6,964 
6,673 
5,003 
7, 543 
4,749 
2, 795 
1,568 



78, 759 



15, 402 
10, 699 
9,937 
9,947 
7,330 
10, 847 
7, 288 
4,514 
2,795 



36, 877 



8,022 
5, 020 
4,405 
4,336 
3,234 
5,079 
3,458 
2,103 
1,220 



3,786 



765 
670 
537 
492 
349 
453 
265 
155 
100 



335 
209 
188 
159 
104 
132 
70 
36 
18 



28, 368 



4, 465 
4,431 
4,456 
3,931 
2,909 
4, 032 
2,196 
1,239 
709 



15, 329 



2,387 
2,189 
2,371 
2,178 
1,665 
2,332 
1,221 
656 
330 



252 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Native white, both sexes. . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Native white males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 64 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Native white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Foreign white, both sexes 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Foreign white males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 





Can neither 


Can read 


Can read 
and write. 


Total. 


raed nor 
write. 


but can not 

write. 


57,456 


41, 882 


2,5S5 


13,039 


9,888 


7,380 


430 


2,078 


8,382 


5,679 


461 


2,242 


, 7,966 


5, 532 


349 


2, 085 


7,697 


5,611 


333 


1,753 


5,585 


4,096 


245 


1,244 


7,789 


5,768 


321 


1,700 


6,000 


3,830 


195 


975 


3,113 


2,411 


119 


583 


2,036 


1,575 


82 


379 


50, 780 


33, 376 


1,389 


16, 015 


9,800 


6,732 


367 


2,701 


7,419 


4,574 


228 


2,617 


6,898 


4,234 


168 


2,496 


6,497 


4,285 


166 


2,046 


4,795 


3,141 


115 


1,539 


6,779 


4,515 


143 


2,121 


4,263 


2,910 


99 


1,254 


2,709 


1,870 


55 


784 


1,620 


1,115 


48 


457 


24,044 


15, 678 


497 


7,869 


5,074 


3,460 


171 


1,443 


3,391 


2, 108 


91 


1,192 


3,160 


1,872 


57 


1,231 


2,966 


1,882 


51 


1,033 


2,204 


1,392 


32 


780 


3,289 


2,200 


46 


1,043 


2, 026 


1,414 


21 


591 


1,254 


869 


18 


367 


680 


481 


10 


189 


26, 736 


17, 698 


892 


8,146 


4,726 


3,272 


196 


1,258 


4,028 


2,466 


137 


1,425 


3,738 


2,362 


111 


1,265 


3,531 


2,403 


115 


1,013 


2,591 


1,749 


83 


759 


3,490 


2,315 


97 


1,078 


2,237 


1,496 


78 


663 


1,455 


1,001 


37 


417 


940 


634 


38 


268 


3,841 


301 


50 


3,490 


111 


12 


8 


91 


368 


17 


1 


350 


487 


11 


7 


469 


579 


29 


4 


646 


542 


32 


8 


502 


888 


72 


9 


807 


489 


69 


7 


423 


241 


37 


4 


200 


136 


32 


2 


102 


3,014 


186 


24 


2,804 


64 


6 


5 


53 


307 
400 


9 

7 




298 


3 


390 


477 


20 


2 


455 


443 


22 


6 


415 


691 


48 


4 


639 


369 


37 


3 


S29 


178 


22 


1 


155 


85 


15 




70 








STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



253 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON— Continued. 



Age period. 



Can neither 

read nor 

write. 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



Can read 
and write. 



Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

26 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored, both sexes . . . 

. 10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



827 



47 

61 

87 

102 

99 

197 

120 

63 

61 



5(1, 292 



10, 721 
8,013 
7,545 
7,294 
5,251 
9,665 
4,997 
2, 958 
1,848 



26, 399 



5,606 
3, 720 
3,404 
3,230 
2,356 
3,563 
2, 354 
1,363 



29, 893 



5,115 
4, 293 
4,141 
4,064 
2,895 
4, 102 
2,643 
1,595 
1,045 



115 



45, 082 



8, 658 
6,108 
5,692 
5,633 
4,157 
6,260 
4,319 
2,607 
1,648 



21,013 



4,556 
2,903 
2,526 
2,434 
1,820 
2,831 
2,007 
1,212 
724 



24, 069 



4,102 
3,205 
3,166 
3,199 
2,337 
3,429 
2,312 
1,395 
924 



2,347 



390 
441 
362 
322 
226 
301 
159 
96 
50 



159 

118 

128 

106 

66 

82 

46 

17 



1,617 



231 
323 
234 
216 
160 
219 
113 
79 
42 



686 



38 
52 
79 
91 
87 
168 
94 
45 
32 



8,863 



1,673 

1,464 

1,491 

1,339 

868 

1,104 

519 

255 

150 



4,656 



891 
699 
750 
690 
470 
650 
301 
134 
71 



4,207 



782 
765 
741 
649 
398 
454 
218 
121 
79 



DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



Total population, both saxes 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 vears 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



75,750 



14, 780 
10, 663 
10, 063 
9,764 
7,364 
10, 357 
6,677 
3,879 
2, 203 



36, 765 



7,765 
4,834 
4,631 
4,430 
3,558 
5,231 
3,332 
1,966 
1,018 



60, 253 



11,926 
8,267 
7,679 
7, 720 
5,881 
8,309 
5,491 
3,208 
1,772 



28, 251 



6,114 
3,725 
3,398 
3,293 
2,707 
4,001 
2,658 
1,574 
781 



279 
250 
164 
152 
115 
176 
106 
64 
25 



120 
103 
53 
41 
40 
69 
27 
15 
11 



14, 166 



2, 575 
2,146 
2,220 
1,892 
1,368 
1,872 
1,080 
607 
406 



8,035 



1,531 

1,006 

1,180 

1,096 

811 

1,161 

647 

377 

226 



254 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total females . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 vears and over 



Native white, both sexes. 



10 to 14 years , 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Native white males . . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Native white females . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Foreign white, both sexes . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Foreign white males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 yearsand over 





Can neither 


Can read 


Can read 
and write. 


Total. 


read nor 
write. 


but can not 
write. 


38, 985 


32, 002 


852 


6,131 


7,015 


5, 812 


159 


1,044 


5, 829 


4,542 


147 


1,140 


5,432 


4,281 


111 


1,040 


5,334 


4,427 


111 


796 


3,806 


3,174 


75 


557 


5,126 


4,308 


107 


711 


3,345 


2,833 


79 


433 


1,913 


1,634 


49 


230 


1,185 


991 


14 


180 


38, 248 


27, 453 


776 


10,019 


7,393 


5,453 


180 


1,760 


5,426 


3,753 


150 


1,523 


5,147 


3,514 


86 


1,547 


4,915 


3,495 


91 


1,329 


3,703 


2,683 


62 


958 


5, 227 


3,800 


89 


1,338 


3,331 


2,483 


66 


782 


1,967 


1,462 


38 


467 


1,139 


810 


14 


315 


18, 580 


12, 859 


277 


5,444 


3,876 


2, 756 


81 


1,039 


2,449 


1,689 


62 


698 


2,342 


1,522 


28 


792 


2,277 


1,498 


28 


751 


1,794 


1,228 


19 


547 


2,667 


1,869 


33 


765 


1,673 


1,243 


14 


416 


964 


690 


6 


268 


538 


364 


6 


168 


19, 668 


14, 594 


499 


4, 575 


3, 517 


2, 697 


99 


721 


2, 977 


2,064 


88 


825 


2, 805 


1,992 


58 


755 


2,638 


1,997 


63 


578 


1,909 


1, 455 


43 


411 


2,560 


1,931 


56 


573 


1,658 


1,240 


52 


366 


1,003 


772 


32 


199 


601 


446 


8 


147 


740 


53 


6 


681 


11 
43 






11 


2 


1 


40 


71 
88 
75 


4 
2 

1 




67 




86 


1 


73 


194 
123 

77 


17 
6 
17 




177 




117 


2 


58 


58 


4 


2 


52 


640 


37 


4 


599 


6 
38 
62 
73 
64 
174 
114 
66 






6 


2 
2 
1 




36 




60 




72 


1 


63 


14 
4 
11 


160 




110 


1 


54 


43 


3 


2 


38 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



255 



Table XVI II. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 



DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA— Continued. 



Age period. 



Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored, both sexes . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 vears 

3D to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Total. 



Can neither 
read nor 

write. 



100 



36, 762 



7,376 
5,194 
4,845 
4,761 
3,586 
4,936 
3,223 
1,835 
1,006 



17, 545 



3, 883 
2,347 
2,227 
2,080 
1,700 
2,390 
1,545 
936 
437 



19, 217 



3,493 
2,847 
2,618 
2,681 
1,886 
2,546 
1,678 
899 
569 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



16 



32, 747 



6,473 
4,512 
4,161 
4,223 
3,197 
4,492 
3,002 
1,729 
958 



15,355 



3,358 
2,034 
1,874 
1,794 
1,479 
2,118 
1,411 
873 
414 



17, 392 



3,115 

2,478 
2,287 
2,429 
1,718 
2,374 
1,591 
856 
544 



549 



198 



351 



60 



Can read 
and write. 



82 



4,466 



583 
606 
477 
337 
357 
181 
82 
39 



1,992 



486 
272 
328 
273 
201 
236 
121 
55 
20 



1,474 



318 
311 
278 
204 
136 
121 
60 
27 
19 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



Total population, both sexes 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years. 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



60, 539 



11,769 
8,298 
7,664 
7,463 
5,664 
8,390 
5,865 
3,371 
2,055 



29, 617 



6,235 
3,876 
3,538 
3,433 
2,687 
4, 172 
2,955 
1,736 
985 



48, 965 



9, 696 
6,538 
5, 934 
5,912 
4,556 
6,778 
4,904 
2,892 
1,755 



23, 372 



5,102 
3,030 
2,645 
2, 585 
2,105 
3,237 
2,392 
1,456 
820 



1,085 



195 
195 
141 
119 
107 
140 
104 
57 
27 



10,489 



1,878 

1,565 

1,589 

1,432 

1,001 

1, 472 

857 

422 

273 



5,! 



1,039 
775 
855 
814 
551 
891 
533 
266 
158 



256 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total females . 



Total. 



Can neither 

read nor 

write. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Native white, both sexes. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years , 

65 years and over , 

Native white males.. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Native white females. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over , 



Foreign white, both sexes. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years , 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years , 

65 years and over 

Foreign white males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over , 



30, 922 



5,534 
4,422 
4,126 
4,030 
2, 977 
4, 218 
2,910 
1,635 
1,070 



27, 676 



25, 593 



4,594 
3, 508 
3, 289 
3, 327 
2, 451 
3,541 
2,512 
1,436 
935 



20, 157 



5,346 
3,825 
3,549 
3,430 
2, 635 
3,865 
2,574 
1,525 
927 



4,033 
2,681 
2,423 
2,423 
1,883 
2,814 
1,967 
1,210 
723 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



13, 398 



2,818 
1,750 
1,611 
1,590 
1,227 
1,946 
1,268 
772 
416 



14, 278 



2,528 
2,075 
1,938 
1,840 
1,408 
1,919 
1,306 
753 
511 



540 



9,587 



2,111 

1,238 

1, 058 

1,057 

856 

1,385 

968 

599 

315 



10, 570 



1,922 

1,443 

1,365 

1,366 

1,027 

1,429 

999 

611 

408 



69 



23 

48 
59 
45 
128 
126 
57 
46 



5 

15 
40 
47 
34 
108 
112 
40 
34 



101 
124 
103 
85 
76 
96 
74 
43 
20 



513 



105 
96 
70 
58 
47 
66 
56 
28 
17 



:;s2 



Can read 
and write. 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



257 



Table XVIII.- 



-Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 
by literacy — Continued. 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO— Continued. 



Age period. 



Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored, both sexes ... 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Total. 



Can neither 

read nor 

write. 



32, 323 



6,415 
4,450 
4,067 
3,974 
2,984 
4,397 
3,165 
1,789 
1,082 



15,784 



3,412 
2,111 
1,887 
1, /96 
1,426 
2,118 
1,575 
924 
535 



16, 539 



3,003 
2,339 
2,180 
2,178 
1,558 
2,279 
1,590 
865 
547 



28, 739 



5,663 
3,853 
3,508 
3,481 
2,667 
3,951 
2,920 
1,672 
1,024 



13, 738 



2,991 
1,789 
1,584 
1,523 
1,246 
1,842 
1,412 
850 
501 



15,001 



2,672 
2, 064 
1,924 
1,958 
1,421 
2,109 
1,508 
822 
523 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



335 



Can read 
and write. 



78 



3,049 



662 
498 
488 
432 
257 
375 
199 
90 
48 



1,846 



372 
280 
287 
258 
161 
249 
142 
65 
32 



1,203 



290 

218 

201 

174 

96 

126 

57 

25 

16 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGTJEZ. 



Total population, both sexes 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



91, 052 



16, 288 
13, 106 
12, 146 
11,078 
9,001 
13,029 
8,493 
4,928 
2,983 



44,169 



8,490 
6,003 
5,744 
5,071 
4,405 
6,571 
4,153 
2,352 
1,380 



65, 121 



12, 062 
8,830 
7,921 
7,667 
6,475 
9,570 
6,428 
3,827 
2,341 



30,5ns 



6,235 
4,146 
3,570 
3,325 
2,996 
4,583 
2,968 
1,738 
1,027 



2, 562 



561 
506 
364 
267 
213 
308 
181 
107 
65 



237 
145 
90 
58 
47 
59 
36 
15 
11 



23, 369 



3,665 
3,770 
3,871 
3,144 
2,313 
3,151 
1,884 
994 
577 



12,883 



2,018 
1,712 
2,084 
1,688 
1,362 
1,929 
1,149 
599 
342 



8490—00- 



-17 



258 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 yean of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OP MAYAGUEZ— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total females . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Native white, both sexes. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Native white males.., 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Native white females. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Foreign white, both sexes. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Foreign white males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over , 



Total. 



Can neither 

read nor 

write. 



46, 883 



7,798 
7,103 
6,402 
6,007 
4,596 
6,458 
4,340 
2,576 
1,603 



57, 415 



10, 257 
8,335 
7,736 
7,108 
5,760 
8, 209 
5,221 
2,976 
1,813 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



27, 871 



5,318 
3,825 
3,670 
3,236 
2,820 
4,136 
2,586 
1,425 
855 



29, 544 



4, 939 
4,510 
4,06b 
3,872 
2,940 
4,073 
2,635 
1,551 
958 



1,414 



33 
82 
129 
185 
188 
309 
250 
138 
100 



1,062 



19 
60 
101 
147 
134 
238 
190 
102 
71 



34,533 



5,827 
4,684 
4,351 
4,342 
3,479 
4,987 
3,460 
2,089 
1,314 



3s, t)34 



7,182 
5,272 
4,774 
4,736 
3,987 
5,732 
3,730 
2,185 
1,336 



18,408 



3,704 
2,487 
2,177 
2,072 
1,867 
2, 741 
1,764 
997 
599 



20, 526 



3,478 
2,785 
2,597 
2,664 
2, 120 
2,991 
1,966 
1,188 
737 



160 



1,864 



324 
361 
264 
209 
166 
249 
145 
92 
54 



1,5*66 



214 
156 
132 
174 
118 
67 
40 



425 



Can read 
and write. 



146 
87 
54 
33 
31 
34 
22 
10 



223 

209 

160 

123 

101 

140 

96 

57 

32 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



259 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ— Continued. 



Age period. 





Can neither 


Can read 


Can read 
and write. 


Total. 


read nor 
write. 


but can not 
write. 


352 


54 


11 


287 


14 
22 
28 


4 




10 


1 
1 


21 


4 


23 


38 

54 


2 
11 




36 


3 


40 


71 


10 


1 


60 


60 


12 


2 


46 


36 


6 


1 


29 


29 


5 


2 


22 


32, 223 


26, 027 


981 


5, 215 


5,998 


4,876 


191 


931 


4,689 


3,556 


209 


924 


4,281 


3,139 


139 


1,003 


3,785 


2,919 


110 


756 


3,053 


2,462 


78 


513 


4,511 


3,802 


132 


577 


3,022 


2,664 


60 


298 


1,814 


1,620 


39 


155 


1,070 


989 


23 


58 


15,236 


12, 074 


269 


2,893 


3,153 


2,531 


90 


532 


2,118 


1, 657 


58 


403 


1,973 


1,389 


36 


548 


1,688 


1,243 


24 


421 


1,451 


1,114 


16 


321 


2,197 


1,816 


24 


357 


1,377 


1,182 


13 


182 


825 


725 


5 


95 


454 


417 


3 


34 


16,987 


13, 953 


712 


2,322 


2,845 


2,345 


101 


399 


2,571 


1,899 


151 


521 


2,308 


1,750 


103 


455 


2,097 


1,676 


86 


335 


1,602 


1,348 


62 


192 


2,314 


1,986 


108 


220 


1,645 


1,482 


47 


116 


989 


895 


34 


60 


616 


572 


20 


24 



Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

■45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored, both sexes . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 vears 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Total population, both sexes 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



141, 901 



26, 442 
20, 015 
19,892 
18, 792 
13, 731 
19, 505 
12, 821 
6,760 
3,943 



70, 650 



13,847 
9,339 
9,656 
9,149 
6,828 

10, 000 
6,491 
3,477 
1,863 



107, 511 



20, 492 
14, 733 
14, 050 
13, 779 
10, 262 
14, 960 
10, 404 
5,560 
3,271 



60, 834 



10,586 
6,740 
6,305 
6,169 
4,703 
7,134 
4,992 
2,729 
1,476 



3, 508 



870 
642 
491 
409 
295 
410 
225 
102 
64 



1,174 



369 

228 

155 

130 

78 

102 

68 

31 

13 



30, 882 



5,080 
4,640 
5,351 
4,604 
3,174 
4, 135 
2,192 
1,098 
608 



18, 642 



2,892 
2,371 
3,196 
2,850 
2,047 
2,764 
1,431 
717 
374 



260 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy— Continued. 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total females . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Native white, both sexes. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years , 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years , 

65 years and over , 

Native white males . . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Native white females . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 vears 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Foreign white, both sexes. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Foreign white males. 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Total. 



Can neither Can read 
read nor but can not 
write. write. 



71,251 



12, 595 

10, 676 
10, 236 
9,643 
6,903 
9,505 
6,330 
3,283 
2,080 



82, 472 



15, 464 

11, 964 

11, 801 

10, 990 

8,014 

11,033 

7,108 

3,839 

2,259 



40, 828 



5, 517 
5,689 
5, 330 
4,042 
5,627 
3, 545 
1,931 
1,067 



41, 644 



7,384 
6,447 
6, 112 
5, 660 
3, 972 
5, 406 
3,563 
1,908 
1,192 



2, 337 



64 

11 '.) 
262 
342 
337 
612 
390 
207 
II I 



1,855 



93 
199 

276 
27r. 
425 
318 
162 
79 



56, 677 



9,906 
7,993 
7,745 
7,610 
5,559 
7,826 
5,412 
2,831 
1,795 



59, 583 



11,508 
8,381 
7,940 
7,691 
5, 720 
8, 041 
5,528 
2,992 
1,782 



27, 95* 



5, 909 
3,749 
3,529 
3,410 
2,655 
3,819 
2,644 
1,443 



31, 625 



5, 599 
4,632 
4,411 
4,281 
3,065 
4,222 
2,884 
1,549 
982 



271 



176 



2, 334 



501 
414 
336 
279 
217 
308 
157 
71 
51 



2, 03S 



541 
365 
274 
227 
174 
230 
126 
63 
38 



235 
141 
87 
73 
52 
62 
35 
18 
6 



Can read 
and write. 



1,329 



306 

224 

187 

154 

122 

168 

91 

45 

32 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



261 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE— Continued. 



Age period. 



Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored, both sexes . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



Total. 



57, 092 



10, 924 
7,932 
7,829 
7,460 
5,380 
7,960 
5, 323 
2,714 
1,570 



27,967 



5,739 
3,729 
3,768 
3,543 
2,511 
3,948 
2,628 
1,384 
717 



29, 125 



5,185 
4,203 
4,061 
3,917 
2,869 
4,012 
2,695 
1,330 
853 



Can neither 

read nor 

write. 



47,657 



8,977 
6,347 
6,091 
6,052 
4, 513 
6,868 
4,808 
2, 530 
1,471 



22, 700 



4,673 
2,988 
2,767 
2,738 
2, 024 
3,277 
2,302 
1,264 
667 



24, 957 



4,304 
3, 359 
3,324 
3,314 
2,489 
3,591 
2,506 
1,266 
804 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



1,448 



329 

277 

215 

181 

120 

175 

92 

33 

26 



134 
87 
67 
56 
26 
39 
29 
10 
7 



993 



195 
190 
148 
125 
94 
136 
63 
23 
19 



Can read 
and write. 



23 
24 

52 
51 
56 

Tit 
47 
26 
26 



7,987 



1,618 

1,308 

1,523 

1,227 

747 

917 

423 

151 

73 



4,812 



932 
654 
934 
749 
461 
632 
297 
110 
43 



3,175 



686 
654 
589 
478 
286 
285 
126 
41 
30 



CITY OF PONCE 



Total population, both sexes 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years , 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



21, 978 



3,122 
3,172 
3,423 
3,136 
2,317 
3,194 
1,995 
1,094 
525 



10, 183 



1,533 

1,428 

1,595 

1,518 

1,089 

1,511 

863 

470 

176 



9,796 



1,171 
1,246 
1,370 
1,339 
1,044 
1,556 
1,096 
644 
330 



4,053 



588 
560 
531 
596 
402 
637 
395 
237 
107 



310 

208 

166 

155 

102 

146 

96 

42 

30 



119 
68 
40 
38 
20 
22 
22 
10 
5 



10, 927 



1,641 

1,718 

1,887 

1,642 

1,171 

1,492 

803 

408 

165 



5,78 



826 
800 
1,024 
884 
667 
852 
446 
223 
64 



262 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 



CITY OF PONCE— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Native white, both sexes . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Native white males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Native white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Foreign white, both sexes 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Foreign white males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 





Can neither 


Can read 


Can read 
and write. 


Total. 


read nor 
write. 


but can not 
write. 


11,795 


5,743 


911 


5,141 


1,589 


583 


191 


815 


1,744 


686 


140 


918 


1,828 


839 


126 


863 


1,618 


743 


117 


758 


1,228 


642 


82 


504 


1,683 


919 


124 


640 


1,132 


701 


74 


357 


624 


407 


32 


185 


349 


223 


25 


101 


10, 967 


3,925 


545 


6, 497 


1,689 


512 


155 


1,022 


1,697 


552 


96 


1,049 


1,757 


569 


67 


1,121 


1,526 


530 


52 


944 


1,107 


392 


43 


672 


1,535 


605 


62 


868 


915 


410 


36 


469 


513 


247 


20 


246 


228 


108 


14 


106 


5,099 


1,679 


157 


3,263 


850 


263 


61 


526 


783 


246 


36 


501 


825 


230 


18 


577 


734 


243 


9 


482 


530 


153 


10 


367 


699 


241 


11 


447 


402 


174 


7 


221 


205 


95 


3 


107 


71 


34 


2 


35 


5,868 


2,246 


388 


3,234 


839 


249 


94 


496 


914 


306 


60 


548 


932 


339 


49 


544 


792 


287 


43 


462 


577 


239 


33 


305 


836 


364 


51 


421 


513 


236 


29 


248 


308 


152 


17 


139 


157 


74 


12 


71 


1,131 


128 


13 


990 


37 


4 
3 
15 




33 


62 




59 


130 


2 


113 


169 


14 


1 


154 


161 


13 


1 


147 


251 


30 


3 


218 


172 


28 


3 


141 


106 


14 


3 


89 


43 


7 




36 








825 


77 


5 


74a 


19 


2 




17 


45 


2 

7 




43 


91 


i 


83 


128 


8 


l 


119 


120 


10 
23 
15 




110 


189 




166 


132 


2 


115 


78 


7 


1 


70 


23 


3 




20 









STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



263 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 



CITY OF PONCE— Continued. 



Age period. 



Can neither 

read nor 

write. 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



Can read 
and write. 



Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored, both sexes... 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 



306 



9,880 



1,396 

1,413 

1,536 

1,441 

1,049 

1, 408 

908 

475 

254 



4, 259 



664 
600 
679 
656 
439 
623 
329 
187 
82 



5, 621 



732 

813 
857 
785 
610 
785 
579 
288 
172 



5, 743 



655 
691 
786 
795 
639 
921 
658 
383 
215 



2, 297 



323 
312 
294 
345 
239 
373 
206 
135 
70 



3, 446 



332 
379 
492 
450 
400 
548 
452 
248 
145 



697 



155 
112 
97 
102 
C8 
81 
57 
19 
16 



CITY OF SAN JUAN. 



Total population, both sexes 

10 to 14 years : 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years , 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years , 

55 to 64 years , 

65 years and over 



25,438 



3,481 
3,859 
4,041 
3,567 
2,569 
3,698 
2,198 
1,308 
717 



11,) 



1,712 

1,813 

1,971 

1,754 

1,275 

1,708 

929 

504 

220 



9,252 



1,278 

1,228 

1,429 

1,230 

881 

1,369 

919 

599 

319 



3, 846 



686 
533 
599 
543 
346 
516 
333 
198 
92 



1,785 



336 
302 
264 
235 
168 
235 
123 



562 



146 
96 
91 
83 
49 
54 
23 
16 
4 



264 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XVIII. — Population 10 years of age and over, by age, xe.r, race, and nativity, and 

bg literacy — Continued. 

CITY OF SAN JUAN— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total females . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 "years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 04 years 

65 years and over 



Native white, both sexes 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Native white males. . 



10 to 14 years. 
15 to 19 years. 
20 to 24 years. 
25 to 29 years. 
30 to 34 years. 



35 to 44 



45 to 54 years 



•ears. 



65 years and over . 
Native white females . 



10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 yearsand over '. 

Foreign white, both sexes. 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years' and over 

Foreign white males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years* and over 





Can neither 


Can read 


Can read 
and write. 


Total. 


read nor 
write. 


but can not 
write. 


13,552 


5,406 


1 , 223 


6,923 


1,769 


592 


190 


987 


2,046 


695 


206 


1,145 


2, 070 


830 


173 


1,067 


1,813 


687 


152 


974 


1 , 294 


535 


119 


640 


1,990 


853 


181 


956 


1,269 


586 


100 


583 


804 


401 


64 


339 


497 


227 


38 


232 


9,512 


2, 071 


495 


6,946 


1,522 


322 


138 


1,062 


1,566 


282 


85 


1,199 


1,523 


341 


65 


1,117 


1,260 


281 


62 


917 


898 


220 


39 


639 


1,272 


290 


50 


932 


737 


161 


30 


546 


471 


119 


15 


337 


263 


55 


11 


197 


4, 123 


947 


167 


3,009 


724 


181 


58 


485 


725 


136 


40 


549 


713 


158 


20 


535 


551 


132 


18 


401 


413 


97 


12 


304 


500 


117 


11 


372 


268 


69 


4 


195 


164 


40 


3 


121 


65 


17 


1 


47 


5, 389 


1,124 


328 


3,937 


798 


141 


80 


577 


841 


146 


45 


650 


810 


183 


45 


582 


709 


149 


44 


516 


485 


123 


27 


335 


772 


173 


39 


560 


469 


92 


26 


351 


307 


79 


12 


216 


198 


38 


10 


150 


2, 748 


154 


40 


2,554 


85 


3 


7 


75 


277 


9 


1 


267 


373 


4 


7 


362 


430 


18 


4 


408 


407 


21 


8 


378 


619 


39 


4 


576 


328 


32 


4 


292 


148 


14 


4 


130 


81 


14 


1 


66 


2, 129 


100 


21 


2,008 


51 


2 


5 


44 


235 
300 


5 
2 




230 


3 


295 


352 


14 


2 


336 


328 


14 


6 


308 


4.62 


26 


2 


434 


247 


21 


2 


224 


10j6 


8 


1 


97 


48 


8 




40 







STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



265 



Table XVIII. — Population, 10 years of age and over, by age, sex, race, and nativity, and 

by literacy — Continued. 



CITY OF SAN JUAN— Continued. 



Age period. 



Foreign white females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored, both sexes . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored males 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Colored females 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . , 



Total. 



34 
42 
73 
78 
79 
157 
81 
42 
33 



13, 178 



1,874 
2,016 
2,145 
1,877 
1,264 
1,807 
1,133 
689 
373 



Can neither 
read nor 

write. 



5, 634 



937 
853 
958 
851 
534 
746 
414 
234 
107 



7,544 



937 

1,163 

1,187 

1,026 

730 

1,061 

719 

455 

266 



7,027 



953 
937 

1,084 
931 
640 

1,040 
726 
466 
250 



2,799 



503 
392 
439 
397 
235 
373 
243 
150 
67 



4, 228 



450 
545 
645 
534 
405 
667 
483 
316 
183 



Can read 

but can not 

write. 



1,250 



191 

216 

192 

169 

121 

181 

89 

61 

30 



374 



108 
160 
124 
106 
90 
140 
72 
49 
27 



Can read 
and write. 



546 



31 
37 

67 
72 
70 
142 
68 
33 
26 



4,901 



730 
863 
869 
777 
503 
586 
318 
162 
93 



2,461 



351 
405 
451 
391 
268 
332 
154 
72 
37 



2,440 



379 
458 
418 
386 
235 
254 
164 
90 
56 



Table XIX. — Superior education, by age, sex, race, and nativity. 
PORTO RICO. 



Age period. 



All classes. 



Total. Male. 



Fe- 
male, 



Native white. 



Total. Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



Foreign white. 



Total. Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



Colored. 



Total Male 



Fe- 
male. 



Under 18 years... 
18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years' and over 

Porto Rico . 



341 
209 
143 
604 
817 
683 
1,057 
637 
342 
212 



166 
124 
73 
412 
602 
508 
841 
507 
261 
164 



175 

85 

70 

192 

215 

175 

216 

130 

81 



307 
175 
119 
462 
602 
484 
737 
407 
236 
138 



148 
99 
61 
312 
433 
362 
597 
330 
180 
104 



159 
76 
58 
150 
169 
122 
140 
77 
56 
34 



12 

18 

12 

91 

164 

161 

284 

202 

97 

72 



6 
11 

4 
61 

132 
118 
214 
154 
74 
58 



5, 045 



3, 65S 



1,387 



3,667 



2, 626 



1,041 



1,113 



832 



265 



65 



266 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XIX. — Superior education, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 





All classes. 


Native white. 


Foreign white. 


Colored. 


Age period. 


Total. Male. 

1 


Fe- 
male. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 




6 | 4 
5 ! 5 
1 1 

10 9 
25 21 
30 26 
24 1 22 
17 I 16 

11 S 10 
5 3 


2 

1 
4 
4 
2 
1 
1 
2 


5 
3 
1 
7 

15 
22 
12 
10 
8 
3 


3 

3 

1 

7 

13 

18 

11 

9 

7 

2 


2 








1 
1 


1 

1 






1 


1 






20 years 




21 to 24 years 










3 
2 


2 
1 


1 




2 
4 
1 

1 

1 
1 


8 
8 
10 
7 
3 
2 


7 
8 
9 
7 
3 
1 


1 


1 








1 


2 


2 




















1 
















The department . 


134 | 117 


17 


86 


74 


12 


39 


36 


3 


9 


7 


2 



Under 18 years 


' 21 
15 
13 
47 
54 
54 
73 
42 
18 
11 


10 
9 
6 
34 
44 
45 
64 
34 
16 
10 


11 
6 
7 

13 
10 
9 
9 
8 
2 
1 


20 
14 

9 
34 
42 
45 
49 
30 
10 

8 


9 

9 

5 

25 

33 
36 

42 
25 
9 

7 


11 

5 
4 
9 
9 
9 
7 
6 
1 
1 








1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 


1 

1 
1 
2 












1 




3 
10 
11 
7 
24 
9 
8 
3 


1 

8 
10 
7 
22 
7 
7 
3 


2 
2 
1 

2 
2 
1 


1 




2 


25 to 29 vears 




30 to 34 years. . . 










3 


2 


1 






65 years and over 


















The department . 


348 


272 


76 


261 


200 


61 


75 


65 


10 


12 


7 


5 



Under 18 years 

IS and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The department 



101 


48 


53 


91 


45 


46 


4 


1 


3 


6 


2 


45 


26 


19 


36 


19 


17- 


5 


3 


2 


4 


4 


40 


15 


25 


32 


11 


21 


2 




2 


6 


4 


131 


83 


48 


92 


58 


34 


25 


16 


9 


14 


9 


214 


147 


67 


131 


88 


43 


67 


49 


18 


16 


10 


214 


143 


71 


126 


84 


42 


74 


50 


24 


14 


9 


296 


204 


92 


165 


123 


42 


123 


75 


48 


8 


6 


183 


136 


47 


109 


84 


25 


68 


46 


22 


6 


6 


93 


53 


40 


63 


35 


28 


27 


16 


11 


3 


2 


58 


40 


18 


38 


25 


13 


19 


14 


5 


1 


1 


1,375 


895 


480 


883 


572 


311 


414 


270 


144 


78 


53 



DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



Under 18 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 vears 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The department 



58 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



Under 18 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The department 



333 



23 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



267 



Table XIX. — Superior education, by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Age period. 



Under 18 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The department 



All classes. 



Total. Male 



122 

74 

46 

210 

245 

182 

289 

189 

109 

65 



1,531 



56 
42 
27 
139 
166 
126 
224 
146 
80 
43 



1,049 



Fe- 
male. 



482 



Native white. 



Total. Male 



112 
65 
43 
177 
199 
142 
226 
121 
79 
46 



1,210 



52 
36 
24 
115 
127 
101 
176 
96 
57 
30 



814 



Fe- 
male. 



396 



Foreign white. 



Total. Male. 



248 



Fe- 
male, 



Colored. 



Total. Male 



Fe- 
male. 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Under 18 years 

18 and 19 years 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64'years 

65 years and over 

The department . 



61 
39 
37 
124 
140 
123 
196 
95 
56 
36 



31 
24 
22 
88 
111 
104 
163 
75 
51 
34 



53 
33 
20 
85 

111 
83 

151 
69 
37 
27 



25 
19 
10 
61 

87 
67 
123 
54 
35 
25 



506 



163 



176 









CITY OF PONCE. 














Under 18 years 


12 

9 
5 

37 
41 
31 
63 
34 
20 
8 


7 
5 
2 
27 
37 
28 
53 
29 
18 
8 


5 
4 
3 

10 
4 
3 

10 
5 
2 


10 
7 
3 
24 
24 
16 
40 
19 
11 
5 


5 
4 
2 

18 
24 
16 
33 
16 
11 
5 


5 
3 
1 
6 

7 
3 


1 
2 
2 
13 
14 
14 
20 
13 
9 
3 


1 
1 

9 
11 
11 
17 

11 
7 
3 


1 
2 
4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 


1 


1 




18 and 19 years 




20 vears 








21 to 24 years 








25 to 29 years 


3 
1 
3 
2 


2 
1 

3 
2 




















65 years and over 


















The city 


260 


214 


46 


159 


134 


25 


91 


71 


20 


10 


9 


1 





CITY OF SAN JUAN. 



Under 18 years. . . 
18 and 19 years... 

20 years 

21 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

The city.... 



65 


28 


37 


57 


26 


31 


4 


1 


3 


4 


1 


30 


16 


14 


22 


10 


12 


5 


3 


2 


3 


3 


27 


10 


17 


21 


8 


13 


2 




2 


4 


2 


93 


56 


37 


59 


36 


23 


22 


13 


9 


12 


7 


150 


96 


54 


84 


52 


32 


53 


36 


17 


13 


8 


149 


100 


49 


77 


53 


24 


64 


42 


22 


8 


5 


231 


152 


79 


119 


85 


34 


106 


62 


44 


6 


5 


121 


85 


36 


67 


49 


18 


51 


33 


18 


3 


3 


66 


35 


31 


42 


21 


21 


22 


12 


10 


2 


2 


39 


24 


15 


24 


14 


10 


14 


9 


5 


1 


1 


971 


602 


369 


572 


354 


218 


343 


211 


132 


56 


37 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, with age, sex, and race. 
PORTO RICO. 



Total. 



1 month 2 to 3 4 to 5 6 to 7 8 months 
or less, months, months, months, or more. 



Total attendants 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



26, 212 



2,161 



4,016 



3,522 



6,755 



9,758 



209 

10,254 

14, 492 

1, 052 

205 



45 
,066 
973 
49 
28 



35 

1,952 

1,869 

118 

42 



34 

1,506 

1,824 

123 

35 



39 

2,590 

3,808 

278 

40 



56 

3,140 

6, 018 

484 

60 



268 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, with age, sex, and race — Continued. 
PORTO RICO -Continued. 



Total males . 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 

Total females 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 

Total native white 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 

Native white males. . . 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 

Native white females . 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total foreign white... 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Foreign white males. 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . . 

Foreign white females. 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 



Total colored . 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 



Colored males 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over , 



Total. 


1 month 


2 to 3 


4 to 5 


6 to 7 


8 months 


or less. 


months. 


months. 


months. 


or more. 


15,507 


1,283 


2,506 


2,190 


3,976 


5,542 


98 


23 


16 


17 


18 


24 


5,779 


696 


1,151 


874 


1,450 


1,708 


8,745 


612 


1,227 


1,185 


2, 275 


3, 446 


' 749 


33 


91 


95 


206 


324 


136 


19 


31 


19 


27 


40 


10, 705 


878 


1,500 


1,332 


2,779 


4,216 


111 


22 


19 


17 


21 


32 


4,475 


470 


801 


632 


1,140 


1,432 


5,747 


361 


642 


639 


1,533 


2,572 


303 


16 


27 


28 


72 


160 


69 


9 


11 


16 


13 


20 


17, 641 


1,431 


2,707 


2,374 


4,440 


6,689 


128 


30 


18 


21 


21 


38 


6,842 


705 


1,283 


991 


1,671 


2,192 


9,746 


635 


1,274 


1,243 


2,529 


4,065 


759 


36 


97 


91 


189 


346 


166 


25 


35 


28 


30 


48 


10, 692 


855 


1, 728 


1, 534 


2,699 


3,876 


67 


16 


8 


12 


10 


21 


3,912 


382 


763 


589 


966 


1,212 


6,042 


414 


857 


849 


1,553 


2,369 


560 


25 


73 


69 


150 


243 


111 


18 


27 


15 


20 


31 


6,949 


576 


979 


840 


1,741 


2,813 


61 


14 


10 


9 


11 


17 


2,930 


323 


520 


402 


705 


980 


3,704 


221 


417 


394 


976 


1,696 


199 


11 


24 


22 


39 


103 


55 


7 


8 


13 


10 


17 


176 


18 


21 


17 


40 


80 


5 
73 






2 
8 


3 
20 




9 


7 


29 


90 


8 


12 


6 


15 


49 


6 
2 


1 


1 
1 




2 


2 


1 










81 


10 


12 


9 


20 


30 


2 
34 






1 
4 


1 
10 




5 


3 


12 


39 


4 


7 


3 


8 


17 


4 
2 


1 


1 
1 


- 


1 


1 


1 










95 


8 


9 


8 


20 


50 


3 
39 






1 
4 


2 
10 




4 


4 


17 


51 


4 


5 


3 


7 


32 


2 








1 


1 























8,395 


712 


1,288 


1,131 


2,275 


2,989 


76 


15 


17 


11 


15 


18 


3,339 


352 


662 


507 


899 


919 


4,656 


330 


583 


575 


1,264 


1,904 


287 


12 


20 


32 


87 


136 


37 


3 


6 


6 


10 


12 


4,734 


418 


776 


647 


1,257 


1,636 


29 


7 


8 


4 


7 


3 


1,833 


209 


385 


281 


474 


484 


2,664 


194 


363 


333 


714 


1,060 


185 


7 


17 


26 


55 


80 


23 


1 


3 


3 


7 


9 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



269 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, vrith age, sex, and race — Continued. 
PORTO RICO— Continued. 



Colored females 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



Total. 



3,661 



47 

1,506 

1,992 

102 

14 



1 month 
or less. 



294 



8 
143 
136 

5 

2 



2 to 3 
months. 



512 



9 

277 

220 

3 

3 



4 + o 5 
months. 



7 

226 

242 

6 

3 



6 to 7 
months. 



8 

425 

550 

32 

3 



8 months 
or more. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 





2,109 


174 


467 


347 


526 


595 








4 

874 

1,136 

86 

9 


2 

94 

73 

4 

1 




1 

170 

166 

9 

1 


1 
208 
291 

25 

1 






225 

217 

23 

2 


177 




389 




25 




4 








1,376 


119 


331 


231 


345 


350 








2 

526 
765 
75 

8 






1 
102 
119 

8 
1 


1 
125 
196 

22 
1 






55 

61 

3 


144 
163 
22 

2 


100 




226 




20 




4 










733 


55 


136 


116 


181 


245 








2 

348 

371 

11 

1 


2 

39 
12 

1 
1 












81 

54 

1 


68 

47 

1 


83 

95 

3 


77 




163 




5 


















1, 725 


144 


393 


273 


426 


489 








2 
711 
931 

73 
8 


1 

77 

61 

4 

1 






1 

171 

233 

20 

1 






187 

183 

21 

2 


133 
133 

7 


143 




321 




21 




4 










1,157 


94 


289 


187 


291 


296 








1 

434 

648 

67 

7 








1 

106 

164 

19 

1 






39 

52 
3 


125 

142 

20 

2 


82 

98 

7 


82 




192 


15 to 17 years 


18 




4 










Native white females 


568 


50 


104 


86 


135 


193 






Under 5 years 


1 

277 

283 

6 

1 


1 
38 
9 
1 
1 










5 to 9 vears 


62 

41 

1 


51 
35 


65 

69 

1 


61 


10 to 14 years 


129 




3 


18 years and over 


















14 






1 


5 


8 










Under 5 years 














5 to 9 years 


8 
5 








5 


3 


10 to 14 years 








5 


15 to 17 years 












18 years and over 


1 






1 
















Foreign white males 


6 






1 


3 


2 
























5 to 9 years 


4 
1 








3 


1 


10 to 14 years 








1 


15 to 17 years 














1 






1 

















270 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, with age, sex, and race — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA— Continued. 





Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2to3 
months. 


4 to 5 
months. 


6 to 7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 




8 








2 


6 




























4 
4 








2 


2 










4 












































370 


30 


74 


73 


95 


98 








2 

155 

200 

13 


1 

17 
12 




1 
37 
33 

2 








38 
34 
2 


32 

58 
5 


31 




63 




4 
























213 


25 


42 


43 


51 


62 








1 

88 

116 

8 






1 
20 
21 

1 








16 
9 


19 
21 

2 


16 
32 
3 


17 




33 




2 
























157 


5 


32 


30 


44 


46 








1 
67 
84 

5 


1 
1 
3 












19 
13 


17 
12 
1 


16 

26 

2 


14 




30 




2 

























DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 





3,368 


151 


523 


536 


1,057 


1,101 








21 

1,236 

1,941 

136 

34 


3 

73 

63 

3 

9 


5 

227 

266 

23 

2 


2 

210 

298 
17 
9 


10 
415 
577 

46 
9 


1 




311 




737 




47 




5 








2,087 


98 


365 


347 


642 


635 








12 

718 

1,232 

104 

21 


2 

44 
42 
2 

8 


4 
142 

199 

18 
2 




5 

237 

362 

34 

4 


1 




121 

208 

14 

4 


174 




421 




36 




3 








1,281 


53 


158 


189 


415 


466 








9 

518 
709 
32 
13 


1 

29 

21 

1 

1 


1 

85 
67 
5 


2 
89 
90 

3 

5 


5 

178 

215 

12 

5 






137 




316 




11 




2 










2,673 


121 


439 


437 


819 


857 








16 

986 

1,529 

111 

31 


2 

55 

53 

3 

8 


5 

193 

220 

19 

2 


2 

169 

245 

14 

7 


6 

321 

447 

36 

9 


1 




248 




564 




39 




5 








1,698 


79 


307 


292 


506 


514 








10 
580 
1,001 
88 
19 


2 

32 
36 
2 

7 


4 
120 
166 
15 

2 




3 

182 

288 

29 

4 


1 




103 

175 

11 

3 


143 




336 




31 




3 







SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



271 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, with age, sex, and race — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO— Continued. 





Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2 to 3 
months. 


4 to 5 
months. 


6 to 7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 




975 


42 


132 


145 


313 


343 








6 

406 

528 

23 

12 




1 
73 

54 
4 


2 

66 

70 

3 

4 


3 
139 
159 

7 
5 






23 
17 
1 
1 


105 




228 




8 




2 










14 




1 


2 


5 


6 










2 
8 
3 
1 








2 
3 










2 


3 






1 


2 










1 






























6 






1 


2 


3 


























4 
1 
1 






1 


2 


1 








1 












1 






























8 




1 


1 


3 


3 










2 
4 
2 








2 
1 










1 


2 






1 


1 










































681 


30 


83 


97 


233 


238 








3 
242 
409 
24 

3 


1 
18 
10 






2 

91 

130 

10 






34 

45 
4 


39 

53 

3 

2 


60 




171 




7 




1 














383 


19 


58 


54 


134 


118 








2 
134 

230 
15 
2 








2 
53 
74 

5 






12 
6 


22 

33 

3 


17 

33 

3 

1 


30 




84 




4 




1 














298 


11 


25 


43 


99 


120 








1 

108 

179 

9 

1 


1 
6 
4 












12 

12 

1 


22 
20 


38 
56 
5 


30 




87 




3 


18 years and over 




1 















DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Total attendants 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total males 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



5,207 



112 
2,200 
2,616 

235 
44 



2,893 



51 

1,181 

1,485 

151 

25 



526 



24 

262 

227 

9 

4 



310 



15 

156 

132 

5 

2 



14 
396 
309 

17 
2 



419 



5 
206 
193 
13 

2 



22 
267 
322 

22 
4 



382 



10 
155 
197 

19 
1 



1,177 



18 

524 

564 

58 

13 



7 
260 
309 
36 



2,129 



34 

751 

1.194 

129 

21 



1,162 



14 

404 

654 

78 

12 



272 



"REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, with age, sex, and race — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON— Continued. 



Total females . 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over , 

Total native white — 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years , 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years'and over , 

Native white males . . . 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 

Native white females . 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over , 

Total foreign white . . . 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 

Foreign white males.. 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . . 

Foreign white females. 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 

Total colored 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 



Colored males. 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 

Colored females 



Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over . 



Total. 



2,314 



01 

1,019 

1,131 

84 

19 



2,914 



64 

1,210 

1,465 

146 

29 



1,690 



31 

675 

872 

97 

15 



1, 224 



33 

535 

593 

49 

14 



40 



2,226 



45 

959 

1,120 

87 

15 



1,176 



18 

494 

602 

52 

10 



1,050 



27 
465 
518 

35 
5 



1 month 
or less. 



216 



9 
106 
95 
4 
2 



15 

129 

128 

6 

3 



175 



106 



237 



9 

129 

96 

2 

1 



107 



2 to 3 
months. 



9 
190 
116 

4 



109 



5 

214 

175 

13 

2 



109 

119 

10 

2 



5 

105 

56 

3 



9 
179 
128 

3 



175 



144 



4 to 5 
months. 



12 

112 

125 

3 

3 



368 



13 
152 
184 

16 
3 



7 

90 

124 

13 



6 to 7 
months. 



7 

112 

136 

6 

1 



144 



118 



11 
264 
255 

22 
5 



562 



9 
236 
279 
32 

6 



3 
129 
164 
22 

4 



6 
107 
115 
10 

2 



s months 
or more. 



281 

284 

26 

7 



294 



3 
129 
144 
14 

4 



312 



5 

152 

140 

12 

3 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



273 



Table XX.— -School attendance, by months, ivith age, sex, and race— Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 





Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2 to 3 
months. 


4 to 5 
months. 


6 to 7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 




3,250 


275 


384 


436 


1,036 


1,119 








13 

1,245 

1,862 

121 

9 


4 
138 
126 

7 


1 

197 

173 

10 

3 


1 

175 

248 

12 


1 

378 
614 

41 
2 


6 




357 




701 




51 




4 




2,022 


176 


273 


276 


621 


676 








5 

748 

1,169 

93 

7 


1 

82 
86 

7 








4 




135 

127 

9 

2 


105 

160 

11 


225 

366 

29 

1 


201 




430 




37 




4 




1,228 


99 


111 


160 


415 


443 








8 

497 

693 

28 

2 


3 

56 
40 


1 

62 

46 

1 

1 


1 

70 
88 

1 


1 

153 

248 

12 

1 


2 




156 




271 




14 


















2,146 


194 


232 


268 


709 


743 








7 

814 

1,222 

96 

7 


2 

101 

85 

6 


1 
115 

107 

7 
2 






4 




106 

155 

7 


251 

422 

34 

2 


241 




453 




42 


18 years and over 


3 




1,343 


120 


158 


175 


432 


458 








4 

485 

775 

74 

5 


1 

56 

57 

6 








3 




77 

74 

6 

1 


65 
103 

7 


151 

255 

25 
1 


136 




286 




30 




3 












803 


74 


74 


93 


277 


285 








3 

329 

447 

22 

2 


1 
45 

28 


1 

38 

33 

1 

1 






1 




41 
52 


100 

167 

9 

1 


105 




167 




12 


18 years and over 










12 




5 


1 


3 


3 
























3 

8 
1 




2 
3 






1 






1 


2 
1 


2 




















6 




3 


1 


2 


























1 
4 
1 




1 
2 








10 to 14 vears 




1 


1 
1 


































6 




2 




1 


3 


























2 
4 




1 
1 






1 








1 


2 








































1,092 


81 


147 


167 


324 


373 








6 

428 

632 

24 

2 


2 
37 
41 

1 




1 
69 
92 

5 


1 
127 
190 

6 


2 




80 

63 

3 

1 


115 




246 




9 




1 












8490—00 18 















274 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, with age, sex, and race — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA— Continued. 





Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2 to 3 
months. 


4 to 5 
months. 


6 to 7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 




673 


56 


112 


100 


187 


218 








1 

262 

390 

18 

2 










1 




26 

29 

1 


57 

51 

3 

1 


40 

56 

4 


74 

110 

3 


65 




144 




7 




1 














419 


25 


35 


67 


137 


155 








5 

■ 166 

242 

6 


2 
11 
12 




1 
29 
36 

1 


1 
53 
80 

3 


1 




23 
12 


50 




102 




2 

























DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 





2,403 


84 


304 


276 


639 


1,100 








14 

934 

1,324 

103 

28 


3 

48 
33 


5 

159 

125 

10 

5 


1 
133 
122 

11 
9 


2 

253 

358 

16 

10 


3 




341 




686 




66 






4 










1,402 


50 


173 


173 


395 


611 








5 
532 
768 

75 
22 


1 
28 
21 


2 
91 

67 
9 
4 




1 

146 

226 

13 

9 


1 




81 

SO 
6 
6 


186 




374 




47 






3 










1,001 


34 


131 


103 


244 


489 








9 

402 
556 

28 
6 


2 
20 
12 


3 

68 

58 

1 

1 


1 
52 
42 
5 
3 


1 

107 

132 

3 

1 


2 




155 




312 




19 






1 










1,431 


46 


184 


165 


358 


678 








6 

530 

811 

61 

23 


2 
23 
21 


1 
91 
81 

7 
4 




137 

204 

6 

9 


1 




73 

78 
8 
6 


206 




427 




40 






4 










859 


29 


105 


112 


231 


382 








4 

316 

474 

46 

19 


1 

15 
13 


1 

52 
43 
6 
3 




1 

81 

136 

5 

8 


1 




49 
54 

4 
5 


119 




228 




31 






3 










572 


17 


79 


53 


127 


296 








2 

214 

337 

15 

4 


1 
8 
8 






1 

56 

68 

1 

1 






39 

38 

1 

1 


24 

24 

4 

1 


87 




199 




9 






1 










7 








3 


4 




























3 
4 








1 
2 


2 










2 









































SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



275 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, with age, sex, and race — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO— Continued. 



Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2 to 3 

months. 


4 to 5 
months. 


6 to 7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 




5 








2 


3 




























2 

3 






1 
1 


1 






2 










































2 








1 


1 




























1 
1 










1 










1 








































965 


38 


120 


Ill 


278 


418 








8 

401 

509 

42 

5 


1 
25 
12 


4 

68 

44 

3 

1 


1 

60 

44 

3 

3 




2 




115 

152 

10 

1 


133 




257 




26 
















538 


21 


68 


61 


162 


226 








1 

214 

291 

29 

3 




1 
39 

24 
3 

1 










13 

8 


32 

26 

2 

1 


64 
89 
8 
1 


66 




144 




16 
















427 


17 


52 


50 


116 


19° 








7 

187 

218 

13 

2 


1 
12 
4" 


3 
29 
20 


1 

28 

18 

1 

o 




2 




51 
63 

2 


67 




113 




10 


18 years and over 



















DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Total attendants 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total males 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total females 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total native white. . . 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



4,304 



22 

1,607 

2,493 

168 

14 



2,481 



13 

874 

1,465 

120 

9 



1,823 



9 
733 

1,028 



3,128 



14 

1,173 

1,805 

126 

10 



342 



3 
166 
164 



1 
90 
101 



■256 



124 

125 

3 



685 



6 
312 
345 

21 
1 



404 



5 
174 
212 
12 

1 



1 
138 
133 

9 



506 



4 
231 
255 
16 



1 

213 

260 

26 

3 



300 



1 
113 
164 
21 

1 



100 
96 



151 

187 

18 

3 



'.I'.Mi 



5 

361 

597 

33 



3 
199 
349 
26 



419 



162 

248 

7 



711 



1 

253 

432 

25 



1,778 



7 

555 

1,127 

81 



999 



3 
298 
639 
54 

5 



4 
257 



1,296 



7 
414 



276 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, with aye, sex, and race — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF M AY AGUEZ— Continued. 





Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2 to 3 
months. 


4 to 5 
months. 


6 to 7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 




1,817 


147 


304 


219 


411 


736 








7 

645 

1,070 

89 

6 




3 
135 
158 

8 




1 

140 
250 
20 


3 




65 

77 
3 
2 


85 

119 

14 

1 


220 




466 




44 




3 












1,311 


109 


202 


140 


300 


660 








7 
528 
735 
37 

4 


2 
59 

48 


1 

96 
97 

8 






4 




66 
68 
4 
2 


113 

182 

5 


194 




340 




20 






2 














32 


2 


3 


4 


10 


13 






















12 

19 

1 


1 
1 


2 

1 


1 
3 


4 
5 
1 


4 




9 
































22 


2 


3 


2 


6 


9 






















9 

13 


1 
1 


2 

1 




2 
4 


4 




2 


5 




































10 






2 


4 


4 


























3 
6 

1 






1 
1 


2 
1 
1 










4 




































1,144 


84 


176 


140 


275 


469 








8 

422 

669 

41 

4 


1 
41 

38 
4 


2 

79 

89 

5 

1 


1 
61 
70 

8 


4 
104 
160 

7 






137 




312 




17 




3 














642 


52 


97 


79 


160 


254 








6 

220 

382 

31 

3 


1 
24 
23 

4 


2 

37 

53 

4 

1 


1 

28 
43 

7 


2 
57 
95 

6 






74 




168 




10 




2 














502 


32 


79 


61 


115 


215 








2 

202 

287 

10 

1 








2 
47 
65 

1 






17 
15 


42 

36 

1 


33 

27 
1 


63 




144 




7 






1 















DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Total attendants 

Under 5 years 

6 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 



5,571 



23 

2, 158 

3,120 

203 

67 



6 

285 

287 

19 

12 



915 



4 

436 

434 

14 

27 



787 



6 
338 



2 

451 

807 

59 

5 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



277 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, with age, sex, and race— Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OP PONCE— Continued. 





Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2 to 3 
months. 


4 to 5 

months. 


6 to 7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 




3,246 


329 


551 


481 


776 


1,109 








10 

1,200 

1,861 

131 

44 


3 
141 
169 

9 




5 

197 

257 

16 

6 


1 

258 

467 

46 

4 


1 




259 

266 

8 

18 


345 




702 




52 




9 




2, 325 


280 


364 


306 


548 


827 








13 

958 

1,259 

72 

23 


3 

144 

118 

10 

5 


4 

177 

168 

6 

9 


1 

141 

151 

10 

3 


1 

193 

340 

13 

1 


4 




303 




482 




33 




5 




3,624 


389 


544 


504 


855 


1,332 








19 

1,418 

1,983 

146 

58 


6 

196 

162 

14 

11 


2 

252 

253 

14 

23 


6 

207 

261 

21 

9 


2 

302 

512 

36 

3 


3 




461 




795 




61 




12 








2,128 


211 


325 


315 


506 


771 








10 

777 

1,202 

99 

40 


3 

95 
98 

8 
7 




5 

115 

176 

13 

6 


1 

177 

296 

30 

2 


1 




145 

155 
8 
17 


245 




477 




40 




8 




1,496 


178 


219 


189 


349 


561 








9 
641 

781 
47 
18 


3 
101 

64 
6 
4 


2 
107 
98 
6 
6 


1 

92 

85 

8 

3 


1 
125 
216 

6 

1 


2 




216 




318 




21 




4 




• 




30 


8 


2 


2 


5 


13 






















8 

20 
1 
1 


4 
4 




2 




2 




1 


5 


10 






1 






1 




















9 


3 


2 




1 


3 
























2 
6 


1 
2 








1 




1 




1 


2 










1 




1 




















21 


5 




2 


4 


10 
























6 

14 
1 


3 
2 




2 




1 






4 


8 








1 






























1,917 


212 


369 


281 


464 


589 








4 

732 

1,117 

56 

8 




2 
184 
180 










85 

121 

5 

1 


129 
147 

5 


149 

290 

23 

2 


185 




379 




23 




3 


2 










1,109 


115 


224 


166 


269 


335 






















421 

653 

32 

3 


45 
69 

1 


114 
110 


82 

81 

3 


81 

170 

16 

2 


99 




223 




12 






1 













278 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, with age, sex, and race — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OP PONCE— Continued. 





Total. 


1 month 
or less. 


2 to 3 
months. 


4 to 5 
months. 


6 to 7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 




808 


97 


145 


115 


195 


256 








4 
311 
464 
24 

5 




2 
70 
70 






2 




40 

52 

4 

1 


47 

66 

2 


68 
120 

7 


86 




156 




11 




3 


1 











CITY OF PONCE. 





1,900 


164 


326 


211 


336 


863 








14 

789 

1,027 

61 

9 


2 
78 
75 
8 
1 


3 

146 

169 

6 

2 


3 
100 
103 

4 

1 


2 

132 

190 

12 


4 




333 




490 




31 




5 










931 


67 


174 


112 


150 


428 








6 
377 
520 
26 

2 


1 
30 
34 

2 




3 
49 
59 

1 


1 
62 

80 

7 


1 




72 
99 
3 


164 




248 




13 




2 
















969 


97 


152 


99 


186 


435 








8 

412 

507 

35 

7 


1 

48 

41 

6 

1 


3 

74 
70 
3 
2 




1 

70 

110 

5 


3 




51 

44 

3 

1 


169 




242 




18 




3 










1,246 


91 


185 


130 


225 


615 








11 
535 
647 

46 

7 


2 
49 
34 

5 
1 


1 
87 
91 

6 


3 

63 
60 

3 

1 


2 

93 

121 

9 


3 




243 




341 




23 




5 












628 


38 


97 


73 


98 


322 








6 

254 

343 

23 

2 


1 

17 
18 

2 




3 
30 
39 

1 


1 
42 
49 

6 


1 


5 to 9 years 


41 

53 

3 


124 

184 




11 




2 














618 


53 


88 


57 


127 


293 








5 

281 

304 

23 

5 


1 
32 
16 

3 

1 


1 
46 
38 

3 




1 
51 
72 

3 


2 




33 
21 

2 
1 


119 




157 




12 




3 












24 


8 


1 


2 


5 


8 






Under 5 years 














5 to 9 years 


17 


4 
4 




2 




1 




1 


5 


7 


15 to 17 years 






18 years and over 






























7 


3 


1 




1 


., 






















5 to 9 years 


o 


I 








1 


10 to 14 vears 


1 




1 


1 








18 years and over 
















1 









SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 



279 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, ivith age, sex, and race — Continued. 
CITY OF PONCE— Continued. 





Total. 


1 month 

or less. 


2 to 3 
months. 


4 to 5 
months. 


6 to 7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 




17 


5 




2 


4 


6 
























5 

12 


3 
2 




2 










4 


6 








































630 


65 


140 


79 


106 


240 








3 

247 

363 

15 

2 




2 
59 

77 






1 




25 

37 

3 


35 

43 

1 


39 

64 

3 


89 




142 




8 




2 
















296 


26 


76 


39 


51 


104 




















121 

172 

3 


12 

14 


31 
45 


19 
20 


20 
30 

1 


39 


10 to 14 years 


63 

2 




























334 


39 


64 


40 


55 


136 








3 
126 

191 
12 
2 




2 
28 
32 






1 




13 

23 

3 


16 

23 

1 


19 
34 
2 


50 




79 




6 




2 















CITY OF SAN JUAN. 



Total attendants 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over. 

Total males 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over. 

Total females 

Under 5 years 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Total native white. . 

Under 5 years... 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 

18 years and over 

Native white males . 

Under 5 years... 

5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years. . . . 
18 years and over 



1,987 


278 


276 


256 


311 


866 


79 


15 


9 


15 


14 


26 


949 


133 


156 


125 


167 


368 


890 


126 


104 


107 


127 


426 


62 


3 


7 


8 


1 


43 


7 


1 




1 


2 


3 






943 


139 


138 


124 


136 


406 


33 


9 


4 


6 


3 


11 


471 


71 


79 


61 


72 


188 


400 


58 


50 


50 


58 


184 


35 


1 





7 


1 


21 


4 








2 


2 










1,044 


139 


138 


132 


175 


460 


46 


6 


5 


9 


11 


15 


478 


62 


77 


64 


95 


180 


490 


68 


54 


57 


69 


242 


27 
3 


2 

1 


2 


1 
1 




22 




1 








1,059 


133 


141 


124 


127 


534 


45 


9 


4 


8 


7 


17 


495 


67 


80 


62 


64 


232 


458 


55 


51 


45 


53 


254 


56 


9 


6 


8 


1 


29 


5 






1 


2 


2 








521 


64 


68 


69 


56 


264 


20 


5 




4 


1 


10 


260 


34 


39 


32 


29 


126 


211 


25 


25 


26 


23 


112 


27 
3 




4 


7 


i 


15 




1 











280 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XX. — School attendance, by months, with age, sex, and race — Continued. 

CITY OF SAN JUAN— Continued. 





Total. 


1 month 

or less. 


2 to 3 
months. 


4 to 5 
months. 


6 to 7 
months. 


8 months 
or more. 




528 


59 


73 


55 


71 


270 








25 
235 
247 

19 
2 


4 
23 
30 

2 


4 
41 
26 

2 


4 

30 

19 

1 

1 


6 

35 
30 


7 




106 




142 


15 to 17 years 


14 




1 














54 


8 


7 


6 


6 


27 








3 
22 

27 
2 






2 
2 
2 


1 

5 




5 to 9 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 17 years 


4 
3 
1 


1 
5 

1 


10 
17 




























21 


5 


3 


3 


2 


8 








2 
8 
9 
2 






1 
2 


1 

1 






3 
1 
1 




2 




2 
1 


6 


































33 


3 


4 


3 


4 


19 








1 
14 
18 






1 








1 
2 


1 
3 


4 


8 




2 


11 






































884 


147 


128 


126 


178 


305 








31 
432 
405 

14 
2 


6 

72 
68 


5 

75 
48 


5 
61 
60 


6 

98 
74 


9 




126 




155 




14 




1 








1 














401 


70 


67 


52 


78 


134 








11 

203 

180 

6 

1 


4 

34 
32 


4 
40 
23 


1 

27 
24 


1 
42 
35 


1 




60 




66 




6 












1 
















483 


77 


61 


74 


100 


171 








20 
229 
225 

8 
1 


o 
38 
36 


1 
35 
25 


4 
34 
36 


5 

56 
39 


8 




66 




89 




8 




1 












i 





SCHOOL STATISTICS. 



281 



Table XXI. — Kind and capacity of educational institutions. 
PORTO RICO. 





Number of 
schools. 


Kind of schools. 




Kind of pupils. 


Department. 


Public. 


Private. 


Religious. 


Day. Boarding. 


Both. 




42 
79 

85 
60 
57 
153 
81 


41 
64 
75 
58 
55 
49 
70 


1 

15 
9 
2 
2 
11 
11 




42 










78 
81 
59 
57 
62 
80 




1 




1 


1 


3 




1 












2 




1 






1 










Porto Rico 


467 


412 


51 


3 


459 


1 


7 




Capacity. 


Number of 
teachers. 


Number of pupils. 








Free. 




Department. 


Number 
of build- 
ings. 


Seating 
capacity. 


Male. 


Female. 


Pay. 




Male. 


Female. 


Male. 


Female. 




42 

79 
87 
60 
57 
63 
85 


2,295 
3,814 

2 5,908 

3 3, 597 
4 3, 830 

4 4,135 
5,585 


41 
50 
68 
51 
38 
54 
73 


14 
30 
74 
18 
23 
41 
48 


1,393 
2,337 
2,989 
2,505 
1,771 
1,966 
2,836 


600 
979 
2, 283 
906 
1,050 
1,206 
1,441 


206 
252 
286 
175 
119 
294 
357 


83 




227 




237 




92 




26 




124 




37S 








Porto Rico 


473 


29, 164 


375 


248 


15,797 1 8,465 


1,689 


1,167 



1 Kind of school not stated. 

2 Capacity of 4 schools not given 



3 Capacity of 2 schools not given. 

4 Capacity of 1 school not given. 



TABLE XXII. — Number of pupils by color and sex 



Department. 



Total 
pupils. 



White. 



Total. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



Pay. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male, 



Black. 



Total. 



Free. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



Pay 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



12,282 
2 3,795 
3 5, 795 

2 3,578 
2,966 

3 3, 590 
5,012 



1,856 
3,106 
3,223 
2,226 
1,689 
2,496 
3, 278 



1,146 
1,958 
1,604 
1,451 
1,008 
1,362 
1,833 



459 
698 
1,133 
587 
551 
767 
873 



179 
239 
253 

132 
107 
260 
269 



27, 018 



17, 874 



10,3(12 



5, 068 



1,439 



72 
211 
233 
56 
23 
107 
:;u:; 



169 
139 
884 
346 
347 
196 
346 



444 
258 
220 
86 
183 



62 
50 
418 
58 
123 
101 
134 



7 


1 




3 


22 




25 


5 


3 


1 


4 


5 


29 





1,005 



90 



15 



Department. 



Mixed. 



Free. 



Male. 



Female. 



Pay. 



Male. 



Female. 



Average 
attendance. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



257 

550 

1,688 

1,006 

930 

898 

1,388 



148 
293 
941 
696 
543 
518 
820 



79 
231 
732 
261 
376 
338 
434 



41,417 

6 2,432 
62,963 

7 2,192 
81,796 
»2,276 

10 2,387 



6,717 



3,959 



2, 451 



15,463 



1 Number of pupils in 6 schools not given. 

2 Number of pupils in 3 schools not given. 
3 Number of pupils in 1 school not given. 

4 Average attendance of 8 schools omitted. 
°Averageattendanceof schools omitted. 



8 Average attendance of 20 schools omitted. 

7 Average attendance of 9 schools omitted. 

8 Average attendance of 8 schools omitted. 
,J Average attendance of 15 schools omitted. 
i» Average attendance of 23 schools omitted. 



282 EEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations. 

Porto Rico. 

T< >TAL POPULATION, BOTH SEXES. 



Department. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



Total. 



99, 
162, 
160, 
111, 

88, 
127, 
203, 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



23, 196 
36, 577 
26, 264 
24, 187 
19, 495 
26, 480 
42, 562 



198, 761 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



1,687 
2,899 
4,614 
2, 126 
1,986 
4,967 
5,797 



24, 076 



Manu 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



1,948 
3,284 
5,523 
2, 770 
1,796 
4,556 
6,638 



26,515 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



145 
221 
638 
220 
198 
354 
418 



2, 194 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



5,668 
8,458 

15, 783 
6,851 
5,340 
8,331 

14, 388 



64, 819 



TOTAL MALES. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



78, 
55, 
43, 
62, 
101, 



472, 261 



22, 902 
36, 331 
26, 092 
23, 869 
19, 344 
26, 126 
42, 229 



196, 893 



1,302 
2,602 
4,544 
2, 092 
1,914 
4,183 
5, 710 



22, 347 



1,307 
2,567 
4,373 
2,156 
1,484 
3,152 
5, 087 



20,126 



125 
192 
638 
198 
172 
298 
360 



2,299 
3,528 
7,919 
2,841 
1,801 
2, 785 
6,242 



27, 415 



TOTAL FEMALES. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



50, 421 
81,407 
81,817 
56, 770 
44, 517 
64,816 
101,234 



480, 982 



294 
246 
172 
318 
151 
354 
333 



385 
297 
70 
34 
72 
784 
87 



1,729 



641 

717 

1,150 

614 

312 

1,404 

1,551 



6,389 



20 
29 
100 
22 
26 
56 
58 



3,369 
4,930 
7,864 
4,010 
3, 539 
5, 546 
8,146 



37, 404 



NATIVE WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



84, 563 
123, 601 
74, 210 
56, 041 
40, 246 
80,564 
118, 784 



20, 090 
27, 932 
12, 239 
12, 238 
8,339 
16, 888 
25, 015 



578, 009 122, 771 15, 315 



1,317 
2, 167 
2,077 
1,257 
1,204 
3,435 
3, 85S 



1,335 
2,202 
1,890 
1,249 
744 
2,568 
3,102 



13, 090 



106 
168 
366 
166 
140 
251 
278 



1,475 



4,159 
5,071 
5,113 
2,423 
1,957 
3,809 
6,157 



28, 689 



NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



41, 776 
61,254 
35, 901 
27, 619 
19, 846 
39, 625 
59, 282 



19,841 
27, 740 
12, 145 
12,052 
8, 275 
16, 684 
24, 858 



285,303 121,595 13,981 



952 
1,901 
2,054 
1,247 
1,182 
2,818 
3,827 



857 
1,653 
1,328 
861 
560 
1,526 
2, 290 



91 
145 
300 
150 
122 
214 
245 



9,075 



1,779 
2,146 
3,171 
1,246 
802 
1,503 
2, 913 



13, 560 



OCCUPATIONS. 



283 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Porto Eico — Continued. 

NATIVE WHITE FEMALES. 



Department. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



Total. 



292, 706 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



249 
192 

94 
186 

64 
204 
187 



1,176 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



365 
266 
23 
10 
22 
617 
31 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



1,334 



478 
549 
562 
388 
184 
1,042 
812 



4,015 



Profes- 
sional 
services. 



208 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



2, 380 
2, 925 
1,942 
1,177 
1,155 
2,306 
3,244 



15, 129 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



39, 300 
58, 392 
35, 622 
26, 645 
18, 957 
36, 733 
55, 195 



270, 844 



FOREIGN WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



735 
1,458 
4,018 
764 
559 
1,480 
2,403 



11,417 



175 
401 
188 
149 
71 
265 
340 



1,589 



181 
329 
1,636 
263 
198 
443 
745 



3, 795 



33 
76 
333 
85 
38 
127 
234 



25 
40 

201 
39 
33 
74 

101 



142 
246 
534 
73 
56 
142 
406 



1,599 



179 
366 
1,126 
155 
163 
429 
577 



2,995 



FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



587 
1,121 
3,097 
653 
449 
1,099 
1,886 



8,892 



174 
396 
187 
149 
71 
263 
338 



181 
328 
1,627 
263 
197 
438 
739 



1,578 



3,773 



33 
75 
324 
83 
35 
123 
221 



23 
35 
178 
34 
30 
57 
79 



135 
234 
512 
71 
53 
118 
380 



1,503 



41 

53 
269 
53 
63 
100 
129 



708 



FOREIGN WHITE FEMALES. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



148 
337 
921 
111 
110 
381 
517 



2, 525 



1 




5 


1 


1 


9 




1 


2 


5 


2 


6 



138 
313 
857 
102 
100 
329 
448 



2, 287 



COLORED, BOTH SEXES. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



14, 347 
37, 249 
81, 818 
55, 181 
47, 696 
45, 522 
82, 004 



363, 817 



2, 931 
8,244 
13, 837 
11,800 
11,085 
9,327 
17, 177 



74, 401 



189 
403 
901 
606 
584 
1,089 
1,194 



4,966 



580 
1,006 
3,300 
1,436 
1,014 
1,861 
3,302 



12, 499 



1,367 
3,141 
10, 136 
4,355 
3,327 
4,380 
7,825 



34,531 



9,266 
24,442 
53, 573 
36, 969 
31, 661 
28, 836 
52, 467 



237, 214 



284 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RTOO, 1899. 

Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 

Porto Rico — Continued. 

COLORED MALES. 



Department. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humaeao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



Total. 



178, 066 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



2,887 
8,195 
13, 760 
11,668 
10, 998 
9,179 
17, 033 



73, 720 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



169 
373 
863 
582 
535 
927 
1,144 



4,593 



Manu- 
facturing Profp - 
and me- *? ofes 
chanical 

indus- 
tries. 



2,721 
1,212 
889 
1,503 
2,576 



10,157 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



385 
1,148 
4,236 
1,524 

946 
1,164 
2,949 



12, 352 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tions. 



2, 992 
7,959 
17,591 
11, 944 
10, 301 
9,226 
17, 051 



77,064 



COLORED FEMALES. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humaeao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



7,486 
18, 723 
42, 587 
28, 237 
24,007 
23, 496 
41,215 



185, 751 



44 
49 
77 
132 
87 
148 
144 



681 



20 
30 
38 
24 
49 
162 
50 



373 



163 
167 
579 
224 
125 
358 
726 



2,342 



26 



982 
1,993 
5,900 
2,831 
2,381 
3,216 
4,876 



22, 179 



6,274 
16, 483 
35, 982 
25,025 
21,360 
19, 610 
35,416 



160, 150 



Department op Aguadilla. 

TOTAL POPULATION, BOTH SEXES. 



District. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 

indus- 
tries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 




10, 581 
17, 830 
14, 888 
20, 883 
12,410 
6,641 
16,412 


3,078 
3,134 
3,778 
4,729 
2,833 
1,417 
4,227 


198 
634 
152 
226 
50 
288 
139 


98 
813 
302 
256 
71 
46 
362 


14 
50 
18 
34 
6 
5 
18 


191 
1,281 
992 
1,491 
451 
417 
845 


7 002 




11 918 




9,646 
14 147 






8,999 
4,468 
10, 821 










99, 645 


23, 196 


1,687 


1,948 


145 


5,668 


67 001 







TOTAL MALES. 



Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 

Moca 

Rincon 

San Sebastian 

The department 



5, 228 
8,580 
7,146 
10, 483 
6,244 
3,344 
8,199 



2,907 
3,124 
3,767 
4,718 
2,818 
1,400 
4,168 



49,224 22,902 



54 
623 
138 
226 
50 
74 
137 



1,302 



131 

203 
64 
38 

178 



12 


42 


2,128 


43 


577 


3,605 


Li 


127 


2,969 


31 


817 


4,488 


5 


279 


3, 028 


4 


272 


1,556 


16 


185 


3,515 



2,299 



21,289 



OCCUPATIONS. 



285 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department of Aguadilla — Continued. 

TOTAL FEMALES. 



District. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tions. 




5,353 
9,250 
7,742 
10,400 
6,166 
3,297 
8,213 


171 
10 
11 
11 

15 
17 
59 


144 
11 
14 


13 
205 
171 

53 

7 

8 

184 


2 

7 
4 
3 
1 

1 
2 


149 
704 
865 
674 
172 
145 
660 


4, 874 




8,313 




6,677 




9, 659 






5,971 




214 

2 


2, 912 




7,306 








50, 421 


294 


385 


641 


20 


3,369 


45, 712 







NATIVE WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 

Moca 

Rincon 

San Sebastian 

The department 



8,849 
13,432 
12, 892 
18, 252 
10, 941 

5,644 
14, 553 



84, 563 



2, 633 
2,543 
3,255 
4,128 
2,548 
1,219 
3,764 



20, 090 



184 
416 
136 
165 
42 
266 
108 



66 
464 
226 
194 
60 
31 
294 



1,317 



1,335 



106 



13 


83 


5,870 


33 


692 


9,284 


16 


764 


8, 495 


22 


1,194 


12,549 


3 


386 


7,902 


5 


320 


3,803 


14 


720 


9,653 



4,159 



57,556 



NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 

Moca 

Rincon 

San Sebastian 

The department 



4,389 
6,473 
6, 206 
9,114 
5, 543 
2,825 
7,226 



2,484 
2, 534 
3,247 
4,118 
2,539 
1,205 
3,714 



41,776 19,841 



41 
410 
124 
165 
42 
64 
106 



60 
357 

95 
144 

54 

23 
124 



14 
368 
102 
662 
248 
215 
170 



1,779 



1,779 
2, 775 
2,626 
4,004 
2, 658 
1,314 
3,100 



18, 256 



NATIVE WHITE FEMALES. 



Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 

Moca 

Rincon 

San Sebastian 

The department 



4,460 
6,959 
6,686 
9,138 
5,398 
2,819 
7,327 



42, 787 



149 
9 

8 
10 

9 
14 
50 



249 



143 
6 
12 



365 



6 
107 
131 
50 

6 



478 



69 
324 
662 
532 
138 
105 
550 



2,380 



4,091 
6,509 
5,869 
8,545 
5,244 
2,489 
6,553 



39, 300 



FOREIGN WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 





41 
219 

82 
277 
17 
17 
82 


6 

16 
34 
74 
5 
5 
35 


3 
91 

7 
53 

2 

6 
19 


2 

17 
4 
8 


1 
12 


20 
21 
9 
79 
3 
5 
5 


9 




62 




28 




10 
2 


53 




5 






1 




2 




21 










735 


175 


181 


33 


25 


142 


179 







286 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department of Aguadilla— Continued. 

FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 



Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 

Moca 

Rincon 

San Sebastian 

The department 



Total. 



32 
179 
54 
231 
12 
16 
63 



A & h ' Trade 
ture, d 

fi *enes, ; transpor . 
mining. tation 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



23 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



135 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



FOREIGN WHITE FEMALES. 





9 
40 
28 
46 
5 
1 
19 












9 










1 


1 
2 

3 

1 


38 










26 




1 






1 


41 








4 












1 














19 


















148 


1 






2 


7 


138 











COLORED, BOTH SEXES. 



Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 

Moca 

Rincon 

San Sebastian 

The department 



1,691 
4,179 
1,914 
2,354 
1,452 
980 
1,777 



14,347 



439 

575 
489 
527 
280 
193 
428 



2,931 



11 
127 
9 
8 
6 
16 
12 



189 



30 
332 
72 
54 
11 
15 
66 



88 
568 
219 
218 
62 
92 
120 



COLORED MALES. 



Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 

Moca 

Rincon 

San Sebastian 



The department. 



807 
1,928 
886 
1,138 
689 
503 
910 



6,861 



417 
574 
486 
527 
274 
190 
419 



10 
122 



169 



23 
234 
32 
51 
10 
15 
52 



189 
18 
79 
29 
52 
10 



COLORED FEMALES. 





884 

2,251 

1,028 

1,216 

763 

477 

867 


22 
1 
3 


1 
5 
2 


7 
98 
40 

3 

1 




80 
379 
201 
139 
33 
40 
110 


774 




2 


1 766 




782 




1 


1,073 
723 




6 
3 
9 


12 






422 




14 




734 












7,486 


44 


20 


163 


3 


982 


6,274 





OCCUPATIONS. 



287 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department of Arecibo. 

TOTAL POPULATION, BOTH SEXES. 



District. 


Agricul- 
| ture, 
Total. ! fisheries, 
and 
mining. 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 




36,910 7,596 
9, 357 1 - 974 


1,017 
138 
99 
211 
101 
318 
147 
108 
760 


1,180 
133 
128 
349 

65 
543 

94 
171 
621 


75 
11 
16 
15 
13 
33 
11 
14 
33 


2,193 
595 
618 
950 
276 

1,515 
236 
272 

1,803 


24, 849 




6,506 




10, 887 
18, 115 
10,449 
13,989 
11, 309 
7,432 
43, 860 


2, 605 
4,586 
2,475 
2,257 
2,431 
1,584 
11,069 


7,421 




12, 004 


Hatillo 


7,519 




9,323 




8,390 




5,283 




29, 574 








162, 308 


36, 577 


2, 899 


3,284 


221 


8,458 


110, 869 





TOTAL MALES. 



Arecibo 

Barceloneta 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 

Utuado 

The department 



7,542 
1,970 
2,584 
4,546 
2,435 
2,229 
2,424 
1,580 
11,021 



1,013 
136 

96 
209 

98 
310 
145 
100 
495 



918 
115 

52 
212 

62 
454 

93 
130 
531 



36, 331 



192 



1,061 
326 
216 
200 
79 
735 
155 
124 
632 



o, 528 



7,803 
2, 169 
2,310 
3,894 
2,479 
3,107 
2,845 
1,634 
9,440 



35, 681 



TOTAL FEMALES. 



Arecibo 

Barceloneta 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 

Utuado 

The department 



18,507 
4,633 
5,616 
9,041 
5, 285 
7,125 
5, 637 
3,853 

21, 710 



81, 407 



262 

18 

76 

137 

3 

89 

1 

41 

90 



1,132 
269 
402 
750 
197 
780 
81 
148 

1,171 



4.930 



17, 046 
4,337 
5,111 
8,110 
5,040 
6, 216 
5,545 
3,649 

20, 134 



75, 188 



NATIVE WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



Arecibo 

Barceloneta 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 

Utuado 

The department 



5,322 
1,010 
2,330 
3,431 
1,963 
1,208 
1,972 
1,388 
9, 308 



705 
105 

92 
161 

85 
177 
116 
100 
626 



27, 932 



2,167 



723 

82 

113 

273 

54 

268 

73 

149 

467 



2, 202 



168 



1,069 
285 
501 
621 
186 
802 
165 
223 

1,219 



5,071 



17, 581 
3, 763 
6,700 
9,443 
6,289 
5,478 
6,861 
4,738 

25, 208 



86, 061 



288 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department of Arecibo — Continued. 

NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



District. 



Arecibo 

Barceioneta 

Oamuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 

Utuado 

The department 



Total. 



681 
617 
724 

863 
205 

876 

578 I 
183 I 
527 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



61,254 



5, 278 
1,010 
2,313 
3,396 
1,934 
1,193 
1,967 
1,384 
9,265 



27, 740 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



702 
104 

89 
160 

82 
171 
114 

93 
386 



1,901 



Manu 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



544 
70 
40 

158 
51 

210 
72 

114 

394 



1,653 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



560 
212 
158 
106 
49 
424 
106 
110 
421 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



2, 146 



5,549 
1,214 
2,114 
3,032 
2,078 
1,860 
2,310 
1,472 
8,040 



27, 669 



NATIVE WHITE FEMALES. 



Arecibo 

Barceioneta 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 

Utuado 

The department 



62, 347 



12, 772 


44 


2,638 




5, 023 


17 


7,079 


35 


4,385 


29 


4,079 


15 


4,619 


5 


3,428 


4 


18, 324 


43 



240 



179 

12 

73 

115 

3 

58 

1 

35 

73 



509 
73 
343 
515 
137 
378 
59 
113 
798 



2,925 



12,032 
2,549 
4,586 
6,411 
4,211 
3,618 
4,551 
3,266 

17, 168 



58, 392 



FOREIGN WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



Arecibo 

Barceioneta 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 

Utuado 

The department 



1,458 



417 


84 


146 


66 


13 


11 


154 


36 


6 


148 


53 


34 


131 


47 


6 


140 


19 


52 


39 


12 


12 


56 


13 


3 


307 


124 


59 



106 
26 
60 
21 
45 
32 
8 
27 
41 



366 



FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 



Arecibo 

Barceioneta 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 

Utuado 

The department 



323 


84 


145 


49 


13 


11 


90 


35 


6 


131 


53 


34 


80 


43 


6 


112 


19 


52 


35 


12 


12 


30 


13 


3 


271 


124 


59 



396 



53 



OCCUPATIONS. 



289 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department of Arecibo — Continued. 

FOREIGN WHITE FEMALES. 



District. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining- 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 

indus- 
tries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 


Without 
grainful 
occupa- 
tion. 




94 
17 
64 
17 
51 
28 
4 
26 
36 




1 




3 




90 










17 




1 




1 


2 


1 
1 
5 
2 


59 






16 


Hatillo 


4 








42 










26 












4 














26 












3 


33 
















337 


5 


1 


1 


5 


12 


313 







COLORED, BOTH SEXES. 



Arecibo 

Barceloneta . 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo.:.... 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 
Utuado 



11,040 
4,036 

986 
4,025 
1, 728 
5,894 
2,073 

765 
6,702 



The department I 37,249 



2,190 
951 
239 

1,102 
465 

1,030 
447 
183 

1,637 



8,244 



166 
22 

1 
16 
10 
89 
19 

5 
75 



403 



430 

47 

10 

70 

9 

259 
19 
21 

141 



1,006 



299 
74 

296 
59 

698 
67 
38 

522 



3,141 



7, 162 
2,717 

661 
2,540 
1,185 
3,813 
1,521 

518 
4,325 



24, 442 



COLORED MALES. 



Arecibo 


5,399 

2,058 

| 457 

2,080 


2,180 
947 
236 

1,097 
458 

1,017 
445 
183 

1,632 


166 

21 

1 

15 
10 
87 
19 
4 
50 


347 

41 

8 

48 

9 

228 

19 

15 

124 


3 


465 

103 

16 

62 

4 

298 

45 

3 

152 


2,238 
946 


Camuy 


1 
1 


195 

857 


Hatillo 


879 
2, 876 
1,059 

366 
3, 352 


398 




5 


1,241 
531 


Quebradillas 




161 




2 


1,392 




__l 18.5'>fi 


8, 195 


373 


839 


12 


1,148 


7,959 





COLORED FEMALES. 





5,641 
1,978 

529 
1,945 

849 
3,018 
1,014 

399 
3,350 


10 
4 
3 
5 
7 

13 
2 




83 
6 
2 

22 


1 


623 
196 

58 
234 

55 
400 

22 

35 
370 


4,924 
1,771 


Barceloneta 


1 






466 




1 




1,683 


Hatillo 




787 




2 


31 




2, 572 
990 








1 

25 


6 
17 




357 




5 




2,933 








18, 723 


49 


30 


167 


1 


1,993 


16, 483 





8490—00- 



-19 



290 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department op Bayamon. 

TOTAL POPULATION, BOTH SEXES. 



District. 



Total. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



Trade 
and 

transpor- 
tation. 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta. 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



19, 940 

11,965 

11,508 

3,804 

12, 522 

8,101 

12, 365 

13, 760 

32, 048 

7,908 

4,030 

5,683 

6,107 

10, 305 



160, 046 



3, 627 
2, 553 
2, 686 

617 
2,589 
2,045 
2,700 
2,562 

198 
1,734 

764 
1,000 
1,254 
1,935 



470 

189 
50 
55 

122 
35 

133 

300 
2,710 

125 
93 
62 
83 

187 



615 

213 
66 
68 

153 
44 

167 

280 
3,304 

266 
79 
34 
69 

165 



26,264 



4,614 



5,523 



46 

18 

12 

10 

10 

13 

19 

32 

428 

10 

10 

9 

5 

16 



1,273 
974 
344 
216 
797 
352 
709 
955 

7,387 
796 
259 
369 
301 

1,051 



15,783 



TOTAL MALES. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras . 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



9, 722 
5, 915 
5,574 
1,882 
6,287 
4,026 
6,110 
6,688 
15, 100 
3,963 
2,038 
2,821 
3,011 
5,092 



78, 229 



26, 092 



464 

187 
50 
55 

122 
36 

132 

290 
2,667 

124 
92 
57 
83 

186 



4,544 



518 

187 
58 
63 
90 
37 
83 

247 
2, 659 

131 
74 
30 
62 

134 



4,373 



39 

15 

10 

6 

7 

11 

16 

24 

370 

9 



533 
250 
192 
155 
463 
143 
254 
524 
4,045 
95 
206 
229 
212 
618 



7,919 



TOTAL FEMALES. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trunllo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



10,218 
6,050 
5,934 
1,922 
6, 235 
4,075 
0,255 
7,072 

16, 948 
3,945 
1,992 
2,862 
3,096 
5,213 



81,817 



97 

26 

8 

5 

63 

7 

84 

33 

645 

135 

5 

4 

7 

31 



1,150 



7 


740 


3 


724 


2 


152 


4 


61 


3 


334 


9 


209 


3 


455 


8 


431 


58 


3, 342 


1 


701 


3 


53 


2 


140 


1 


89 


3 


433 


100 


7,864 



OCCUPATIONS. 



291 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department of Bayamon — Continued. 

NATIVE WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



District. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



Manu 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



9,866 
4,578 
7,286 
1,019 
5,487 
6, 308 
4, 903 
4,993 
12, 391 
4,987 
912 
2,898 
2,527 
6, 055 



1,783 
888 

1,647 
160 

1,017 

1,566 

941 

819 

66 

1,054 
153 
558 
465 

1,122 



224 
112 
26 
37 
62 
25 
78 
162 
985 
99 
47 
44 
46 
130 



260 
48 
46 
. 34 
57 
26 
69 
97 

883 

200 
30 
17 
20 

103 



74, 210 



12, 239 



2, 077 



NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



29 

12 

8 

5 

9 

12 

14 

20 

216 

10 

7 

8 

3 

13 



366 



479 
154 
234 

43 
306 
230 
335 
285 
1,816 
470 

26 
150 
120 
465 



5,113 



7,091 
3,364 
5,325 

740 
4,036 
4,449 
3,466 
3,610 
8,425 
3,154 

649 
2,121 
1,873 
4,222 



52, 525 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



4,778 
2,310 
3,533 

500 
2,798 
3,148 
2,387 
2, 388 
5,541 
2,451 

445 
1,459 
1,241 
2, 922 



35, 901 



1,775 
881 

1,630 
160 

1,011 

1,555 

922 

818 

66 

1,048 
153 
550 
456 

1,121 



12, 145 



220 

112 

26 

37 

62 

25 

78 

159 

976 

98 

46 

40 

46 

129 



2,054 



198 
44 
38 
31 
32 
20 
27 
81 

622 
95 
26 
14 
20 



1,328 



6 
2 
6 

10 
12 
17 
183 
9 
5 
6 
2 
11 



232 

92 

176 

35 

235 

108 

227 

192 

1,276 

71 

18 

109 

112 



3,171 



2,331 

1,172 

1,657 

235 

1,452 

1,430 

1,121 

1,121 

2,418 

1,130 

197 

740 

606 

1,293 



16, 903 



NATIVE WHITE FEMALES. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



5,088 
2,268 
3,753 

519 
2,689 
3,160 
2,516 
2,605 
6,850 
2,536 

467 
1,439 
1,286 
3,133 



38, 309 



62 
4 
8 
3 

25 
6 

42 

16 

261 

105 

4 

3 



23 



562 



247 

62 

58 

8 

71 

122 

108 

93 

540 

399 

8 

41 

8 

177 



1,942 



4,760 
2,192 
3,668 

505 
2,584 
3,019 
2, 345 
2,489 
6,007 
2,024 

452 
1,381 
1,267 
2,929 



35, 622 



292 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department op Bayamon — Continued. 

FOREIGN WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



District. 



Total. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 

and 
persona 
service, 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



330 

100 
56 
41 
57 
30 
71 

231 
2,872 
29 
47 
35 
19 

100 



4,018 



113 
33 

14 

5 
26 

6 

25 

99 

1,243 

6 
14 
10 

7 
35 



188 



1,636 



3 
2 
4 
24 
246 
3 
6 
2 
1 
4 



333 



12 
3 

2 
4 
1 
1 
2 
7 
163 



201 



34 

26 

9 

7 

10 

6 

12 

24 

380 



534 



117 
17 

9 
21 
10 

6 

13 

53 

824 

3 
12 
11 

4 
26 



1,126 



FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



239 
84 
48 
26 
50 
25 
60 

190 
2, 190 
26 
37 
27 
16 
79 



3,097 



113 
33 
14 

5 
26 

6 

25 

96 

1,237 

6 
14 
10 

7 
35 



1,627 



4 
24 
238 
2 
6 
2 
1 
4 



324 



12 
3 
2 

3 

1 
1 
2 
4 
146 



178 



34 

25 

9 

7 

10 

6 

11 

22 

362 



512 



27 
2 
1 
7 
3 
1 
3 

20 
191 
1 
3 
3 
1 
6 



FOREIGN WHITE FEMALES. 





91 

16 
8 

15 
7 
5 

11 

41 

682 

3 

10 
8 
3 

21 


1 










90 










1 


15 












8 










1 




14 












7 














5 


Rio Grande 










1 
2 
18 


10 






3 
6 




3 

17 


33 






8 
1 


633 


Toa Alta 




2 








1 




9 


Trujillo Alto 










8 














3 


Vega Baja 








1 




20 
















921 


1 


9 


9 


23 


22 


857 







OCCUPATIONS. 



293 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 

Department op Bayamon — Continued. 

COLORED, BOTH SEXES. 



District. 



Total. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



9,744 
7,287 
4,166 
2,744 
6,978 
1,763 
7,391 
8,536 
16, 785 
2,892 
3,071 
2,750 
3,561 
4,150 



1,814 

1,655 

1,020 

453 

1,565 

470 

1,744 

1,719 

116 

663 

608 

435 

787 



81,818 13,837 



133 
44 
10 
13 
34 
4 
30 
39 

482 
20 
32 
8 
30 



331 

154 

17 

34 

93 

16 

94 

159 

2,175 

63 

43 

15 

48 

58 



901 



3,300 



760 
794 
101 
166 
481 
116 
362 
646 
5,191 
326 
223 
214 
178 
578 



10, 136 



6,701 
4,637 
3,016 
2,077 
4,805 

1. 157 

5. 158 
5,968 
8, 772 
1,820 
2,164 
2,077 
2,518 
2,703 



53, 573 



COLORED MALES. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



4,705 


1,811 


3,521 


1,634 


1,993 


1,012 


1,356 


453 


3; 439 


1,561 


853 


469 


3,663 


1,737 


4,110 


1,711 


7,369 


113 


1,486 


655 


1,556 


608 


1,335 


430 


1,754 


779 


2,091 


787 


39, 231 


13, 760 



131 
42 
10 
13 
34 
4 

29 
35 

454 
20 
32 
7 
30 
22 



296 
132 
17 
32 
55 
15 
52 
142 
1,799 
34 
42 
14 
41 
50 



2,721 



267 
133 
7 
113 
218 

29 

16 

310 

2,407 

24 
178 
115 

97 
322 



4,236 



2, 195 

1,577 

945 

744 

1,571 

336 

1,827 

1,909 

2,555 

753 

695 

768 

807 

909 



17, 591 



COLORED FEMALES. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



5, 039 
3,766 
2,173 
1,388 
3, 539 
910 
3,728 
4,426 
9,416 
1,406 
1,515 
1,415 
1,807 
2,059 



42, 587 



7 


1 


8 


4 


3 


28 


8 








5 


1 


8 




1 





38 



2 

38 

1 

42 

17 

376 

29 

1 

1 

7 



579 



493 

661 
94 
53 

263 
87 

346 

336 
2,784 

302 
45 
99 
81 

256 



5, 900 



4,506 
3,060 
2,071 
1,333 
3,234 
821 
3,331 
4,059 
6,217 
1,067 
1,469 
1,309 
1,711 
1,794 



35, 982 



294 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OP PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department of Guayama. 

TOTAL POPULATION BOTH SEXES. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



Total. 



7,977 
4,867 

19, 857 

14,442 
7, 552 
8,249 

12, 749 
8,700 
8,429 
5,731 

13,433 



111,986 



A ?,™ U H Trade 
ture, ! nd 

fls ^ es '! transpor- 
ting. tation 



1,593 
793 
4,386 
2,870 
1,878 
1,828 
2,147 
1,813 
2,388 
1,411 
3,080 



24, 187 



182 
231 
476 
257 

94 
102 
300 

93 
142 
103 
146 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



120 
291 
460 
139 

62 
111 
666 

88 
200 
183 
150 



2, 770 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



220 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



524 
274 
774 

1,272 
229 
492 

1,389 
425 
398 
422 
652 



6.S51 



TOTAL MALES. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



3,868 
2, 294 
9,840 
7,103 
3,775 
4,129 
6,146 
4,391 
4,176 
2,964 
6,530 



55,216 



1,585 
793 
4,350 
2,865 
1,876 
1,827 
2, 137 
1,777 
2,214 
1,394 
3,061 



23, stilt 



178 
231 
471 
254 

94 
101 
293 

91 
140 

97 
142 



2,092 



94 
216 
410 
370 
61 
87 
497 
83 
99 
107 
132 



2,156 



11 


125 


13 


80 


40 


274 


24 


517 


5 


114 


11 


232 


48 


711 


13 


243 


13 


68 


11 


117 


9 


360 



2,841 



TOTAL FEMALES. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



4,109 
2,573 
10, 017 
7,339 
3,777 
4,120 
6,603 
4,309 
4,253 
2,767 
6,903 



56, 770 



36 

15 

2 

1 

10 

36 

174 

17 

19 



26 
75 
50 
69 
1 
24 

169 
5 

101 
76 
18 



399 
194 
500 
755 
115 
260 
678 
182 
330 
305 
292 



4,010 



NATIVE WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



3, 325 
1,286 
8,902 
9,142 
6,557 
5,140 
6,339 
2,510 
5,579 
2,087 
5,174 



56, 041 



645 

207 
1,854 
1,921 
1,608 
1,150 
1,085 

544 
1,545 

521 
1,158 



12,238 



90 
289 
171 
76 
68 
184 
40 
98 
58 
97 



1,257 



60 
52 

220 

215 
50 
61 

288 
24 

137 
75 
67 



1,249 



12 


163 


9 


50 


29 


226 


18 


520 


4 


176 


12 


240 


43 


499 


12 


62 


13 


210 


6 


101 


8 


176 



2,423 



OCCUPATIONS. 



295 



Table XXIII. — Grand (/roup* of occupations — Continued. 
Department of Guayama— Continued. 

NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



District. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



Total. 



1,602 
608 
4,413 
4,455 
3, 250 
2, 561 
3,102 
1,281 
2,754 
1,093 
2, 500 



27, 619 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



644 

207 
1,838 
1,913 
1,606 
1,150 
1,076 

528 
1,422 

519 
1,149 



12, 052 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



84 
90 
287 
169 
76 
67 
182 
40 
97 
58 
97 



1,247 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



45 
30 
181 
165 
49. 
45 
182 
21 
57 
33 
53 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



150 



Domestic 

and 
personal 

service. 



59 
24 
149 
196 
96 
140 
322 
52 
39 
43 
126 



1,246 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



760 

249 
1,932 
1,995 
1,419 
1,148 
1,302 

629 
1,127 

435 
1,067 



12, 063 



NATIVE WHITE FEMALES. 





1,723 
678 
4,489 
4,687 
3,307 
2, 579 
3,237 
1,229 
2,825 
994 
2,674 


1 


2 


15 
22 
39 
50 

1 

16 
106 

3 
80 
42 
14 


2 
1 
3 
1 


104 
26 
77 

324 
80 

100 

177 
10 

171 
58 
50 


1,599 




629 




16 
8 
2 


2 
2 

1 

2 


4, 352 




4,302 




3,224 




1 

5 
1 
1 
1 


2,461 




9 
16 
123 
2 
9 


2,938 




1,199 




1 


2,449 




891 






2,601 












28, 422 


186 


10 


388 


16 


1,177 


26, 645 







FOREIGN WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



36 
59 
163 
116 
32 
27 
138 
25 
53 
59 
56 



85 



FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



32 
43 
136 
104 
30 
24 
115 
23 
50 
50 
46 



653 



149 



53 



296 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department op Guayama — Continued. 

FOREIGN WHITE FEMALES. 



District. 


Totai. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining, 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 


Proses- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 




4 
16 
27 
12 
' 2 
3 
23 
2 
3 
9 
10 












4 














16 












2 


25 








1 


1 


10 


Cidra 








2 










1 
2 




2 












21 












2 








1 






2 












9 










1 




9 














The department 


111 






2 


5 


2 


102 











COLORED, BOTH SEXES. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



4,616 
3,522 
10, 792 
5,184 
963 
3,082 
6,272 
6,165 
2, 797 
3,585 
8,203 



933 
579 

2,495 
927 
259 
670 

1,051 

1,260 
830 
882 

1,914 



55,181 11,800 



120 
134 
51 
8 
24 
59 
46 
18 
29 
29 



606 



57 

236 

226 

201 

11 

48 

359 

63 

56 

100 

79 



1,436 



359 
224 
536 
735 
47 
248 
878 
360 
185 
313 
470 



4,355 



COLORED MALES. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



2,234 
1,643 
5,291 
2,544 
495 
1,544 
2, 929 
3,087 
1,372 
1,821 
3,984 



26,944 



926 
579 

2,475 
920 
259 
669 

1,050 

1,240 
779 
867 

1,904 



11,668 



120 
131 
50 
8 
24 
54 
44 
17 
23 
25 



183 

215 

183 

11 

40 

296 

61 

36 

66 

75 



582 



1,212 



56 

115 

304 

12 

88 

377 

188 

26 

66 

228 



1,524 



COLORED FEMALES. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



2,382 
1,879 
5,501 
2,640 
468 
1,538 
3,343 
3,078 
1,425 
1,764 
4,219 



28, 237 



132 



295 
168 
421 
431 
35 
160 
501 
172 
159 
247 
242 



2,831 



OCCUPATIONS. 



297 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department of Humacao. 

TOTAL POPULATION, BOTH SEXES. 



District. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department 



Total. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



3,634 
2,973 
1,232 
2, 417 
2,323 
1,958 
1,396 
3,562 



19, 495 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



290 
364 
86 
343 
255 
174 
225 
249 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



405 
400 
107 
142 
121 
103 
253 
265 



1,796 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



198 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



1,180 
572 
377 
671 
785 
429 
727 
599 



5, 340 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



11,222 
9,958 
4,408 
7,286 
7,671 
5,928 
4,002 
9,211 



59. 686 



TOTAL MALES. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas .' 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department 



8,129 
7,099 
3,106 
5,388 
5,589 
4, 283 
3,407 
6,983 



43,984 



3,609 
2,951 
1,217 
2,416 
2,312 
1,956 
1,393 
3,490 



19, 344 



276 
358 
85 
328 
250 
173 
199 
245 



1,914 



312 
378 

97 
115 
107 

72 
175 
228 



1,484 



172 



154 
207 
214 
140 
378 
113 
312 
283 



1,801 



3,732 
3,166 
1,484 
2,375 
2,535 
1,960 
1,296 
2, 721 



19, 269 



TOTAL FEMALES. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department 



8,653 
7,214 
3,115 
5,485 
5,574 
4,319 
3, 235 
6,922 



44, 517 



72 



312 



26 



1,026 
365 
163 
531 
407 
316 
415 
316 



3,539 



7,490 
6,792 
2,924 
4,911 
5,136 
3,968 
2,706 
6,490 



40, 417 



NATIVE WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department 



40, 246 



9,880 


2,118 


5,964 


1,080 


1,717 


327 


6,585 


1,416 


5,334 


1,111 


3,881 


862 


2,545 


457 


4,340 


968 



215 
215 

69 
212 
142 

88 
105 
158 



1,204 



228 
164 
32 
70 
48 
51 
74 
77 



603 
164 
70 
316 
245 
159 
202 
198 



1,957 



6,683 
4,306 
1,210 
4,562 
3,782 
2, 711 
1,683 
2,925 



27, 862 



NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department 



4,793 
2,924 
867 
3,220 
2,692 
1,954 
1,252 
2,144 



19,846 



2,100 

1,070 

325 

1,415 

1,104 

862 

454 

945 



8,275 



210 
211 



206 
141 



102 
156 



163 
151 
29 
51 
38 
29 
37 
62 



95 

85 

47 

75 

143 

67 

125 

165 



802 



2,194 

1,378 

391 

1,464 

1,261 

899 

514 

804 



8,905 



298 REPORT ON" THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department of Humacao — Continued. 

NATIVE WHITE FEMALES. 



District. 



Total. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



Mann 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department 



5, 087 
3,040 
850 
3, 365 
2,642 
1,927 
1,293 
2,196 



20, 400 



18 



508 
79 
23 
241 
102 
92 
77 
33 



1,155 



4,489 
2,928 
819 
3,098 
2, 521 
1,812 
1,169 
2, 121 



18, 957 



FOREIGN WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 





108 
146 
20 
45 
33 
23 
138 
46 


13 
10 
6 
15 
6 
6 
8 
7 


39 
64 

7 
12 
15 

6 
38 
17 


6 
13 
1 


9 

8 
2 
4 


8 
10 
3 
4 
1 
6 
22 
2 


33 




41 








10 


Patillas 


1 
2 

10 
5 


10 










7 
3 


53 












559 


71 


198 


38 


33 


56 


163 





FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 



FOREIGN WHITE FEMALES. 





83 
125 
19 
36 
29 
22 
96 
39 


13 
10 
6 

15 
6 
6 

8 

7 


38 
64 

7 
12 
15 

6 
38 
17 


6 
13 
1 


7 
7 
2 
4 


7 
10 
3 
3 
1 
6 
21 
2 


12 






Maunabo 








Patillas 


1 
2 

7 
5 


6 






2 




7 
3 


16 




5 








449 


71 


197 


35 


30 


53 


63 





Fajardo 


25 
21 
1 
9 
4 
1 
42 
7 




1 




2 
1 


1 


21 


Humacao 






20 












1 


Naguabo 










1 


8 


Patillas 










4 














1 








3 




1 


38 


Yabucoa 








7 
















The department 


110 




1 


3 


3 


3 


100 









OCCUPATIONS. 



299 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupation* — Continued. 
Department op Humacao — Continued. 

COLORED, BOTH SEXES. 



District. 



Total. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department 



6,794 
8,203 
4,484 
4,243 
5,796 
4,698 
3,959 
9, 519 



1,503 

1,883 

899 

986 

1,206 

1,090 

931 

2,587 



36 
85 
10 
119 



171 
223 
74 
72 
72 
50 
169 
183 



47,696 



11,085 



5S4 



1,014 



569 
398 
304 
351 
539 
264 
503 
399 



3,327 



4,506 
5,611 
3,197 
2,714 
3,879 
3,214 
2,266 
6,274 



31, 661 



COLORED MALES. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department 



3, 253 
4,050 
2,220 
2,132 
2,868 
2, 307 
2, 059 
4,800 



23, 689 



1,496 

1,871 

886 

986 

1,202 

1,088 

931 

2,538 



10, 998 



28 
83 
10 
110 
94 
79 
59 
72 



143 
214 
67 
64 
68 
41 
131 
161 



52 
112 
164 

62 
234 

40 
166 
116 



946 



1,526 
1,767 
1,093 

909 
1,268 
1,059 

767 
1,912 



10, 301 



COLORED FEMALES. 





3,541 
4,153 
2,264 
2,111 
2,928 
2,391 
1,900 
4,719 


7 
12 
13 


8 
2 


28 
9 
7 
8 
4 
9 
38 
22 


1 


517 
286 
140 
289 
305 
224 
337 
283 


2,980 




3,844 






2,104 




9 

4 

1 

23 

2 




1,805 




4 
2 

49 




2,611 






2,155 


Vieques 


3 
1 


1,499 
4,362 








24, 007 


87 


49 


125 


5 


2, 381 


21, 360 







Department of Mayaguez. 

TOTAL POPULATION, BOTH SEXES. 



Afiasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez . 

Sabana Grande 

San German 

The department 



13,311 

16,154 

3,215 

8,789 

11,279 

8, 312 

35,700 

15, 187 

10, 560 

20, 246 



127,566 



2,823 
3,494 

597 
2,242 
2,835 
2,193 
5,287 

533 
2, 465 
4,544 



266 

1,277 

35 

119 

111 

109 

2,110 

1,668 

241 

699 



4,967 



415 

1.047 

61 

67 

92 

127 

2,179 

1,685 

147 

421 



4,556 



23 

36 

3 

9 

15 
10 
194 
165 
13 
51 



354 



866 

770 

283 

254 

564 

360 

3,431 

2,609 

453 

1,350 



8,331 



8,918 
9,530 
2,236 
6,098 
7,662 
5,513 

22,499 
8,567 
7,241 

13, 181 



82, 878 



300 



REPORT OTsT THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 

Department of Mayaguez — Continued. 

TOTAL MALES. 



District. 





Agricul- 
ture, 
fisheries, 


Trade 


Manu- 
facturing 


Profes- 
sional 


Domestic 


Without 


Total. 


and 

transpor- 


and me- 
chanical 


and 
personal 


gainful 
occupa- 






tation. 


indus- 




service. 


tion. 








tries. 








6,551 


2,811 


245 


242 


17 


315 


2,921 


8,015 


3,470 


597 


376 


31 


145 


3,396 


1,602 


597 


35 


53 


3 


251 


663 


4,382 


2, 225 


119 


66 


8 


99 


1,865 


5, 692 


2,817 


108 


83 


12 


168 


2,504 


4,220 


2,163 


108 


122 


10 


158 


1,659 


17, 049 


5, 176 


2,080 


1,711 


162 


99. 


6,925 


6,765 


U59 


1,625 


l,S0i 


138 


808 


2,m 


5, 291 


2,432 


237 


112 


11 


138 


2,361 


9,948 


4,435 


654 


387 


44 


516 


3,912 


62, 750 


26, 126 


4,183 


3,152 


298 


2,785 


26, 206 



Afiasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

* City of Mayaguez . 

Sabana Grande 

San German 

The department 



TOTAL FEMALES. 



Afiasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez 

Sabana Grande .' 

San German 

The department . . . 



6,760 
8,139 
1,613 
4,407 
5,587 
4,092 
18,651 

8,m 

5,269 
10,298 



64, 816 



17 
18 
30 

111 
7U 
33 

109 



354 



21 



45 



173 
671 



5 

468 

381 

35 

34 



1,404 



551 

625 

32 

155 

396 

202 

2,436 

1,801 

315 

834 



5,546 



NATIVE WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



Afiasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez. . 

Sabana Grande 

San German 

The department 



SO, 564 



2,297 

2,716 

372 

1,662 

2,183 

1,510 

3,525 

283 

679 

1,944 



16, 888 



215 

1,056 

25 

105 

82 

75 

1,382 

1,020 

114 

381 



3,435 



866 
36 
51 
60 
68 
1,010 

738 
52 

137 



2, 568 



18 

29 

2 

8 

12 

7 

122 

97 

11 

42 



503 

468 

157 

163 

392 

215 

1,482 

1,067 

89 

340 



3,809 



NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



Afiasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez.. 

Sabana Grande 

San German 

The department 



2,286 

2,697 

372 

1,648 

2,170 

1,491 

3,460 

2h3 

677 

1,883 



195 

487 

25 

105 

81 

75 

1,371 

1,012 

113 

366 



2,818 



150 

279 

28 

50 

&3 

65 

736 

52U 

46 

119 



1,526 



14 

25 

2 

7 

9 

7 

103 

82 

10 

37 



214 



195 
114 
146 

72 
125 
104 
514 
hU8 

44 
189 



1,503 



OCCUPATIONS. 



301 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department op Mayaguez — Continued. 

NATIVE WHITE FEMALES. 



District. 



Afiaseo 

CaboRojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez. . 

Sabana Grande 

San German 

The department 



Total. 



5,327 
6,516 
925 
3,361 
4,383 
2,846 
11,457 
4,562 
1,527 
4,597 



40, 939 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



20 
569 



617 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



138 

587 

8 

1 

7 

3 

274 

21k 

6 

18 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



308 

354 

11 

91 

267 

111 

968 

619 

45 

151 



2,306 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



4,846 
4,983 
906 
3,254 
4,092 
2,713 
10, 120 
3, 665 
1,472 
4,347 



36, 733 



FOREIGN WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



Aflasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez. . 

Sabana Grande 

San German 

The department 



23 
33 
106 
162 

897 
75k 
32 
113 



1,480 



265 



19 

14 

3 

1 

17 

24 

336 

308 

6 

23 



443 



71 



15 

6 
6 

28 

41 

288 

2k9 

4 

33 



429 



FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 



Anasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez : 

City of Mayaguez 

Sabana' Grande 

San German 



The department. 



45 
19 
29 

86 
127 
635 

521 
28 
82 



1,099 



263 



19 

14 

3 

1 

17 

24 

331 

303 

6 

23 



438 



57 



118 



100 



FOREIGN WHITE FEMALES. 





8 
13 

4 

4 

20 

35 

262 

233 

4 
31 








2 
1 




6 








1 




11 










4 














4 












20 




2 








33 




5 

5 


3 
3 


11 

10 
1 
2 


24 

22 


219 






193 






3 












29 
















381 


2 


5 


17 24 


329 















302 REPOET ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XXIII. — Grand Group* of occupations — Continued. 

Department of Mayaguez — Continued. 

COLORED, BOTH SEXES. 



District. 



Auasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Horrnigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez . . . 

Sabana Grande 

San German 

The department 



Total. 



2, 756 

3,232 
1,298 
2,047 
2, 402 
2, 406 

12, 627 
6,099 
7,492 

11,262 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



45, 522 



513 

761 

219 

560 

616 

624 

1,699 

232 

1,769 

2,566 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



32 

207 

7 

13 
12 
10 
392 
320 
121 
295 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



122 

176 
25 
13 
28 
49 
1,082 

871 
93 

273 



1,861 



L"J 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



357 
300 
119 
89 
154 
119 
1,875 

i,m 

363 
1,004 



4,380 



COLORED MALES. 



Aiiasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Horrnigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez 

Sabana Grande 

San German 



1,331 

1,622 

614 

1,005 
1,218 
1, 195 
5,695 

2,471 
3, 754 
5,592 



The department [ 22,026 



512 

756 

219 

557 

611 

615 

1,653 

198 

1,738 

2,518 



9,179 



31 
96 

7 

13 
10 

9 

378 
310 
118 

2)15 



87 

93 

25 

13 

26 

47 

891 

707 

64 

257 



1,503 



114 
29 
98 
25 
25 
28 

431 

326 
93 

321 



1,164 



COLORED FEMALES. 



Anasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Horrnigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez . . . 

Sabana Grande 

San German 

The department 



1,425 
1,610 
684 
1,042 
1,184 
1,211 
6,932 
3,628 
3, 738 
5,670 



23, 496 



148 



1 
111 



162 



2 
2 
191 
16U 
29 
16 



35S 



243 

271 
21 
64 
129 
91 
444 
160 
270 
683 



Department of Ponce. 
total population, both sexes. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce. 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 



The department 203, 191 



19,484 

8,596 

8,103 

14, 845 

15, 144 

9,540 

27, 896 

12, 129 

55, 477 

27, 952 

4,858 

27,119 



4,798 
2,057 
2, 102 
3,889 
2,827 
2, 299 
6,926 
2,815 
7,953 
523 
1,005 
5,891 



42, 562 



238 

166 

52 

89 

295 

139 

514 

263 

3, 320 

2,731 

141 

580 



5, 797 



172 
203 
71 
159 
349 
170 
492 
122 
,134 
,581 
124 
642 



6,638 



14 

21 

11 

14 

34 

16 

22 

18 

210 

183 

6 

52 



1,107 
904 
359 
566 
853 
368 
748 
441 

6,939 

5,898 
213 

1,890 



14, 388 



OCCUPATIONS. 



303 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department of Ponce — Continued. 

TOTAL MALES. 



Total. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



101, 957 



237 

164 

52 

88 

293 

139 

509 

261 

3,257 

2,67 U 

135 

575 



147 

137 

62 

102 

264 

154 

410 

109 

2,997 

2,538 

123 

582 



5,710 



5,087 



12 

19 

10 

13 

31 

14 

17 

14 

183 

157 

4 

43 



360 



551 

384 

76 

174 

377 

181 

197 

155 

3,090 

2,750 

132 

925 



6,242 



4,152 
1,731 
1,715 
3,270 
3,795 
2,068 
6,065 
2,964 
10, 127 
I,, 561 
1,095 
5,347 



42,329 



TOTAL FEMALES. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



9,612 
4,107 
4,090 
7,318 
7,560 
4,698 

13, 803 
5,977 

27, 890 

It,, 755 
2,364 

13,815 



101, 234 



25 
3 
4 
9 
3 

13 

31 
166 

20 
6 



333 



25 

66 

9 

57 

85 

16 

82 

13 

1,137 

1,01,3 

1 

60 



1,551 



556 
520 
283 
392 
476 
187 
551 
286 
3,849 
3, IIS 
81 
965 



8,146 



9,003 
3,514 
3,793 
6,858 
6,991 
4,480 

13, 129 
5,506 

22, 794 

10, U75 
2, 274 

12,717 



91,059 



NATIVE WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



118, 784 



3,601 

1,442 

1,477 

2,887 

1,464 

693 

4, 294 

1,634 

4,558 

201 

316 

2,679 



25, 045 



183 

109 

45 

70 

182 

84 

383 

190 

2,129 

1,676 

89 

394 



3,858 



132 
123 

37 
129 
107 

38 
244 

67 
1,836 
1,51,9 

49 
340 



3,102 



5 
15 

9 
11 
21 
11 
13 
13 
131 
110 

6 
43 



278 



783 

401 

188 

365 

278 

72 

305 

192 

2,593 

2,089 

41 



6,157 



10, 557 
3,690 
3,831 
7,669 
5,164 
2,087 

12, 093 
4,926 

20, 006 
8,61,3 
1,105 
9,216 



80, 344 



NATIVE WHITE MALES. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros- 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce . . . 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



59,282 



3,586 

1,440 

1,473 

2,881 

1,463 

691 

4,273 

1,529 

4,551 

200 

316 

2,655 



24, S58 



182 
107 

45 

69 
182 

84 

381 

190 

2,108 

1,658 

88 
391 



3, 827 



107 
71 
29 
80 
76 
32 

207 

59 

1,278 

1,01,7 

48 

303 



2, 290 



3 
14 

9 
10 
20 
10 
12 
10 
116 
96 

4 
37 



379 

121 

63 

127 

116 

50 

89 

83 

1,373 

1,202 

19 

493 



2,913 



3,327 
1,192 
1,162 
2,451 
1,777 

649 
3,814 
1,661 
6,149 
2,561 

322 
2, 645 



25, 149 



304 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 
Department op Ponce — Continued. 

NATIVE WHITE FEMALES. 



District. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Pefiuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce . . . 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



Total. 



7,677 
2,835 
2,806 
5,513 
3,582 
1,469 
8,556 
3,490 
15, 678 
7,504 
809 
7,087 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



59, 502 



4 
6 
1 
2 
21 
105 
7 
1 



24 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



Manu 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 

indus- 
tries. 



25 
52 

8 
49 
31 

6 

37 

8 

558 

50% 

1 

37 



812 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



404 
280 
125 
238 
162 

22 
216 
109 
1,220 
887 

22 
446 



3, 244 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



FOREIGN WHITE, BOTH SEXES. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo.. 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Pefiuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



251 
94 
15 
38 
67 
70 

155 

55 

1,358 

1,182 

32 

268 



2,403 



340 



45 
40 

5 

8 
24 

7 
35 

8 

484 

U59 

14 

75 



745 



7 

11 

4 

7 

3 

1 

10 

3 

166 

Uh 

4 

18 



234 



82 
13 
2 

9 

5 

25 

38 

8 

170 

109 

5 

49 



FOREIGN WHITE MALES. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Pefiuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce. 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 



228 
86 
14 
29 
49 
55 

127 
46 

997 

81,7 
27 

228 



The department. 



45 
40 

5 

8 
23 

7 
35 

8 

479 

h5h 

14 

75 



739 



7 

10 

4 

3 

3 

1 

9 

3 

159 

138 

4 

18 



82 

13 

2 

8 

4 

25 

38 

8 

147 

87 

5 

48 



FOREIGN WHITE FEMALES. 





23 

8 

1 

9 

18 

15 

28 

9 

361 

SS5 

5 

40 


2 










21 






1 


1 
1 

2 
1 
3 
1 
10 
10 




6 


















4 


1 
1 


4 






1 


14 


Guayanilla 






14 








1 




24 


Pefiuelas 






8 






6 


6 


23 
28 


316 






292 


Santa Isabel 




5 


Yauco 








3 


1 


36 














517 


2 


6 


13 


22- 


26 


448 







OCCUPATIONS. 



305 



Table XXIII. — Grand groups of occupations — Continued. 

Department op Ponce — Continued. 
COLORED, BOTH SEXES. 



District. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



Total. 



3,972 
2, 722 
2, 501 
3,676 
7,861 
6, 485 

10, 409 
5, 052 

22, 866 

12, 502 
3,220 

13, 240 



82, 004 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



1,116 

597 

624 

995 

1,350 

1,584 

2,603 

1,159 

3,319 

279 

685 

3,145 



17, 177 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



10 

17 

2 

11 

89 

48 

96 

65 

707 

596 

38 

111 



1,194 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



33 

69 

30 

23 

239 

131 

238 

52 

2,132 

1,888 

71 

284 



3,302 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



39 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



242 
490 
169 
192 
570 
271 
405 
241 
4,176 
3,700 
167 
902 



7,825 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



2, 569 
1,547 
1,676 
2,454 
5,608 
4,447 
7,065 
3,535 
12,511 
6,020 
2,259 
8,796 



52, 467 



COLORED MALES. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



2, 060 
1,458 
1,218 
1,880 
3,901 
3,271 
5,190 
2,574 
11,015 
5,5S6 
1,670 
6,552 



40, 789 



1,108 

596 

624 

992 

1,348 

1,573 

2,593 

1,098 

3,306 

27U 

685 

3,110 



17,033 



93 
63 
670 
562 
33 
109 



33 

56 

29 

19 

185 

121 

194 

47 

,560 

,353 

71 

261 



2,576 



36 



90 

250 

11 

39 

257 

106 

70 

64 

1,570 

1,U61 

108 

384 



2,949 



817 

537 

552 

818 

2,018 

1,419 

2, 239 

1, 302 

3,890 

1,919 

773 

2,686 



17,051 



COLORED FEMALES. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



1,912 
1,264 
1,283 
1,796 
3,960 
3,214 
5, 219 
2,478 
11,851 
6,916 
1,550 
6,688 



41,215 



8490—00- 



144 



50 



13 

1 

4 

54 

10 

44 

5 

572 



•r, 



4,876 



152 


1,752 


240 


1,010 


158 


1,124 


153 


1,636 


313 


3,590 


165 


3,028 


335 


4,826 


177 


2,233 


2,606 


8,621 


2,239 


It, 101 


59 


1,486 


518 


6,110 



35, 416 



■20 



306 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity. 

PORTO RICO. 



Age period. 



Total 



Under 10 years 
10 to 14 years . . 
15 to 19 
20 to 24 
25 to 29 
30 to 34 
35 to 44 
45 to 54 



years . 
years . 
years . 
years . 
years . 
years . 



55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Total males 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Total females 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total native white . . . 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white males . . 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

65 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Native white females. 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Total. 



953, 243 



293, 949 
124, 353 
93, 148 
88,475 
84,265 
64,317 
91,802 
59, 268 
33, 716 
19, 950 



472, 261 



149, 694 
65, 112 
42, 919 
41,664 
39, 469 
31,365 
46, 430 
29, 578 
16, 758 
9,272 



480, 982 



144,255 
59, 241 
50, 229 
46, 811 
44, 796 
32, 952 
45, 372 
29, 690 
16, 958 
10, 678 



578, 009 



179, 939 
75, 638 
56, 800 
53, 983 
50, 909 
39, 317 
55, 047 
34, 724 
19, 907 
11,745 



285, 303 



91, 634 
39, 534 
25, 862 
25, 214 
23, 726 
19, 155 
27, 790 
17, 252 
9,753 
5,383 



292, 706 



88, 305 
36, 104 
30, 938 
28, 769 
27,183 
20, 162 
27, 257 
17, 472 
10, 154 
6, 362 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



198, 761 



116 

18, 452 
27, 782 
28, 441 
27, 817 
22, 084 
33, 164 
22, 032 
12, 505 
6,368 



196,893 



91 
18, 330 
27,618 
28, 301 
27, 644 
21, 916 
32, 822 
21,663 
12, 285 
6, 223 



25 
122 
164 
140 
173 
168 
342 
369 
220 
145 



122, 771 



64 

10, 861 
16, 739 
17,770 
17, 431 
13, 993 
20, 906 
13, 482 
7,634 
3,891 



121, 595 



49 
10, 784 
16, 636 
17, 685 
17, 316 
13, 892 
20, 695 
13,255 
7,490 
3,793 



1,176 



15 

77 
103 

85 
115 
101 
211 
227 
144 

98 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



24, 076 



172 

1,575 
3, 525 
4,279 
3,787 
2,970 
4, 205 
2,162 
983 
418 



22, 347 



131 

1,298 
3,207 
4,015 
3,578 
2,823 
3,986 
2,013 
911 
385 



1,729 



41 
277 
318 
264 
209 
147 
219 
149 

72 



15, 315 



54 

980 

2,477 

2, 940 

2,488 

1,877 

2,436 

1,243 

564 

256 



13, 981 



35 

755 

2,209 

2,725 

2,314 

1,768 

2,270 

1,155 

515 

235 



1,334 



19 

225 

268 

215 

174 

109 

166 

88 

49 

21 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



26, 515 



34 

1,332 
4,357 
4,758 
4,087 
3,046 
4,530 
2, 522 
1,255 
594 



'JO, 12(1 



20 
911 
2,879 
3,436 
3,062 
2,330 
3,689 
2,146 
1,103 
550 



6, 389 



14 

421 

1,478 

1,322 

1,025 

716 

841 

376 

152 

44 



13, 090 



24 

693 

2,222 

2,382 
2,015 
1,495 
2,207 
1,178 
596 
278 



9,075 



11 

395 

1,275 

1,564 

1,380 

1,070 

1,676 

959 

499 

246 



4,015 



13 

298 
947 
818 
<;:;;. 
425 
531 
219 
97 
32 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



1 
6 

84 
215 
325 
312 
547 
381 
216 
107 



1,883 



5 
52 
141 
272 
267 
509 
339 
199 
99 



311 



1,475 



63 

140 
202 
209 
384 
257 
146 
74 



1,267 



38 
94 
166 
178 
358 
233 
134 
66 



Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 
service. 



64,819 



1,347 
6, 574 
10, 242 
10, 502 
8,992 
7,181 
9, 821 
5, 762 
2,992 
1,406 



27, 415 



658 
2,611 
3,697 
4, 515 
3,941 
3,329 
4,222 
2,307 
1,359 

7"6 



37, 404 



689 
3,963 
6,545 
5,987 
5, 051 
3,852 
5,599 
3, 455 
1,633 

630 



28, 689 



565 
3, 129 
4,906 
4,893 
4, 032 
3,306 
4, 066 
2, 164 
1,089 

539 



13,560 



295 

1,378 

1, 995 

2, 276 

1,925 

1,781 

2,019 

982 

567 

312 



15, 129 



270 
1,751 
2,911 
2,617 
2, 107 
1, 525 
2,047 
1,182 
522 
197 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



307 



Table XXIV.— Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity— Continued. 

PORTO RICO— Continued. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 




11,417 


1,589 


3,795 


926 


513 


1,599 


2,995 








409 

242 

753 

1,261 

1,547 

1,411 

2,535 

1,728 

918 

613 


1 
3 

23 
63 
130 
162 
416 
384 
256 
151 








1 

10 

73 

238 

270 

243 

384 

245 

90 

45 


407 




36 
440 
627 
624 
557 
821 
438 
185 

67 


3 

29 

70 

156 

119 

268 

159 

79 

43 




190 




7 
41 
79 
77 
121 
100 
59 
29 


181 




222 


25 to 29 years 


288 




253 




525 




402 




249 


65 years and over 


278 




8,892 


1,578 


3,773 


894 


436 


1,503 


708 








210 

134 

597 

1,013 

1,252 

1,142 

2,047 

1,372 

701 

424 


1 
3 
22 
63 
130 
162 
413 
381 
253 
150 








1 

9 

69 

221 

257 

230 

364 

231 

81 

40 


208 




36 
440 
623 
620 
552 
818 
434 
184 

66 


3 

27 
66 
150 
115 

260 

155 

77 

41 




83 




3 
21 
69 
64 
110 
86 
54 
29 


36 




19 




26 




19 




82 




85 




52 




98 






Foreign white females 


2,525 


11 


22 


32 


77 


96 


2,287 




199 
108 
156 
248 
295 
269 
488 
356 
217 
189 










199 












1 
4 
17 
13 
13 
20 
14 
9 
5 


107 




1 




2 
4 
6 

4 
8 
4 
2 
2 


4 
20 
10 
13 
11 
14 

5 


145 




4 
4 
5 
3 
4 
1 
1 


203 


25 to 29 years 




262 




234 




3 
3 
3 

1 


443 




317 




197 




180 










363, 817 


74, 401 


4,966 


12, 499 


206 


34, 531 


237, 214 








113, 601 
48, 473 
35, 595 
33, 231 
31, 809 
23, 589 
34,220 
22, 816 
12, 891 
7,592 


51 

7,588 

11,020 

10, 608 

10, 256 

7,929 

11, 842 

8,166 

4,615 

2,326 


118 
559 
608 
712 
675 
536 
948 
481 
234 
95 


10 
636 

2, 106 
2,306 
1,916 
1,432 
2,055 
1,185 
580 
273 


1 
6 
14 
34 
44 
26 
42 
24 
11 
4 


781 
3,435 
5,263 
5,371 
4,690 
3,632 
5,371 
3,353 
1,813 

822 


112, 640 




36, 249 




16, 584 




14, 200 




14, 228 




10, 034 




13,962 




9,607 




5,638 




4,072 








178, 066 


. 73, 720 


4, 593 


10, 157 


180 


12, 352 


77, 064 








57, 850 
25,444 
16, 460 
15, 437 
14, 491 
11, 068 
16, 593 
10, 954 
6,304 
3,465 


41 

7,543 

10, 960 

10, 553 

10, 198 

7,862 

11, 714 

8,027 

4,542 

2,280 


96 
507 
558 
667 
644 
503 
898 
424 
212 

84 


9 

513 

1,577 

1,806 

1,532 

1,145 

1,753 

1,032 

527 

263 




362 
1,224 
1,633 
2,018 
1,759 
1,318 
1,839 
1,094 
711 
394 


57,342 




5 
11 
26 
37 
25 
41 
20 
11 

4 


15, 652 




1,721 




367 




321 


30 to 34 years 


215 




348 




357 




301 


65 years and over 


440 




185, 751 


681 


373 


2,342 


26 


22, 179 


160, 150 








55, 761 
23, 029 
19, 135 
17, 794 
17,318 
12, 521 
17, 627 
11,862 
* 6, 587 
4,127 


10 
45 
60 
55 
58 
67 
128 
139 
73 
46 


22 
52 
50 
45 
31 
33 
50 
57 
22 
11 


1 
123 
529 
500 
384 
287 
302 
153 
53 
10 


1 
1 
3 

8 
7 
1 
1 
4 


419 
2,211 
3,630 
3,353 
2,931 
2,314 
3,532 
2, 259 
1,102 

-128 


55,298 




20, 597 




14, 863 




13, 833 




13, 907 




9,819 




13, 614 




9,250 




5,337 






3, 632 







808 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OP PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XX IV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



Age period. 



Total 



Under 10 years ... 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total males 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Total females. 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total native white . . . 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white males. . . 



Under 10 years ... 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Native white femah 



Total. 



99, 645 



49 



50 



42 



Under 10 years | 13 

10 to 14 years j 5. 

15 to 19 years j 4 

20 to 24 years 4 

25 to 29 years 3 

30 to 34 years 3, 

35 to 44 years 4 

15 to 54 years 2 

55 tn 64 years 1 

65 years and over 



224 



1-J1 



;,r,:; 



776 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



23, 196 



9 

2, 255 
3,176 
3,129 
3,016 
2,697 
3,898 
2,623 
1,593 
800 



22, 902 



7 
2,247 
3,163 
3,115 
2,995 
2,671 
3,838 
2,549 
1,542 
775 



294 



20, 090 



6 
1,926 
2,667 
2,699 
2,644 
2,388 
3,453 
2,284 
1,368 
655 



19, 841 



5 

1,920 
2,659 
2,686 
2,629 
2, 366 
3,402 
2,217 
1,323 
634 



249 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



3 
149 
240 
280 
252 
215 
297 
147 
74 
30 



1,302 



75 
159 
218 
205 
180 
252 
122 

63 



385 



128 
191 
228 
194 
171 
216 
112 
58 
17 



952 



54 
112 
170 
148 
137 
175 
90 
51 
15 



Manu 
factoring 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



1,948 



3 
157 

362 
368 
282 
177 
301 
165 
87 
46 



1,307 



2 
70 
173 
237 
198 
123 
240 
139 
79 
46 



1 
87 
189 
131 
84 
54 
61 
26 



1,335 



3 
111 
257 
249 
194 
115 
203 
122 
50 
31 



857 



2 
43 
117 
150 
131 
82 
158 
99 
44 
31 



478 



1 10 
99 
63 
33 
45 
23 
6 



Profes- 
sional 

service. 



145 



125 



20 



91 



Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 
service. 



15 



116 
756 
912 
952 
721 
581 
851 
463 
190 
126 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



2, 299 



55 
341 

268 
416 
285 
255 
384 
175 
61 
59 



3,369 



61 
415 
644 
536 
436 
326 
467 
288 
129 

67 



4, 159 



97 
596 
650 
704 
532 
453 
623 
310 
101 

93 



1,779 



46 

288 
193 
325 
212 
208 
301 
124 
31 
51 



51 
308 
457 
379 
320 
245 
322 
186 
70 
42 



OCCUPATIONS. 



309 



Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA— Continued. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 




• 735 


175 


181 


33 


25 


142 


179 








26 

8 

44 

87 

115 
77 

165 
99 
67 
47 


1 








1 


24 




1 
26 
25 
34 
21 
44 
19 
6 
5 










3 
7 
24 
19 
44 
33 
26 
18 






7 
33 
23 
17 
35 
17 
7 
2 


8 




1 
4 
6 
9 
5 
6 
2 




21 


25 to 29 years 


4 
5 
8 
5 
2 
1 


26 


30 to 34 years 


9 




25 




20 




20 




19 








587 


174 


181 


33 


23 


135 


41 








15 
3 
36 
65 
91 
67 
142 
83 
49 
36 


1 








1 


13 




1 
26 
25 
34 
21 
44 
19, 

6 

5 






9 




3 
7 
24 
19 
44 
33 
25 
18 






7 
30 
22 
17 
34 
16 
6 
2 






i 

4 
6 
9 
5 
6 
2 




2 




4 
4 
7 
5 
2 
1 


3 








4 




5 




4 




8 






Foreign white females 


148 


1 






2 


7 


138 








11 
5 

8 
22 
24 
10 
23 
16 
18 
11 












11 














5 














8 












3 

1 


19 












23 


30 to 34 years . . . 








1 
1 


9 










1 
1 

1 


21 










15 




1 








16 










11 


















14, 347 


2, 931 


189 


580 


14 


1,367 


9,266 








4, 557 

1,990 

1,568 

1,315 

1,138 

828 

1,202 

857 

549 

343 


2 
329 
506 
423 
348 
290 
401 
306 
199 
127 


1 
20 
23 
27 
24 
23 
37 
16 
10 

8 






18 
160 
255 
215 
166 
111 
193 
136 
82 
31 


4,536 




46 
105 
118 
84 
56 
89 
38 
31 
13 


1 
6 
3 
1 
2 
1 


1,434 


15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 


673 
529 


25 to 29 years 


515 
346 




481 




361 






227 






164 










6,861 


2,887 


169 


417 


11 


385 


2, 992 








2,261 
989 
737 
612 
490 
383 
560 
391 
264 
174 


1 
327 
501 
422 
342 
286 
392 
299 
194 
123 








8 
53 
68 
61 
51 
30 
49 
35 
24 

6 


2,252 


10 to 14 years 


20 
21 
23 
23 
22 
33 
13 
6 
8 


27 
56 
86 
63 
35 
73 
35 
29 
13 


1 
4 
2 
1 
2 

i 


561 




87 


20 to 24 years 


18 


25 to 29 years 


10 


30 to 34 years . . . 


8 




12 




9 






11 






24 










7,486 


44 


20 


163 


3 


982 


6,274 








2,296 
1,001 
831 
703 
648 
445 
642 
466 
285 
169 


1 
2 
5 
1 
6 
4 
9 
7 
6 
4 


1 






10 
107 
187 
154 
115 

81 
144 
101 

58 

25 


2,284 




19 
49 
32 
21 
21 
16 
3 
2 




873 


20 to 24 years 


2 
4 
1 
1 
4 
3 
4 


1 


586 
511 


25 to 29 years 


505 




338 






469 






352 


55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 




216 




140 













310 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



Age period. 



Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 

service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 


162, 308 


36, 577 


2,899 


3,284 


221 


8,458 


110, 869 


51, 476 
21,505 


21 
3,145 


18 
204 






116 
784 


51,321 


163 


1 


17,208 


15, 694 


5,186 


368 


484 


7 


1,435 


8,214 


14, 887 


5, 196 


510 


558 


25 


1,570 


7,028 


14, 374 


5,446 


455 


487 


33 


1,153 


6,800 


11,174 


4,365 


377 


376 


25 


914 


5,117 


15, 617 


6, 259 


528 


610 


54 


1,307 


6,859 


9,452 


3,787 


269 


357 


44 


726 


4,269 


5,191 


2,120 


115 


159 


21 


297 


2,479 


2,938 


1,052 


55 


90 


11 


156 


1,574 


80, 901 


36, 331 


2,602 


2,567 


192 


3,528 


35, 681 


26, 191 
11, 298 


17 


17 






63 


26, 094 


3,117 


155 


76 


1 


274 


7,675 


7,030 


5,165 


335 


310 


5 


435 


780 


6, 995 


5,182 


467 


409 


16 


730 


191 


6,927 


5, 423 


403 


390 


31 


503 


177 


5,575 


4,348 


345 


316 


22 


417 


127 


8,067 


6,212 


490 


520 


50 


592 


203 


4,802 


3,738 


246 


319 


37 


304 


158 


2, 609 


2,095 


99 


141 


20 


127 


127 


1,407 


1,034 


45 


86 


10 


83 


149 


81,407 


246 


297 


717 


29 


4,930 


75, 188 


25, 285 
10, 207 


4 


1 






53 


25, 227 


28 


49 


87 




510 


9,533 


8,664 


21 


33 


174 


2 


1,000 


7,434 


7,892 


14 


43 


149 


9 


840 


6,837 


7,447 


23 


52 


97 


2 


650 


6,623 


5,599 


17 


32 


60 


3 


497 


4,990 


7,550 


47 


38 


90 


4 


715 


6,656 


4,650 


49 


23 


38 


7 


422 


4,111 


2,582 


25 


16 


18 


1 


170 


2,352 


1,531 


18 


10 


4 


1 


73 


1,425 


123, 601 


27, 932 


2,167 


2,202 


168 


5,071 


86,061 


39, 930 


19 


10 






83 


39, 818 


16, 439 


2,389 
3,920 


159 


119 




520 


13,252 


11, 871 


311 


319 


5 


927 


6,389 


11, 361 


4,073 


384 


368 


19 


994 


5,523 


10, 798 


4,128 


345 


327 


22 


690 


5,286 


8, 520 


3,369 


283 


257 


18 


521 


4, 072 


11,729 


4,796 


363 


419 


42 


734 


5,375 


6,972 


2, 906 


193 


230 


36 


361 


3,246 


3,828 


1,562 


76 


105 


17 


169 


1,899 


2,153 


770 


43 


58 


9 


72 


1,201 


61,254 


27, 740 


1,901 


1,653 


145 


2,146 


27, 669 


20, 333 


17 


9 






43 


20, 264 


8, 627 


2, 363 


119 


48 




187 


5,910 


5,284 


3,904 


279 


185 


3 


287 


626 


5, 283 


4,060 


344 


261 


14 


449 


155 


5,122 


4,110 


299 


251 


20 


296 


146 


4,209 


:■;, :;.->■) 


256 


207 


15 


270 


107 


5,981 


4,761 


327 


350 


38 


353 


152 


3,532 


2,872 


174 


203 


31 


142 


110 


1,897 


1,544 


60 


93 


16 


84 


100 


986 


755 


34 


55 


8 


35 


99 


62, 347 


192 


266 


549 


23 


2, 925 


58, 392 


19,597 


2 


1 






40 


19, 554 


7,812 
6,587 


26 
16 


40 
32 


71 
134 




333 
640 


7,342 


2 


5,763 


6,078 


13 


40 


107 


5 


545 


5,368 


5, 676 


18 


46 


76 


2 


394 


5,140 


4,311 


15 


27 


50 


3 


251 


3, 965 


5, 748 


35 


36 


69 


4 


381 


5,223 


3,440 


34 


19 


27 


5 


219 


3,136 


1,931 


18 


16 


12 


1 


85 


1,799 


1,167 


15 


9 


3 


1 


37 


1,102 



Total 

Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 vears 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total males 

Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total females 

Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total native white . . . 

Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 vears 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white males . . 

Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 vears 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white females 

Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 vears 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years' and over 



OCCUPATIONS. 



311 



Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OP ARECIBO- Continued. 



Age period. 



Total. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 

service. 



Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 
service. 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



Total foreign white 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Foreign white males . 



Under 10 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. . . 

Foreign white females 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years' and over. 



Total colored. 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Colored males 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years . . 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Colored females . 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



1,458 



31 

17 
74 
177 
179 
147 
339 
251 
131 
112 



1, 121 



17 
9 

48 
146 
141 
125 
269 
186 
104 

76 



337 



37, 249 



11, 515 
5, 049 
3,749 
3,349 
3,397 
2, 507 
3,549 
2,229 
1,232 
673 



18,526 



5,841 
2,662 
1,698 
1,566 
1,664 
1,241 
1,817 
1,084 
608 
345 



is, 723 



5,674 
2,387 
2,051 
1,783 
1,733 
1,266 
1,732 
1,145 
624 
328 

~7 



s.iM-1 



2 

754 

1,263 

1,106 

1,285 

958 

1,365 

782 

493 

236 



8,195 



752 

1,258 

1,105 

1,280 

956 

1,354 

768 

488 

234 



49 



403 



373 



;;n 



1,006 



44 
162 
183 
151 
111 
173 
108 
50 
24 



28 

122 

142 

130 

101 

152 

97 

44 

23 



33 

262 
492 
524 
433 
363 
516 
331 
116 
71 



1,148 



20 

85 

132 

232 

177 

120 

183 

129 

32 

38 



1,993 



13 

177 
360 
292 
256 
243 
333 
202 
84 
33 



312 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, rare, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Age period . 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total males 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total females 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total native white . . . 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white males . . 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white females 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Total 100,046 



Total. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



si 7 



3K.3U9 



11,573 
4,726 
4,028 
3,738 
3,531 
2,591 
3, 490 
2,237 
1,455 
940 



26,264 



24 
2, 684 
3,810 
3,685 
3,638 
2,644 
4,257 
2,898 
1,710 
914 



26, 092 



17 
2,673 
3,801 
3,679 
3,622 
2,627 
4,231 
2,870 
1,686 



12, 239 



11 
1,192 
1,636 
1,734 
1,759 
1,245 
2,024 
1,367 
856 
415 



12, 145 



5 
1,187 
1,632 
1,731 
1,754 
1,236 
2,013 
1,352 
839 
396 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



4,614 



4 
154 
723 
841 
755 
611 
875 
401 
179 
71 



4,544 



4 
152 
722 
829 
747 
602 
860 
389 
174 
65 



2,077 



1 
90 
362 
427 
356 
255 
341 
151 
67 
27 



2,054 



362 
422 
353 
250 
337 
148 
66 
26 



23 



Manu 

factoring 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 



5,523 



5 
286 
880 
957 
910 
660 
953 
494 
264 
114 



4,373 



5 
225 
648 
726 
730 
510 
776 
429 
221 
103 



1,150 



61 

232 

231 

180 

150 

177 

65 

43 

11 



1,890 



92 
328 
368 
298 
224 
301 
143 
96 
40 



1,328 



61 

214 
240 
219 
150 
217 
119 
76 
32 



31 
114 
128 
79 
74 
84 
24 
20 
8 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



63S 



1 
3 
25 
65 
105 
97 
160 
108 
51 
23 



538 



2 
14 
42 
88 
79 
146 



21 



366 



300 



Domestic 

and 
personal 
service. 



15,783 



318 
1,601 
2,218 
2,640 
2,287 
1,816 
2,368 
1,393 
809 
333 



7,919 



158 

720 

940 

1,378 

1,241 

1,008 

1,208 

658 

417 

191 



V 



160 

881 

1,278 

1,262 

1,046 

808 

1,160 

735 

392 

142 



5, 113 



94 
566 
792 
923 
764 
620 
742 
331 
172 
109 



3,171 



307 
448 
576 
490 
428 
482 
198 
110 
84 



46 
259 
344 
347 
274 
192 
260 
133 
62 
25 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



313 



Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON— Continued. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 
and 

personal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 


Total foreigi 




4,018 


188 


1,636 


333 


201 


534 


1,126 










177 
111 
368 
487 
579 
542 
888 
489 
241 
136 












177 


10 to 14 3 
15 to 19 3 
20 to 24 3 
25 to 29 -\ 
30 to 34 3 
35 to 44 3 
45 to 54 J 
55 to 64 3 
65 years 

Foreign wh 

Under 1( 
10 to 14 ^ 
15 to 19 i 
20 to 24 3 
25 to 29 i 
30 to 34 J 
35 to 44 i 
45 to 54 ; 
55- to 64 : 
65 years 






27 
254 
284 
262 
250 
334 
150 
55 
20 


3 

13 
26 
70 
47 
95 
49 
21 

9 




5 
14 
69 
98 
91 
137 
80 
31 

9 


76 




4 
12 
14 
21 
59 
34 
35 

9 


3 
11 
36 
34 
58 
37 
16 

6 


80 




85 




99 




99 




205 




139 




83 




83 






3,097 


187 


1,627 


324 


178 


512 


269 






83 
64. 
307 
400 
477 
443 
691 
369 
178 
85 












83 






27 
254 
280 
260 
250 
333 
149 
54 
20 


3 
12 
25 
69 
47 
91 
48 
20 

9 




4 
14 
66 
95 
88 
131 
75 
30 
9 


30 




4 
12 
14 
21 
59 
33 
35 

9 


2 
8 
31 
28 
53 
34 
16 
6 


21 




9 




8 




9 




24 




30 




23 




32 






Foreign white females 


921 


1 


9 


9 


23 


22 


857 


Under 1 
10 to 14 ' 
15 to 19 ; 
20 to 24 
25 to 29 ; 
30 to 34 ; 
35 to 44 ' 
45 to 54 
55 to 64 ; 
65 years 

Total colore 

Under 1 
10 to 14 




94 
47 
61 
87 
102 
99 
197 
120 
63 
51 












94 












1 


46 








1 
1 
1 


1 
3 
5 
6 
5 
3 


59 






4 
2 


3 
3 

3 
6 

5 
1 


76 






91 






90 






1 


181 




1 


1 

1 


1 
1 


109 




60 








51 


d 














81, 818 


13, 837 


901 


3,300 


71 


10, 136 


53, 573 






25, 526 
10, 721 
8,013 
7,545 
7,294 
5,251 
7,665 
4,997 
2,958 
1,848 


13 

1,492 
2,170 
1,939 
1,865 
1,378 
2,174 
1,497 
819 


3 
37 
107 
130 
137 
106 
200 
100 
R7 


5 
191 
539 
563 
542 
389 
557 
302 
147 
65 


1 
3 
2 

15 

18 

7 

16 

9 


224 

1,030 

1,412 

1,648 

1,425 

1,105 

1,489 

982 

606 

215 


25, 280 




7,968 


15 to 19 




3,783 


20 to 24 




3,250 


25 to 29 




3, 307 


30 to 34 




2,266 


35 to 44 




3,229 


45 to 54 




2,107 


55 to 64 
65 years 

Colored ma 

Under 1 
10 to 14 
15 to 19 
20 to 24 
25 to 29 
30 to 34 
35 to 44 
45 to 54 
55 to 64 
65 years 

Colored fen 

Under 1 
10 to 14 
15 to 19 
20 to 24 
25 to 29 
30 to 34 


years 


1,329 


490 24 




1,054 








39, 231 


13,760 


863 


2,721 


60 


4,236 


17,591 






12, 832 
5,606 
3,720 
3,404 
3,230 
2,356 
3,563 
2,354 
1,363 
803 


12 
1,486 
2,165 
1,936 
1,854 
1,370 
2,159 
1,485 
812 
481 


3 

36 

106 

127 

134 

102 

190 

92 

54 

19 


5 
161 
422 
461 
442 
313 
468 
262 
125 
62 




110 
409 


12, 702 




9 


3,512 




2 478 


547 




10 
15 

7 
16 
8 


736 
656 
492 
595 
385 
277 
98 


134 




129 




72 




135 




122 




95 






143 








42, 587 


77 


38 


579 


11 


5,900 


35, 982 






12, 694 
5,115 
4,293 
4,141 
4,064 
2, 895 
4,102 
2,643 

.1,595 


1 
6 
5 
3 
11 
8 






1 
1 


114 
621 
934 
912 
769 
613 
894 
597 
329 
117 


12, 578 




1 
1 
3 
3 
4 


30 

117 

102 

100 

76 

89 

40 

22 

3 


4,456 




3,236 


years 

years 


5 
3 


3,116 
3,178 
2,194 




15 10 
12 . 8 
7 3 
9 1 -H 




3,094 


45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 


1 


1,985 
1,234 




911 






1 











314 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



Age period. 



Total. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



Mann 
factoring 
and me- 
chanical 

indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 
service. 



Total 111,986 



Under 10 years ... 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

•JO to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Total males. 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 vears and over. 



Total females. 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total native white . . . 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 vears and over. 



Native white males. 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white females 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



55 



56 



27 



(111 



28, 422 



8,754 
3, 517 
2,977 
2,805 
2,638 
1,909 
2,560 
1,658 
1,003 
601 



2,770 



220 



2, 563 
3,295 
3,367 
3, 322 
2,697 
3,937 
2. 721 
1,546 
734 



14 
144 
344 
388 
328 
242 
359 
183 
93 
31 



2 
167 
496 
497 
386 
317 
454 
224 
150 
77 



23, 



2,092 



2, 156 



2 

2,545 
3,260 
3,331 
3,285 
2, 659 
3,891 
2,659 
1,518 
719 



12 
141 
342 
384 
326 
239 
352 
175 
91 
30 



2 
131 
353 
359 
292 
246 
384 
186 
137 
66 



318 



:;i 



36 
143 
138 
94 
71 
70 
38 
13 
11 



12, 238 



1,257 



1,249 



3 
1,187 
1,567 
1,706 
1,729 
1,331 
2,078 
1,413 
805 
419 



4 

73 

234 

254 

207 

136 

192 

91 

43 

23 



79 
245 
223 
181 
146 
201 

85 



619 | 12,052 



1,247 



861 



2 
1,178 
1,544 
1,685 
1,701 
1,312 
2,049 
1,380 
792 
409 



3 

72 

233 

252 

206 

136 

190 

90 

43 

22 



54 

154 

147 

118 

101 

153 

62 

50 

22 



18(1 



388 



198 



150 



6,851 



165 

715 

1,119 

1,058 

1,026 

738 

1,085 

516 

306 

123 



2, 841 



76 
294 
396 
457 
430 
331 
448 
191 
132 



421 
723 
601 
596 
407 
637 
325 
174 
37 



40 
244 
473 
402 
364 
317 
340 
139 
79 
25 



21 

118 

2CJ 

210 

187 

194 

172 

66 

31 

21 



1,177 



19 

126 

247 

192 

177 

123 

168 

73 

48 

4 



OCCUPATIONS. 



315 



Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF GUA YAM A— Continued. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation . 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 




764 


149 


263 


85 


39 


73 


155 








24 
11 
43 
71 
88 
75 
194 
123 
77 
58 












24 




1 

2 

6 

5 

12 

•42 

42 

27 

12 


1 

32 
43 
42 
34 
60 
30 
18 

3 








9 




1 
3 

10 
7 

34 
13 
9 
8 




1 
8 
9 
6 
20 
17 
7 
5 


7 




3 
6 
2 
11 
9 
4 
4 


8 




16 




14 




27 




12 




12 




26 








653 


149 


263 


83 


34 


71 


53 








13 

6 

38 

62 

73 

64 

174 

114 

66 

43 












13 




1 
2 
6 
5 
12 
42 
42 
27 
12 


1 
32 
43 
42 
34 
60 
30 
18 

3 








4 




1 
3 
9 
7 
34 
13 
9 
7 




1 
7 
9 
6 
20 
17 
6 
5 


2 




1 

6 
1 

10 
8 
4 
4 


2 




2 


30 to 34 years 


4 

8 




4 




2 




12 






Foreign white females 


111 






2 


5 


2 


102 










11 
5 
5 
9 
15 
11 
20 
9 
11 
15 












11 














5 














5 










2 


1 


6 








1 


14 








1 

1 
1 




10 












19 










1 


8 










10 








1 




14 
















55, 181 


11, 800 


606 


1,436 


15 


4,355 


36, 969 








18, 419 
7,376 
5,194 
4,845 
4,761 
3, 586 
4,936 
3,223 
1,835 
1,006 


2 
1,375 
1,726 


10 

70 
78 


2 

88 

250 

271 

195 

164 

219 

126 

83 

38 




125 
471 
645 
648 
653 
415 


18, 280 






5, 372 




1 
2 
1 
2 


2,494 




1,655 91 


2,178 




1,588 
1,354 
1,817 
1,266 
714 
303 


79 
72 
107 
62 
32 
5 


2,245 




1,579 




5 725 


2,063 




2 

2 


360 

220 

93 


1,407 




784 




567 










26, 944 


11,668 


582 


1,212 


14 


1,524 


11,944 








9,399 
3,883 
2,347 
2,227 
2,080 
1,700 
2,390 
1,545 
936 
437 




9 

68 
77 
89 
78 
69 
102 
55 
30 
5 


2 

77 

198 

209 

165 

138 

197 

111 

78 

37 




55 
176 
169 
240 
234 
131 
256 
108 
95 
60 


9,333 




1,366 
1,714 
1,640 
1,579 
1,335 
1,800 
1,237 
699 
298 




2,196 




1 
2 
1 
2 
5 
1 
2 


188 




47 




23 




25 




30 




33 




32 




37 










28, 237 


132 


24 


224 


1 


2,831 


25, 025 








9,020 
3,493 
2,847 
2,618 
2,681 
1,886 
2,546 
1,678 
899 
569 


2 

9 
12 
15 

9 
19 
17 
29 
15 

5 


1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
3 
5 
7 
2 






70 
295 
476 
408 
419 
284 
469 
252 
125 

33 


8,947 




11 
52 
62 
30 

26 

22 

16 

5 

1 




3,176 






2,306 






2,131 






2 222 






1,554 






2,033 




1 


1,374 




752 






530 











316 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity— Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



Age period. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 

indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 



Total 

Under 10 vears . . 
10 to 14 vears.... 

15 to 19 vears 

20 to 24 vears 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total males 

Under 10 years . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total females 

Under 10 years . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total native white . . 

Under 10 years... 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Native white males . 

Under 10 years... 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years.... 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years'and over 

Native white females 

Under 10 years... 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years.... 
25 to 29 years .... 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 



88, 501 



II 



to 



246 



846 



20, 400 



6, 122 

2,528 
2,075 
1,938 
1,840 
1,408 
1,919 
1,306 
753 
511 



19, 495 



1,986 



1,796 



9 
1,940 
2,645 
2,624 
2,64* 
2,123 
3,246 
2,219 
1,346 
695 



38 
327 
248 
282 
262 
169 
300 
210 
94 
56 



1 
54 

258 
301 
268 
200 
332 
230 
98 
54 



19,344 



1,484 



6 
1,929 
2,633 
2,617 
2,637 
2,113 
3,214 
2,186 
1,328 
681 



35 
319 
246 
277 
254 
160 
286 
196 
87 
54 



41 
222 
242 
214 
152 
279 
199 

87 



151 



312 



8,339 



1,204 



744 



4 

785 

1,098 

1,135 

1,151 

929 

1,458 

933 

570 

276 



7 
161 
173 
201 
176 
108 
175 
115 
55 
33 



1 
25 
108 
121 
114 
93 
147 
79 
34 
22 



8,275 



1, 182 



2 

776 

1,092 

1,133 

1,147 

925 

1,447 

919 

563 

271 



6 
159 
173 
198 
174 
104 
170 
114 
53 
31 



19 
85 
89 
83 
64 
111 
65 
26 
18 



64 



22 



198 



26 



5,340 



135 
580 
885 
806 
710 
571 
735 
535 
270 
113 



1,801 



71 
175 
293 
288 
219 
190 
220 
207 
98 
40 



3, 539 



64 

405 
592 
518 
491 
381 
515 
328 
172 
73 



1,957 



46 

198 
333 
285 
297 
217 
265 
175 
94 
47 



26 

63 

130 

120 

86 
103 
77 
50 
25 



1,155 



20 
135 
203 
165 
175 
131 
162 
98 
44 
22 



OCCUPATIONS. 



317 



Table XXIV.— Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity— Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO— Continued. 



Age period. 


. . Manu- 
Agncul- Trade 1 factoring 

« r? TQ -' and and me ~ 
Total, fisheries, trans p r- chanical 

a . tation. indus- 
mmrng. trleg 


, Domestic Without 
lr " , and per- gainful 
sionai S onal occupa- 
service. se rvice. tion. 




559 


71 


198 


38 


33 


56 


163 




19 . 












19 
8 




23 
48 
59 


3 
3 

o 


10 . 
26 
30 
24 
48 
38 
13 
9 


2 
1 
3 

13 

10 

7 

2 


3 
3 
1 

8 
7 
6 
5 


4 

8 
2 

16 

18 
3 
3 


8 
10 








45 1 


27 




128 

126 

57 

46 


16 

28 
11 
4 










65 years and over 




Foreign white males 


449 


71 


197 


35 


30 


53 


63 . 


Under 10 years 


14 

5 

15 

40 

47 

34 

108 

112 

40 

34 












14 
5 




3 

3 

2 

4 

16 

28 

11 

4 


10 
26 
30 
23 

48 

38 

13 

9 






4 
8 
2 

14 

18 

3 

3 

3 


1 




2 
1 
3 
13 
8 
6 
2 


3 
3 


3 










7 
6 
6 
5 


10 

14 

1 

11 
















110 




1 


3 


3 


100 




5 

3 

8 

8 
12 
11 
20- 
14 
17 












5 
3 












1 


7 
8 
12 






1 


2 
1 


1 
1 
1 


2 


9 
17 
11 
16 
12 




12 

47,696 


11,085 


584 


1,014 


25 


3,327 


31,661 




15, 373 
6,415 
4, 450 
4,067 
3,974 
2,984 
4,397 
3,165 
1,789 
| 1,082 


5 31 






89 
382 
550 
517 
405 
352 
454 
342 
173 

63 


15,248 




1,155 
1,544 
1,486 
1,495 
1,190 
1,772 
1,258 
765 
415 


166 

65 
55 
■56 
37 
77 
57 
26 
14 


29 
150 

178 
153 
104 
172 
141 
57 
30 




4,683 




1 
3 
3 
3 

5 
4 
3 
3 


1, 828 
1,862 
1,298 
1,917 
1,363 
765 
557 














65 years and over 




23, 689 


10, 998 


535 


889 


20 


946 


10, 301 




7,905 
3,412 
2,111 

1,887 
1,796 
1,426 
2,118 
1,675 
924 
535 


4 
1,153 
1,538 
1,481 
1,488 
1,184 
1,751 
1,239 
754 
406 


29 
160 
63 
53 
50 
33 
68 
44 
21 
14 






45 

112 


7,827 




22 
137 
151 
130 

85 
155 
126 

55 




1, 965 






162 
164 


35 




3 
3 
2 
4 
2 
3 




102 1 20 






112 

45 
12 

2,381 


52 
46 
72 






65 years and over 


28 




24, 007 


87 


49 


125 


5 


21, 360 




7,468 
3,003 
2, 33£ 
2.18C 
2,175 
1,555 
2,27< 
1,59( 


1 

2 

6 
E 
7 

e 

21 
) 1< 

> 11 

r < 


2 
6 
2 
2 
6 
4 
9 
13 
E 
) 






44 
27C 
388 
353 
316 
250 
351 
23C 
12? 


7,421 




7 
13 

27 
2b 
19 
17 
IE 
2 
5 




2,718 




1 


1,929 
1,793 










1,826 






1 
1 

2 


1,278 

1,880 

1,311 

719 










861 






5: 


485 




54' 










1 


1 



318 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Table XXIV. — Grand group* of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Age period. 



Total 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 vears 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total males 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 vears 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 Vears 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total females 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

36 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total native white . . . 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white males . . 



Under 10 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 vears 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years ..... 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white females. 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 vears 

25 to 29 vears 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Total. 



127, 566 



36, 514 

16, 288 

13, 106 

12, 146 

11,078 

9,001 

13, 029 

8,493 

4,928 

2,983 



62, 750 



18, 581 
8,490 
6,003 
5,744 
5,071 
4,405 
6,571 
4,153 
2,352 
1,380 



<;4, S16 



17,933 
7,798 
7,103 
6,402 
6,007 
4,596 
6,458 
4,340 
2,576 
1,603 



HO, 564 



23, 149 
10,257 
8,335 
7,736 
7,108 
5, 760 
8,209 
5, 221 
2,976 
1,813 



r.'.t, (125 



11,754 
5, 318 
3,825 
3,670 
3,236 
2,820 
4,136 
2, 586 
1,425 
855 



40, 939 



11,395 
4,939 
4,510 
4,066 
3,872 
2, 940 
4,073 
2, 635 
1,551 
958 



Agricul- 
ture, 
fisheries, 

and 
mining. 



26, 480 



37 
1,705 
3,809 
3,918 
3,513 
3,074 
4,708 
3, 045 
1,726 
945 



26,126 



34 

1,678 
3,752 
3,884 
3,482 
3,042 
4,650 
2,990 
1,694 
920 



354 



16, 888 



15 
989 
2,417 
2,558 
2,269 
1,998 
3,053 
1,920 
1,065 
604 



16, 684 



13 
974 
2, 379 
2,537 
2,245 
1,981 
3,021 
1,895 
1,049 
590 



201 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 

indus- 
tries. 



4,967 



92 
428 
787 
896 
718 
566 
783 
432 
186 

79 



4,183 



61 
290 
593 
769 
633 
517 
702 
383 
163 

72 



31 

13s 
191 
127 
85 
49 
81 
49 
23 
7 



3,435 



28 

2 19 
688 
660 
521 
399 
519 
289 
126 
56 



2,818 



14 
143 
434 
560 

449 
363 

448 
251 

106 
50 



11 

106 

154 

100 

72 

36 

71 

38 

20 

6 



4,556 



17 
226 
851 
883 
637 
513 
725 
397 
212 

95 



3,152 



6 
131 
480 
577 
418 
382 
559 
318 
190 
91 



11 

95 

371 

306 

219 

131 

166 

79 

22 

4 



2, 568 



17 
153 
498 
484 
376 
279 
398 
213 
106 

44 



1,526 



6 
76 
224 

27:; 
205 
184 
27:. 
153 
90 
40 



1,042 



11 

77 

274 

211 

171 

95 

123 

60 

16 

4 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



354 



56 



Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 
service. 



8,331 



225 

719 

1,375 

1, 195 

1,085 

913 

1,332 

854 

430 

203 



2,785 



93 
196 
379 
334 
400 
350 
480 
287 
161 
105 



5,546 



132 
523 
996 
861 
685 
563 
852 
567 
269 
98 



3, 809 



71 
323 
650 
551 
533 
468 
580 
376 
175 

82 



35 

89 

212 

166 

241 

211 

250 

166 

81 

52 



2,306 



36 

234 
438 
385 
292 
257 
330 
210 
94 
30 



OCCUPATIONS. 319 

Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ— Continued. 



Age period. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 

indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 
service. 



Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 
service. 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



Total foreign white. 



Under 10 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over . 

Foreign white males . 



Under 10 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. . 

Foreign white females 



Under 10 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Total colored. 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Colored males 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



Colored females . 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



1,480 



66 
33 
82 
129 
185 
188 
309 
250 
138 
100 



37 

19 

60 

101 

147 

134 

238 

190 

102 

71 



381 



45, 522 



13, 299 
5,998 
4,689 
4,281 
3,785 
3,053 
4,511 
3,022 
1,814 
1,070 



22, 026 



6,790 
3,153 
2,118 
1,973 
1,688 
1,451 
2,197 
1,377 
825 
454 



23, 496 



6,509 
2,845 
2,571 
2,308 
2,097 
1,602 
2,314 
1,645 
989 
616 



265 



443 



39 
74 
67 
66 
104 
57 
27 
9 



39 

74 
66 
63 
103 

57 
27 
9 



9,327 



22 

716 

1,388 

1,356 

1,219 

1,047 

1,594 

1,055 

621 

309 



64 

179 

160 

162 

130 

101 

160 

86 

33 

14 



9,179 



21 

704 

1,370 

1,343 

1,212 

1,032 

1,569 

1,025 

605 

298 



47 

147 

120 

135 

118 

91 

151 

75 

30 

13 



73 
348 
391 
240 
219 
295 
160 
91 
44 



1,503 



55 
252 
296 
192 
185 
253 
141 
85 
44 



148 



358 



17 



4,380 



154 
396 
716 
631 
521 
421 
720 
458 
245 
118 



58 
107 
160 
158 
133 
119 
203 
104 
72 
50 



3,216 



96 
289 
556 
473 
388 
302 
517 
354 
173 



429 



100 



329 



28,836 



13,059 
4,633 
2,076 
1,737 
1,667 
1,263 
1,738 
1,260 
819 
584 



9,226 



6,664 
2,139 
215 
37 
27 
22 
17 
29 
28 
48 



19, 610 



6,395 
2,494 
1,861 
1,700 
1,640 
1,241 
1,721 
1,231 
791 
536 



320 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Age period. 



Total. 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 

and 
mining. 



Trade 
and 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 



transpor- chanical 
tation. indus- 
tries. 



Profes- 
sional 

service. 



Domestic 

and per 

sonal 

service. 



Total 



Under 10 years 
10 to 14 years . . 
15 to 19 years . . 



years . 
years . 
years . 
vears . 



'20 to 24 Vi 
25 to 29 y< 
30 to 34 v 
35 to 44 y 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total males 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total females 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Total native white . . . 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 vears 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white males. . . 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 

Native white females. 



Under 10 years . . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. 



203, 191 



Mil 



118 



59 



59 



957 



2*2 



12,5(12 



5,797 



6,638 



11 
4, 160 
5,861 
6,522 
6,234 
4,484 
6,859 
4,739 
2,464 
1,228 



3 

169 

815 

1,082 

1,017 

790 

1,063 

520 

242 

96 



6 

279 

1,026 

1,194 

1,117 

803 

1,155 

655 

285 

118 



42, 229 



5,710 



5,087 



4,141 
6,844 
6,493 
6,200 
4,456 
6,786 
4,671 
2, 422 
1,208 



2 

166 

810 

1,071 

1,010 

780 

1,044 

502 

234 

91 



5 
237 
693 
886 
820 
601 
931 
556 
248 
110 



333 



87 



1,551 



1 

42 

333 

308 

297 

202 

224 

99 

37 



25, 045 



3,858 



3,102 



6 
2,393 
3,434 
3, 865 
3,751 
2,733 
4,044 
2,659 
1,408 
752 



2 
120 
618 



525 
630 
292 
139 
57 



3 

114 
467 
569 
525 
381 
538 
306 
147 
52 



24,858 



3,827 



2, 290 



5 
2,386 
3, 426 
3, 853 
3,730 
2,718 
4,002 
2, 620 
1,380 
738 



2 

119 
616 
779 
685 
522 
623 
288 
136 
57 



3 
94 
296 
404 
373 
282 
412 
258 
120 
48 



1S7 



20 
171 
165 
152 

99 
126 

48 

27 
4 



14. 388 



15 
46 
55 
69 
107 
69 
40 
17 



9 
28 
44 
63 
104 
61 
36 
15 



245 



272 
1,419 
2,298 
2, 281 
2,010 
1,648 
2,143 
1,275 
690 
352 



6,242 



142 
611 
986 
912 
863 
778 
890 
485 
363 
212 



8,146 



130 

808 

1,312 

1,369 

1,147 

870 

1,253 

790 

327 

140 



6, 157 



134 
682 

1,081 
1,034 
852 
710 
782 
472 
299 
111 



2,913 



76 
326 
499 
430 
377 
384 
358 
209 
180 

74 



58 
356 
582 
604 
475 
326 
424 
263 
119 

37 



OCCUPATIONS. 



321 



Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF PONCE— Continued. 



Age period. 



Total foreign white . . . 

Under 10 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. . 

Foreign white males . . 

Under 10 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. . 

Foreign white females 

Under 10 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. . 

Total colored 

Under 10 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. . 

Colored males 

Under 10 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. . 

Colored females 

Under 10 years 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over. . 



Total. 



2,403 



66 
54 
119 
262 
342 
337 
512 
390 
207 
114 



31 

28 
93 
199 
276 
275 
425 
318 
162 
79 



82, 004 



24, 912 
10, 924 
7,932 
7,829 
7,460 
5,380 
7,960 
5,323 
2,714 
1,570 



40, 789 



12, 822 
5,739 
3,729 
3,768 
3,543 
2,511 
3,948 
2,628 
1,384 
717 



41, 215 



12,090 
5,185 
4,203 
4,061 
3,917 
2,869 
4,012 
2,695 
1,330 
853 



Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 



340 



338 



17, 177 



5 
1,767 
2,423 
2,643 
2,456 
1,712 
2,719 
2, 002 
1,004 
446 



17, 033 



3 

1,755 
2,414 
2,626 
2,443 
1,699 
2,689 
1,974 
990 
440 



144 



Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 



745 



6 
53 
103 
131 
114 
158 
117 
46 
17 



53 
103 
130 
113 
157 
114 
46 
17 



1,194 



1 

43 
144 
193 
197 
151 
275 
111 
57 
22 



1,144 



41 
141 
189 
195 
145 
264 
100 
52 
17 



50 



Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 

indus- 
tries. 



234 



3 

165 
552 
602 
551 
389 
550 
310 
121 
59 



2, 576 



2 
143 
390 
461 
410 
288 
455 
260 
111 
56 



726 



1 

22 

162 

141 

141 

101 

95 

50 

10 

3 



Profes- 
sional 

service. 



:;<.) 



Domestic 

and per 

sonal 



:-;s0 



7, 825 



138 

734 

1,193 

1,188 

1,087 

865 

1,274 

744 

371 

231 



2,949 



66 
282 
464 
427 
419 
324 
450 
221 
166 
130 



4,876 



72 
452 
729 
761 
668 
541 
824 
523 
205 
101 



Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 



52, 467 



24, 765 
8,215 
3,619 
3,198 
3, 159 
2,256 
3,132 
2, 151 
1,160 
812 



17, 051 



12, 751 

3,518 

319 

61 



35,416 



12,014 
4,697 
3, 300 
3,137 
3,091 
2, 208 
3, 052 
2, 083 
1,096 
738 



8490—00 21 



322 



REPOET ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXIV. — (•'mud groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

CITY OF PONCE. 



Age period. 



Total 

Under 10 years . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total males 

Under 10 years . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total females 

Under 10 years . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Total native white . . 

Under 10 years . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Native white males . 

Under 10 years . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years 

45 to 54 years 

55 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Native white females 

Under 10 years . . 

10 to 14 years 

15 to 19 years 

20 to 24 years .... 

25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 

35 to 44 years .... 

45 to 54 yea is 

55 to 6) years 

65 years and o\ er 



Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 


Trade 

and 

transpor- 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 




tation. 


indus- 


service. 


tion. 








tries. 








27,952 


523 


2, 731 


3,581 


183 


5,898 


15,036 


5,974 
3, 122 




2 


3 




37 


5,932 


17 


71 


171 




358 


2,505 

1,245 


3,172 


66 


388 


621 


7 


845 


3,423 


80 


493 


657 


20 


1,026 


1,147 


3,136 


97 


466 


635 


28 


907 


1,003 


2,317 


51 


387 


453 


33 


678 


715 


3,194 


93 


496 


575 


45 


984 


1,001 


1,995 


67 


266 


297 


28 


612 


725 


1,094 


40 


132 


129 


19 


320 


454 


525 


12 


30 


40 


3 


131 


309 


13, 197 


517 


2,674 


2,538 


157 


2, 750 


4,561 


3,014 
1,533 
1,428 




2 


3 




17 


2,992 
1,131 


17 


70 


140 




175 


66 


385 


411 


3 


425 


138 


1,595 


79 


486 


463 


10 


514 


43 


1,518 


93 


462 


428 


23 


469 


43 


1,089 


51 


381 


314 


32 


282 


29 


1, 511 


93 


484 


414 


43 


422 


55 


863 


66 


252 


225 


25 


241 


54 


470 


40 


124 


104 


18 


137 


47 


176 


12 


28 


36 


3 


68 


29 


14, 755 


6 


57 


1,043 


26 


3,148 


10, 475 


2, 960 










20 


2,940 
1,374 
1,107 
1,104 


1,589 




1 


31 




183 


1,744 




3 


210 


4 


420 


1,828 


1 


7 


194 


10 


512 


1,618 


4 


4 


207 


5 


438 


960 


1,228 




6 


139 


1 


396 


686 


1,683 




12 


161 


2 


562 


946 


1,132 


1 


14 


72 


3 


371 


671 


624 




8 


25 


1 


183 


407 


349 




2 


4 




63 


280 










14, 268 


201 


1,676 


1,549 


110 


2, 089 


8,643 


3,301 




2 


2 




13 


3,284 
1 426 


1,689 


2 

27 


47 
298 


65 

264 




149 
315 


1,697 


6 


787 


1,757 


34 


338 


287 


11 


382 


705 


1,526 


32 


288 


278 


13 


336 


579 


1,107 


21 


229 


193 


17 


231 


416 


1,535 


37 


259 


252 


35 


336 


616 


915 


26 


134 


130 


18 


196 


411 


513 


17 


65 


61 


8 


103 


259 


228 


5 


16 


17 


2 


28 


160 


6,764 


200 


1,658 


1,047 


96 


1,202 


2,561 


1,665 




2 

47 

297 


2 

55 

178 




6 

87 
193 


1 655 


850 


2 

27 




659 


783 


3 


85 


825 


34 


333 


190 


5 


234 


29 


734 


32 


286 


177 


12 


203 


24 


530 


21 


228 


128 


17 


118 


18 


699 


37 


256 


162 


34 


179 


31 


402 


25 


131 


98 


15 


110 


23 


205 


17 


62 


42 


8 


51 


25 


71 


5 


16 


15 


2 


21 


12 


7,504 


1 


18 


502 


14 


887 


6,082 


1,636 








7 


1,629 


839 






10 




62 


767 


914 




1 


86 


3 






932 




5 


97 


6 


148 




792 




2 


101 


1 


133 


555 


577 




1 
3 


65 
90 




113 

157 


398 


836 




1 




513 


1 


3 


32 


3 


86 


388 


308 




3 


19 
2 




52 

7 


234 


157 






148 




== 









OCCUPATIONS. 



323 



Table XXIV. — Irond groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

CITY OF PONCE— Continued. 



Age period . 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 




1, 182 


43 159 144 


54 


109 


373 








51 










51 




37 




5 
27 






1 
6 

13 
17 
18 
29 
13 
8 
4 


31 




62 
130 
169 
161 
251 
172 
106 

43 


1 
1 
6 
4 

11 
10 
9 

1 


7 


1 
6 
9 

13 
6 
8 

10 
1 


20 




61 16 
76 25 
71 | 19 
107 39 
71 | 23 
34 11 
7; 4 


33 
36 


30 to 34 years 


36 




59 




47 




34 




26 








847 


43 


154 , 138 


44 


87 


81 








22 
19 
45 
91 
128 
120 












22 






5 
27 
61 
75 
70 
106 
69 
34 

7 






1 
5 
10 
14 
15 
24 
11 
5 
2 


13 




1 
1 

6 
4 


7 

15 
25 
19 
36 
22 
11 

3 




5 


20 to 24 years . . . 


2 

7 
12 
5 

8 
9 

1 


2 




1 


30 to 34 years 






189 11 


7 




132 
78 
23 


10 
9 
1 


12 




10 




9 






Foreign white females 


335 




5 1 6 


10 


22 


292 








29 
18 
17 
39 
41 
41 
62 
40 
28 
20 










29 












18 










1 
4 
2 
1 

1 


1 
3 
3 
3 
5 
2 
3 
2 


15 








i 


31 






1 

1 
1 
2 


35 








36 






3 

1 


52 






35 






1 


24 








1 


17 














12,502 


279 


596 


1,888 


19 


3,700 


6,020 








2,622 
1,396 






1 
106 
350 
354 
332 
241 
284 
144 
57 
19 




24 
208 
524 
631 
554 
429 
619 
403 
209 

99 


2, 597 




15 


19 
63 
94 

102 
87 

130 

61 

33 

7 




1,048 




1,413 38 
1,536 45 
1, 441 59 




438 




3 
6 
3 
4 
2 
1 


409 


25 to 29 years 


388 


30 to 34 years 


1,049 

1,408 
908 
475 
254 


26 
45 
31 
14 
6 


263 




326 




267 




161 




123 








Colored males 


5,586 


274 


562 


1,353 


17 


1,461 


1,919 






Under 10 years 


1,327 
664 
600 
679 
656 
439 
623 
329 
187 
82 






1 

85 

226 

258 

226 

167 

216 

105 

51 

18 




11 

87 

227 

270 

252 

149 

219 

120 

81 

15 


1,315 




15 
38 
44 
55 
26 
15 
31 
14 
6 


18 
61 
92 

101 
83 

122 

52 

28 

5 




459 






48 


20 to 24 years 


3 

4 
3 

4 
2 

1 


12 




18 


30 to 34 years 


11 




17 




19 




12 




8 












6,916 


5 


34 


535 


2 2,239 


4,101 






Under 10 years 


1,295 
732 
813 










13 
121 
297 
361 
302 
280 
400 
283 
128 

54 


1,282 






1 
2 
2 
1 
4 
8 
9 
5 
2 


21 
124 
96 
106 
74 
68 
39 
6 
1 




589 






390 




857 
785 
610 
785 
579 
288 


1 
4 




397 


25 to 29 years 


2 


370 




252 








309 








24S 






149 




172 






115 











324 



KEPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXIV. — Grand groups of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 

CITY OF SAN JUAN. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 

indus- 
tries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 




32,048 


198 


2,710 


3,304 


428 


7,387 


18, 021 








6,610 
3,481 
3,859 
4,041 
3,567 
2,569 
3,698 
2, 198 
1,308 
717 




2 

72 

446 

527 

447 

359 

495 

231 

97 

34 


2 
193 
582 
601 
576 
393 
523 
254 
134 
46 




100 

537 

1,113 

1,388 

1,141 

863 

1,091 

651 

374 

129 


6, 506 




5 
20 
34 
39 
27 
32 
21 
15 

5 


1 

15 
42 
73 
, 67 
115 
71 
32 
12 


2,673 




1, 683 




1,449 




1,291 




860 




1,442 




970 




656 




491 








15, 100 


195 


2,667 


2,659 


370 


4,045 


5,164 








3,214 

1,712 

1,813 

1,971 

1,754 

1, 275 

1,708 

929 

50' 

220 




o 

72 

445 

518 

443 

358 

483 

222 

96 

28 


2 
173 
449 
479 
478 
304 
417 
214 
105 
38 




34 
248 
590 
855 
695 
488 
586 
310 
177 

62 


3,176 




5 
20 
33 
39 
26 
32 
21 
15 

4 


1 
9 
24 
63 
56 
109 
65 
32 
11 


1,213 




300 




62 




36 




43 




81 




97 




79 




77 








16, 948 


3 


43 


645 


58 


3, 342 


12, 857 








3,396 
1,769 
2,046 
2,070 
1,813 
1,294 
1,990 
1,269 
804 
497 










66 
289 
523 
533 
446 
375 
505 
341 
197 

67 


3,330 








20 
133 
122 

98 
89 
106 
40 
29 
8 




1, 460 






1 
9 
4 
1 
12 
9 
1 
6 


6 
18 
10 
11 
6 
6 


l,3s; : ; 




1 


1,387 




1,255 




1 


817 




1,361 






873 






577 




1 


1 


414 






Total native white 


12, 391 


66 


985 


883 


216 


1,816 


8,425 




2,879 

1,522 

1,566 

1,523 

1,260 

898 

1,272 

737 

471 

263 




1 

35 

186 

224 

172 

105 

149 

74 

29 

10 






19 
126 
311 
389 
293 
237 
252 
104 
61 
24 


2, 859 




2 
8 
13 
9 
10 
12 
6 
5 
1 


50 

181 

185 

146 

101 

121 

54 

33 

12 




1,309 




11 
24 
28 
33 
55 
36 
20 
9 


869 




688 




612 


30 to 34 years 


412 
683 




463 




323 




207 








5, 541 


66 


976 


622 


183 


1,276 


2,418 








1,418 
724 
725 
713 
551 
413 
500 
268 
164 
65 




1 
35 
186 
221 
170 
105 
147 
73 
29 
9 






7 

61 

212 

305 

214 

176 

173 

69 

44 

15 


1,410 




2 
8 

13 
9 
10 
12 
6 
5 
1 


44 
130 
126 

111 
67 
77 
39 
21 
7 




582 




6 
13 

25 
27 
51 
33 
20 
8 


183 




35 


25 to 29 years 

30 to 34 years 


22 
28 




40 




48 




45 




25 








6,850 




9 


261 


33 


540 


6,007 










1,461 
798 
841 
810 
709 
485 
772 
469 
307 
198 










12 
65 
99 
84 
79 
61 
79 
35 
17 
9 


1,449 








6 
51 
59 
35 
34 
44 
15 
12 

5 




727 








5 
11 
3 
6 
4 
3 


686 






3 

2 


653 






590 


30 to 34 years . . . 




384 






2 
1 


CIS 






415 






278 






1 


1 


IS" 







— 





== 



OCCUPATIONS. 



325 



Table XXIV. — Or and groxips of occupations by age, sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
CITY OF SAN JUAN— Continued. 



Age period. 


Total. 


Agricul- 
ture, 

fisheries, 
and 

mining. 


Trade 
and 
transpor- 
tation. 


Manu- 
facturing 
and me- 
chanical 
indus- 
tries. 


Profes- 
sional 
service. 


Domestic 
and per- 
sonal 
service. 


Without 
gainful 
occupa- 
tion. 




2,872 


16 


1,243 


246 


163 


380 


824 








124 
85 
277 
373 
430 
407 
619 
328 
148 
81 












124 






21 
194 
221 
200 
200 
245 
110 
39 
13 


3 
12 

22 
55 
34 
67 
36 
13 
4 




4 
10 
52 
71 
63 
94 
59 
21 

6 


57 






3 
8 
29 
30 
49 
29 
12 
3 


58 


20 to 24 years . . . 


70 




1 

2 

7 
1 
5 


74 


30 to 34 years 


78 




157 




93 




58 




55 










2,190 


16 


1,237 


238 


146 


362 


191 








61 
51 
235 
300 
352 
328 
462 
247 
106 
48 












61 






21 
194 
218 
199 
200 
244 
109 
39 
13 


3 
12 
21 
54 
34 
63 
35 
12 

4 




3 

10 
49 
69 
62 

88 

54 

21 

6 


24 






2 
5 
25 
25 
47 
27 
12 
3 


17 






7 




1 
2 

7 
1 
5 


4 




5 




13 




21 




17 




22 








Foreign white females 


682 




6 


8 


17 


18 


633 








63 
34 
42 
73 
78 
79 
157 
81 
42 
33 












63 












1 


33 










1 
3 
4 
5 
2 
2 


41 




3 
1 


1 
1 


3 
2 
1 
6 
5 


63 






70 


30 to 34 years 




73 


35 to 44 years 




1 
1 


4 
1 
1 


144 




72 






41 












33 


















16, 785 


116 


482 


2,175 


49 


5,191 


8,772 








3,607 
1,874 
2,016 
2, 145 
1,877 
1,264 
1,807 
1,133 
689 
373 




1 

16 
66 
82 
75 
54 
101 
47 
29 
11 


2 
140 
389 
394 
375 
258 
335 
164 
88 
30 




81 
407 
792 
947 
777 
563 
745 
488 
292 

99 


3,523 




3 
12 
21 
29 
15 
13 
14 
5 
4 


1 

1 
10 
16 

4 
11 

6 


1,307 




756 




691 




605 


30 to 34 years 


370 
602 




414 




275 






229 










7,369 


113 


454 


1,799 


41 


2,407 


2,555 






1,735 
937 
853 
958 
851 
534 
746 
414 
234 
107 




1 

16 
65 

79 
74 
53 
92 
40 
28 
6 


2 
126 
307 
332 
313 
203 
277 
140 
72 
27 




27 
184 
368 
501 
412 
250 
325 
187 
112 

41 


1,705 




3 
12 
20 
29 
14 
13 
14 
5 
3 


1 
1 
6 

13 
4 

11 
5 


607 




100 




20 




10 




10 




28 




28 




17 






30 










9,416 


3 


28 


376 


8 


2,784 


6,217 






1,872 

937 

1,163 

1,187 

1,026 

730 

1,061 

719 

455 

266 










54 
223 
424 
446 
365 
313 
420 
301 
180 

58 


1,818 


10 to 14 years 






14 

82 
62 
62 




700 






1 
3 
1 
1 
9 
7 
1 
5 




656 


20 to 24 'ears 


1 


4 
S 


671 




595 


30 to 34 years 


1 


55 ! 

58 


360 




574 






24 
16 
3 


1 


386 






258 




1 




199 











32(5 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXV. — Occupations in detail by departments. 

PORTO RICO. 



Occupation. 


Total. 


Agua- 
dilla. 


Arecibo. 


Baya- 
mon. 


Guaya- 
ma. 


Huma- 
cao. 


Maya- 
guez. 


Ponce. 




49 

4,017 

342 

36 

23 

2, 350 

734 

841 

22 

165 

48 

11 

137 

195 

5, 125 

121 

124 

1,100 

26 

75 

492 

68 

42 

1,392 

5,785 

115 

45 
455 

57 

56 
170 

21 
194 
348 

30 
706 

38 

49 

215, 742 

17, 087 

206 

44 

25 

179 

1,335 

191 

8,713 

1,145 

48 

184 

127 

287 

10 

3,743 

663 

30 
219 
305 
955 

85 
352 

92 

1,595 

4,590 

25, 946 

188 

1,708 

369 

54 

1,413 

253 

15 

50 

14 




1 

455 

10 

3 

1 

269 

81 

43 

1 

9 

8 

1 

19 

20 

672 

27 

14 

136 

1 

9 

93 


38 

695 

80 

21 

4 

376 

153 

295 

12 

29 

6 

6 

23 

16 

1,130 

49 

56 

258 

10 

22 

57 

20 

15 

258 

1,098 

48 

24 
125 
15 

5 
42 

9 
22 


3 

125 
25 


1 

344 
22 


3 

869 
112 

8 

6 
431 
142 
126 

1 
42 

1 


3 


Agents (real estate, insurance, 
etc.) 


233 


1,296 




93 






4 






1 

269 

76 

68 

1 

16 

7 

1 

16 

4 

513 

6 

10 

167 

2 

6 

46 

7 

7 

237 

590 

10 

1 
34 
9 


4 
170 
41 
61 

1 
21 

3 


7 




206 
48 
30 


629 


Barbers and hairdressers 


193 
218 




6 




11 


37 




23 






3 




10 

8 

333 

5 

8 
69 


14 

5 

450 

1 

13 

68 
1 
5 

62 
2 
5 

82 
287 

7 

2 
69 

1 

3 
14 

3 
10 

1 

2 
52 

3 


16 

81 

697 

6 

16 

221 

2 

15 

52 

8 

4 

237 

1,017 

14 

9 

53 

10 

18 

33 

5 

27 

341 

4 

113 

8 

10 

27, 286 

2, 131 

35 

9 

2 

26 

208 

19 

2, 025 

404 

41 

42 

16 

42 

2 

501 

81 

6 

34 

19 

137 

23 

49 

18 
271 
711 

4, 550 

14 

336 

12 

7 

199 

66 

1 

3 

4 


39 




61 




1,330 




27 




17 




181 




10 




1 
16 
24 

3 
23 
631 

2 


17 




166 




7 




3 

66 
669 

9 

4 

16 
8 
6 

18 
1 

14 
5 
7 

79 

5 

2 

39, 151 

2, 571 

17 

4 

1 

18 

115 

30 

1,001 

158 


5 


Draymen and hackmen 

Dressmakers and seamstresses. 
Engineers (civil) and survey- 


489 
1,493 

25 


Engineers and firemen (sta- 


5 




87 
2 
1 

11 


71 


Foremen and overseers 


12 
23 


Gold and silver workers 


15 


37 
3 




8 
1 


31 


82 








11 
111 
10 
20 
31, 763 
3,546 
64 

23 
6 

55 
390 

69 
1,593 

35 
2 

47 

41 

73 

5 

693 

227 

11 

64 

44 

164 

10 

179 

17 

374 

1,130 

5,795 

43 

277 

207 

26 

121 

11 

3 

3 

3 


2 

72 

3 

2 

25, 858 

1,965 

22 

1 

8 

7 

110 

9 

750 

153 

1 

12 

15 

39 


4 


Hucksters and peddlers 

Janitors and sextons 


68 

4 

3 

24, 946 

1,353 

10 

1 


211 

5 
12 




20, 43l 

1,594 

20 

1 


46, 307 




3,927 




38 


Literary and scientific per- 


5 




8 




10 

43 

1 

895 

20 


12 

97 

7 

518 

366 


61 


Masons 


372 




56 




1,931 


Messengers and office boys 

Miners and quarrvmen .'. 


9 

4 


17 

9 

12 

2 

284 

23 

2 
17 


11 
20 
32 


13 

7 
40 


42 




19 


Officials, Government 


49 


Officials of manufacturing 


1 


Operatives, cigar factories 


698 

57 

2 

22 

29 

217 

8 

11 

18 

231 

461 

2,881 

22 

189 

27 

9 

227 

31 

3 

24 


600 

40 

2 

22 

165 

108 

5 

17 

9 

88 

483 

2,641 

3 

234 

4 


223 
41 

2 
13 
21 
90 
16 

2 

2 

182 

329 

2, 451 

10 

142 

2 

1 

98 
23 


744 
194 


Photographers 


5 


Physicians and surgeons 


47 
27 


Policemen and watchmen 

Potters 


47 

] 

11 

7 

118 

245 

2,214 

16 

160 

11 

' 1 

103 

9 


192 
22 


Printers, lithographers, etc 

Restaurant and boarding- 


83 
21 


Sailors and boatmen. . . 


331 


Salesmen and saleswomen 

Servants 


1,231 
5,414 


Shirtmakers 


80 


Shoemakers 


370 




106 


Steam-railway employees 

Stewards and housekeepers. . . 


10 


118 

31 

4 

1 

2 


547 

82 


Stonecutters 


4 


Straw workers 


3 


is 

2 


1 




3 



OCCUPATIONS. 



327 



Table XXV .—Occupations in detail by departments — Continued. 
PORTO RICO— Continued. 



Occupation. 


Total. 


Agua- 
dilla. 


Arecibo. 


Baya- 
mon. 


Guaya- 
ma. 


Huma- 
cao. 


Maya- 
guez. 


Ponce. 




80 

1,048 

24 

809 

69 

135 

54 

34 


9 

87 


15 

106 

4 

102 

5 
13 

8 
17 


14 

179 

1 

173 

21 

30 
10 


5 

97 


19 
76 


6 
193 

7 
129 

8 

24 
14 
11 


12 




310 


Tanners 


12 




72 


90 

8 
15 
5 


80 

10 
7 
3 

1 


163 


Telegraph and telephone op- 


17 




16 
2 
3 


30 


Watch and clock makers 


12 
2 











Table XXVI. — Occupations in detail by sex, race, and nativity. 
PORTO RICO. 





Total. 


Native white. 


Foreign white. 


Colored. 


Occupations. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 




13 

4,017 

342 

36 

23 

2,337 

734 

841 

22 

165 

48 

11 

137 

195 

5, 125 

121 

124 

1,100 

26 

75 

492 

68 

42 

1,392 


36 
13 

5,785 

337 
141 

3,910 
16, 855 

i,i56 

15 
64 

60 


3 

2,688 

114 

18 

11 

1,250 

381 

220 

13 

120 

28 

4 

51 

87 

2, 335 

45 

44 

921 

16 

37 

122 

34 

31 

485 

53 

18 

215 
35 
15 
87 
17 
83 
11 
10 

305 

28 

34 

128, 819 

101 

156 
23 
14 
40 

266 

90 

4,821 

527 
13 
85 
37 

218 

5 

2, 340 

236 


33 

8 

3,579 
290 


2 

484 

1 

12 
4 

52 

26 

80 
3 

31 
1 
6 
2 

13 

143 

1 

78 

104 

9 

12 
2 
1 
8 
131 

56 

8 

6 

15 

25 

9 

3 

21 


2 


8 

845 

227 

6 

8 

1,035 

327 

541 

6 

14 

19 

1 

84 

95 

2, 647 

75 


1 


Agents (real estate, insurance, etc.) . 














5 












































! 2 

! 75 

1 

1 26 

! 368 

33 


























32 


3 

776 

6 

19 
234 

7 
16 
74 

1 
90 










2, 174 


Engineers (civil ) and surveyors 

Engineers and firemen (stationary 


115 

45 

455 
57 
56 

170 
21 

194 
11 
30 

565 

38 

49 

211,832 

232 

206 
44 
25 

179 
1,335 

191 

7,557 

1,145 

48 

169 
63 

287 

10 

3,683 

663 






























47 








20 

237 

10 

6 

SO, 659 

131 

1 

8 

2 

104 

1,022 

40 

925 

616 

33 

61 

12 

18 






28 


23 


2 


iii 








2,423 
6,687 

991 

10 
26 

36 


9 
2,354 

49 
13 
9 
35 
47 
61 
1,811 


16 
13 

12 






1,471 




10, 155 






Literary and scientific persons 

Livery-stable keepers 

Machinists 










153 




2 

2 ' 

23 2 
14 i 6 
51 










3 




32 






Officials of manufacturing corn- 


5 
54 










1,289 
406 


24 




21 






328 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXVI. — Occupations in detail by sex, race, and nativity — Continued. 
PORTO RICO— Continued. 





Total. 


Native white. 


Foreign white. 


Colored. 


Occupation. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 




30 
219 
149 
955 

85 
352 

77 

1,595 

4,565 

7,493 

188 

1,685 

369 

54 

1,401 

253 

15 


156 

15 

25 
18, 453 

23 
12 
50 

246 


16 
137 

89 
782 

45 
204 

44 

695 

3,273 

3,428 

96 

636 

180 

28 

844 

109 

2 

9 
37 
353 
5 
455 
34 
42 
26 
23 


'"' i09* 

4 

19 

7,248 

12 

6 
32 

162 


12 

72 
23 
48 
7 
17 

18 

168 

920 

122 

7 

110 

36 

16 

380 

15 

12 

3 

7 
46 

3 
65 
35 
36 
23 

1 


1 

2 

1 
68 

2 
2 

66 


2 

10 
37 

125 
33 

131 

15 

732 

372 

3,943 

85 
939 
153 

10 

177 

129 

1 

2 

36 

649 

16 

43 










46 














Restaurant and boarding - house 


9 








5 




11, 137 






11 












4 












16 




U 

80 

1,048 

24 

563 
69 

135 
54 
34 


















18 


Telegraph and telephone operators. 








57 
5 
10 

















Table XXVII. — Occupations in detail by sex and age. 



PORTO RICO. 
Males. 



Occupation. 



Actors 

Agents (real estate, insurance, etc.) 

Apprentices 

Architects and draftsmen 

Artists 

Bakers 

Barbers and hairdressers 

Blacksmiths 

Bookbinders 

Bookkeepers 

Brickmakers 

Builders and contractors 

Butchers 

Cabinetmakers 

Carpenters 

Charcoal burners 

Clergymen 

Clerks and copyists 

Commercial travelers 

Confectioners 

Coopers 

Dairymen 

Dentists 

Draymen and hackmen 

Engineers (civil) and surveyors ... 
Engineers and firemen (stationary 

engines) 

Fishermen 

Foremen and overseers 

Gardeners and florists 

Gold and silver workers 

Gunsmiths 

Harnessmakers 

Hat and cap makers 

Hostlers 



Total. 



13 
4,017 

342 

36 

23 

2,337 

734 

841 
22 

165 
48 
11 

137 

195 
5,125 

121 

124 

1,100 

26 

75 

492 

68 

42 

1,392 

115 

45 
455 
57 
56 
170 
21 
194 
11 
30 



Under 

15 
years. 



47 
173 



2 

9 

124 

12 



15 to 19 
years. 



236 

159 

2 

1 

314 



194 
5 
6 
3 



3 
25 
486 
13 

2 
153 

1 

6 
44 
10 



20 to 24 
years. 



116 
1 

3 
39 

1 

3 
30 

2 
31 

2 



5 
503 



2 
3 

509 



148 

3 

22 

6 



22 

33 
738 

19 

3 

234 

4 

7 

44 
8 
2 

270 
8 

6 

48 

5 

1 

26 

4 

35 

1 

6 



25 to 34 
years. 



4 
1,262 



13 

8 
767 



222 

7 

43 

11 

3 

37 

63 

1,469 

32 

31 

338 
12 
18 

109 
11 
14 

496 
40 

20 
107 

18 
9 

33 
3 

38 



35 to 44 
years. 



2 
975 



6 

7 

429 



121 
2 

48 
13 

2 

28 
28 
, 068 
18 
28 

192 

4 

23 

122 
11 
16 

323 
26 

8 
109 
10 
12 
32 

6 
34 

1 

6 



45 to 64 
years. 



2 

858 



11 

3 

241 



82 
4 

43 

14 

6 

39 

33 

1,036 

19 

44 

148 

4 

19 

137 

3 

6 

140 

36 



115 
15 
23 
38 
4 
46 
2 
5 



65 years 
and 
over. 



136 



6 

4 

204 

8 

16 

25 



OCCUPATIONS. 



329 



Table XXVII. — Occupations in detail by sex and age — Continued. 

PORTO RICO— Continued. 

Males— Continued. 



Occupation. 



Total. 



Under 
15 

years. 



15 to 19 

years. 



20 to 24 
years. 



25 to 34 


35 to 44 


years. 


years. 


164 


90 


14 


9 


26 


13 


54,245 


35,658 


72 


36 


64 


46 


16 


14 


7 


5 


60 


42 


332 


226 


65 


44 


2, 570 


1,686 


31 


22 


14 


4 


51 


40 


19 


20 


80 


76 


6 


2 


935 


627 


208 


162 


11 


10 


57 


81 


27 


40 


487 


196 


17 


16 


110 


40 


26 


20 


456 


374 


936 


213 


960 


405 


74 


35 


386 


246 


93 


18 


16 


13 


468 


333 


42 


38 


3 


6 


4 


3 


17 


18 


236 


169 


8 


5 


138 


155 


35 


8 


35 


27 


14 


16 


11 


7 



45 to 64 

years. 



65 years 
and 
over. 



Hucksters and peddlers 

Janitors and sextons 

Journalists 

Laborers 

Launderers 

Lawyers 

Literary and scientific persons . . . 

Livery-stable keepers 

Machinists 

Masons 

Mechanics 

Merchants 

Messengers and office boys 

Miners and quarrymen 

Musicians 

Nurses 

Officials, Government 

Officials of manufacturing com- 
panies 

Operatives, cigar factories 

Painters 

Photographers 

Physicians and surgeons 

Planters 

Policemen and watchmen 

Potters 

Printers, lithographers, etc 

Restaurant and boarding-house 
keepers 

Sailors and boatmen 

Salesmen 

Servants 

Shirtmakers 

Shoemakers 

Soldiers 

Steam-railway employees 

Stewards 

Stock raisers 

Stonecutters 

Street-railway employees 

Sugar makers 

Tailors 

Tanners 

Teachers 

Telegraph and telephone operators 

Tinners 

Watch and clock makers 

Wood choppers 



ODD 

38 

49 

211, 832 

232 

206 

44 

25 

179 

1,335 

191 

7,557 

1,145 

48 

169 

63 

287 

10 

3,683 

663 

30 
219 
149 
955 

85 
352 

77 

1,595 

4,565 

7,493 

188 

1,685 

369 

54 

1,401 

253 

15 

14 

80 

1,048 

24 

563 

69 

135 

54 

34 



18,642 

20 



3 

42 

1 

124 
861 



25 
312 

2,850 

4 

147 



29, 0*5 

44 

4 

3 

1 

11 

182 

14 

692 

174 

13 

16 

1 

8 

1 

581 

51 

1 

2 

3 

13 

10 

94 

1 
124 

1,599 

1,772 

19 

348 

57 

5 

87 

49 



5 
219 

1 
16 

6 
18 

4 

5 



83 

3 

3 

30, 824 

45 

11 

2 

4 

22 

209 

24 

1,217 

39 

10 

25 

6 

27 



752 
115 
5 
4 
17 
176 
19 
76 

4 

201 

1,393 

1,055 

47 

273 

186 

11 

237 

26 

2 

4 

14 

217 

2 

47 

17 

25 

10 

2 



6 

7 
36, 531 



13 
65 


2 
16 


9 




8 




37 


4 


278 


66 


36 


7 


,141 


127 


14 


4 


6 


1 


29 


5 


15 


2 


88 


8 


1 




524 


84 


114 


8 


3 




69 


6 


52 


8 


81 


2 


16 


3 


18 




22 


2 


355 


60 


106 


6 


376 


75 


9 




237 


48 


13 


2 


9 




240 


23 


23 


4 


4 




1 




22 


4 


134 


20 


7 


1 


170 


37 


3 




20 


2 


8 


2 


5 


1 





36 

13 

5,785 

337 

12 

x41 

3,910 

16, 855 

1,156 

15 

64 

60 

156 

15 
25 
18, 453 
23 
50 
246 




5 


5 


13 


5 


7 


1 








342 

70 


1, 325 

82 


1,195 

64 

1 

8 

411 

2,990 

197 

3 

3 


1,616 

69 

7 

27 

819 

4,893 

223 

7 

11 


781 

38 

1 

43 

645 

3,113 

132 

13 


484 

14 

2 

46 

883 

2,617 

119 

1 

30 


42 




1 




2 
477 
559 
206 

1 


2 

480 

2,493 

270 

3 


13 




195 




190 




9 




1 




6 








5 


24 


29 


45 

6 

2 

3,528 

3 

14 
74 


25 

6 

2,157 
2 
6 
29 


24 

3 

2 

2,158 

4 

5 

49 


4 


Restaurant and boarding-house 






4 

3,797 

2 

9 


4 

3,709 

7 

6 

23 


13 

2,715 

5 

9 

65 






389 








1 




6 







330 



REPORT CW THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXVIII. — Occupations in detail by sex, literacy, and superior education. 

PORTO RICO. 

Males. 



Occupation. 



Actors 

Agents ( real estate, insurance, etc. ) 

Apprentices 

Architects and draftsmen 

Artists 

Bakers 

Barbers and hairdressers 

Blacksmiths 

Bookbinders 

Bookkeepers 

Brickmakers 

Builders and contractors 

Butchers 

Cabinetmakers 

Carpenters 

Charcoal burners 

Clergymen 

Clerks and copyists 

Commercial travelers 

Confectioners 

Coopers 

Dairymen 

Dentists 

Draymen and hackmen 

Engineers (civil) and surveyors 

Engineers and firemen (stationary en- 
gines) 

Fishermen 

Foremen and overseers 

Gardeners and florists 

Gold and silver workers 

Gunsmiths 

Harnessmakers 

Hat and cap makers 

Hostlers 

Hucksters and peddlers 

Janitors and sextons 

Journalists 

Laborers 

Launderers 

Lawyers 

Literary and scientific persons 

Livery-stable keepers 

Machinists 

Masons 

Mechanics 

Merchants 

Messengers and office boys 

Miners and quarrymen 

Musicians 

Nurses 

Officials, Government 

Officials of manufacturing companies . . 

Operatives, cigar factories 

Fainters 

Photographers 

Physicians and surgeons 

Planters 

Policemen and watchmen 

Potters 

Printers, lithographers, etc 

Restaurant and boarding-house keepers 

Sailors and boatmen 

Salesmen 

Servants 

Shirtmakers 

Shoemakers 

Soldiers 

Steam-railway employees 

Stewards 

Stock raisers 

Stonecutters 

Street-railway employees 

Sugar makers ." 

Tailors 

Tanners 



Total. 



13 
4,017 

342 

36 

23 

2,337 

734 

841 
22 

165 
48 
11 

137 

195 
5,125 

121 

124 

1,100 

26 

75 

492 

68 

42 

1,392 

115 

45 

455 

57 

56 

170 

21 

194 

11 

30 

565 

38 

49 

211,832 

232 

206 

44 

25 

179 

1,335 

191 

7,557 

1,145 

48 

169 

63 

287 

10 

3,683 

663 

30 

219 

149 

955 

85 

352 

77 

1,595 

4,565 

7,493 

188 

1,685 

369 

54 

1,401 

253 

15 

14 

80 

1,048 

24 



Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 



Can read, 

but can 

not write. 



6 

1,216 

134 



1 

1,284 
132 
201 



34 


2 


99 


4 


22 


6 


1,788 


179 


105 


3 







2 
21 
243 
67 
2 
959 
2 

24 

317 

8 

36 

13 

3 

41 

10 

27 

396 



181, 102 
133 



2 

63 

502 

29 

1,205 

1,053 

36 

17 

5 

9 



,306 

256 

1 



107 
45 



15 



2,320 
14 



157 

38 

1 



63 


3 


48 


2 


56 


2 


24 


3 


950 


68 


260 


47 


6,314 


236 


43 


7 


515 


102 


28 




11 


1 


295 


11 


208 


5 


6 




3 




28 


1 


103 


28 


13 


2 



Can read 
and 
write. 



7 
2,694 

163 
36 
22 

962 

579 

603 
21 

165 
12 
11 
34 

167 

3,158 

13 

124 

1,100 

24 

50 

222 

9 

40 

385 

113 

20 
112 

48 

20 
151 

18 

146 

1 

3 

154 



With 
superior 
educa- 
tion. 



49 

28, 410 

85 

206 

44 

23 

108 

753 

161 

6,269 

78 

11 

150 

56 

278 

10 

2, 220 

369 

28 

219 

83 

905 

27 

352 

60 

577 

4,258 

943 

138 

1,068 

341 

42 

1,095 

40 

9 

11 

51 

917 

9 



115 



97 

128 

2 



168 

22 

4 

7 

4 

24 

565 



20 

7 

5 

203 

20 

38 

1 

14 

1 

10 

150 

8 

1 

13 

21 

14 

51 

1 



OCCUPATIONS. 



331 



Table XXVIII. — Occupations in detail by sex, literacy, etc. — Continued. 

PORTO RICO— Continued. 

Males — Continued. 



Occupation. 


Total. 


Can 

neither 

read nor 

write. 


Can read, 

but can 

not write. 


Can read 
and 

write. 


With 
superior 
educa- 
tion. 


Without 
superior 
educa- 
tion. 




563 
69 

135 
54 
34 






563 
69 
79 
52 
1 


299 
32 


264 






37 




49 7 


135 




2 
33 




1 
1 


53 






33 









Females. 



Actresses 

Bakers 

Dressmakers and seamstresses 

Hat and cap makers 

Housekeepers 

Hucksters and peddlers 

Laborers „ 

Laundresses 

Merchants 

Musicians 

Nurses 

Operatives, cigar factories 

Planters 

Restaurant and boarding-house keepers. 

Saleswomen 

Servants 

Shoemakers 

Straw workers 

Teachers 



36 

13 

5,785 

337 

12 

141 

3,910 

16, 855 

1,156 

15 

64 

60 

156 

15 

25 

18, 453 

23 

50 

246 






36 
6 

2, 972 

49 

8 

29 

257 

1,158 

147 

15 

21 

15 

8 

6 

19 

1,801 

16 

8 

246 


20 


7 

2,379 

266 

4 

101 

3,606 

15, 071 

961 




434 
22 


27 




11 

47 
626 

48 




10 

4 
2 
3 

7 


36 

38 

148 

8 

4 

15,727 

6 

41 


7 

7 




1 
2 
925 
1 
1 




1 
5 


1 
169 







16 
13 

5,758 

337 

12 

141 

3,900 

16,851 

1,154 

12 

57 

60 

156 

15 

24 

18,448 

23 

49 

77 



Table XXIX. — Occupations in detail by sex and conjugal condition. 
PORTO RICO. 

Males. 



Occupation. 


Total. 


Single. 


Married. 


Living to- 
gether as 
husband 
and wife 
by mutual 
consent. 


Widowed. 




13 
4,017 

342 

36 

23 

2,337 

734 

841 
22 

165 
48 
11 

137 

195 
5, 125 

121 

124 

1,100 

26 

75 

492 

68 

42 

1,392 

115 

45 
455 
57 
56 
170 


8 

1,460 

340 

11 

9 

1,161 

398 

518 

13 

65 

13 


2 
1,656 


3 

662 

2 

2 

4 

589 

109 

133 

2 

12 

15 

1 

53 

35 

1,066 

33 

6 

71 

1 

19 

126 

8 




Agents (real estate, insurance, etc.) 

Apprentices 


239 




19 

10 

536 

200 

174 

7 

83 

17 

10 

42 

54 

1,747 

22 

14 

400 

9 

29 

149 

11 

32 

294 

60 

11 
115 
35 
17 
49 


4 


Artists 




Bakers 


51 


Barbers and hairdressers 


27 




16 








5 




3 


Builders and contractors 






36 
98 

2, 040 
63 

100 

592 
15 
26 

200 
48 
8 

659 
44 

16 
194 
11 
23 
92 






8 


Carpenters 


272 




3 


Clergymen 


4 


Clerks and copyists 


37 


Commercial travelers 


1 


Confectioners 


1 




17 


Dairymen 


1 


Dentists 


2 


Draymen and hackmen 


416 

7 

17 

117 

8 

7 
21 


23 




4 


Engineers and firemen (stationary en- 


1 




29 




3 


Gardeners and florists 


9 




8 



332 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXIX. — Occupations in detail by sex and conjugal condition — Continued. 

PORTO RICO— Continued. 

Males — Continued. 



Occupation. 



Total. 



Single. I Married. 



Living to- 
gether as 
husband 
and wife 

by mutual 
consent. 



Widowed. 



Gunsmiths 

Harnessmakers 

Hat and cap makers 

Hostlers 

Hucksters and peddlers 

Janitors and sextons 

Journalists 

Laborers 

Launderers 

Lawyers 

Literary and scientific persons 

Livery-stable keepers 

Machinists 

Masons 

Mechanics 

Merchants 

Messengers and office boys 

Miners and quarrymen 

Musicians 

Nurses 

Officials, Government 

Officials of manufacturing companies. . . 

Operatives, cigar factories 

Painters 

Photographers 

Physicians and surgeons 

Planters 

Policemen and watchmen 

Potters 

Printers, lithographers, etc 

Restaurant and boarding-house keepers 

Sailors and boatmen 

Salesmen 

Servants 

Shirtmakers 

Shoemakers 

Soldiers 

Steam-railway employees 

Stewards 

Stock raisers 

Stonecutters 

Street-railway employees 

Sugar makers 

Tailors 

Tanners 

Teachers 

Telegraph and telephone operators 

Tinners 

Watch and clock makers 

Wood choppers 



21 

194 

11 

30 

565 

38 

49 

211,832 

232 

206 

44 

25 

179 

1,335 

191 

7,557 

1,145 

48 

169 

63 

287 

10 

3,683 

663 

30 

219 

149 

955 

85 

352 

77 

1,595 

4,565 

7,493 

188 

1,685 

369 

54 

1,401 

253 

15 

14 



l.( 



24 
563 

69 
135 

54 

34 



7 

98 

9 

19 

362 

15 

20 

107,604 

160 

56 

18 

7 

64 

632 

78 

3,513 

1,105 

36 

71 

21 

75 

2 

1,963 

286 

15 

45 

36 

393 

40 

234 

22 

587 

4,076 

6,977 

99 

946 

327 

21 

689 

175 

4 

8 

31 

629 

8 

155 

43 

63 

26 

17 



11 

52 

2 

4 

90 

23 

26 

61,473 

25 

127 
18 
14 
54 

339 
73 
3,010 
20 
10 
58 
33 

178 
6 

935 

166 
12 

152 
80 

438 
23 
78 
38 

523 

296 

214 
52 

403 
33 
27 

416 
39 
9 
4 
28 

244 
5 

342 
23 
41 
20 



3 

33, 666 

36 

10 

5 

2 

50 

308 

30 

750 

15 

1 
26 

5 
18 



618 

189 

3 

9 

26 

91 

19 

36 

16 

430 

147 

175 

34 

274 

5 

5 

219 

32 

2 

1 

17 

138 

9 

23 

1 

30 

3 

7 



Actresses 


36 

13 

5,785 

337 

12 

141 

3, 910 

16,855 

1,156 

15 

64 

60 

156 

15 

25 

18, 453 

23 

50 

246 


25 

9 

4,099 

238 

2 

83 

2,041 

10, 416 

780 

12 

24 

38 

88 

2 

24 

14, 473 

19 

28 

145 


7 

1 

663 

36 

1 

20 

523 

1,624 

167 

2 

15 

9 

21 

5 

1 

964 

1 

12 

66 




4 




2 

445 

44 

7 

18 

414 

2,953 

89 


1 




578 
19 


Housekeepers 


2 


Hucksters and peddlers 


20 




932 


Laundresses 


1 862 


Merchants 


120 


Musicians 


1 


Nurses 


1 

8 

25 

2 


24 




5 


Planters 


22 


Restaurant and boarding-house keepers . 
Saleswomen 


6 




1,790 


1 226 


Shoemakers 


3 




5 
2 


5 


Teachers 


33 







OCCUPATIONS. 



333 



Table XXX. — Occupations in detail by sex and place of birth. 

PORTO RICO. 

Males. 



Occupation. 



Total. 



Porto 



Ric0 - Indies 



Other 
West 



Spanish 
America, 



United 

States. 



Spain. 



Other 0ther 
vuiei ,, n]m . 

Eur °P e - tries. 



Actors > ».«...■••••..«.--.-- 
Agents (real estate, insurance, 

etc.) 

Apprentices 

Architects and draftsmen 

Artists 

Bakers 

Barbers and hairdressers 

Blacksmiths 

Bookbinders 

Bookkeepers 

Brickmakers 

Builders and contractors 

Butchers 

Cabinetmakers 

Carpenters 

Charcoal burners 

Clergymen 

Clerks and copyists 

Commercial travelers 

Confectioners 

Coopers 

Dairymen 

Dentists 

Draymen and hackmen 

Engineers (civil) and surveyors 
Engineers and firemen (station- 
ary engines) 

Fishermen 

Foremen and overseers 

Gardeners and florists 

Gold and silver workers 

Gunsmiths 

Harnessmakers 

Hat and cap makers 

Hostlers 

Hucksters and peddlers 

Janitors and sextons 

Journalists 

Laborers 

Launderers 

Lawyers 

Literary and scientific persons 

Livery-stable keepers 

Machinists 

Masons 

Mechanics 

Merchants 

Messengers and office boys 

Miners and quarrymen 

Musicians 

Nurses 

Officials, Government 

Officials of manufacturing com- 
panies 

Operatives, cigar factories . . 

Painters 

Photographers 

Physicians and surgeons 

Planters 

Policemen and watchmen 

Potters 

Printers, lithographers, etc 

Restaurant and boarding-house 
keepers 

Sailors and boatmen 

Salesmen 

Servants 

Shirtmakers 

Shoemakers 

Soldiers 

Steam-railway employees 

Stewards 

Stock raisers 

Stonecutters 

Street-railway employees 

Sugar makers 



13 

4,017 

342 

36 

23 

2,337 

734 

841 

22 

165 

48 

11 

137 

195 

5,125 

121 

124 

1,100 

26 

75 

492 

68 

42 

1,392 

115 

45 

455 
57 
56 

170 
21 

194 
11 
30 

565 

38 

49 

211,832 

232 

206 
44 
25 

179 
1,335 

191 

7,557 

1, 145 

48 

169 
63 

287 

10 

3,683 

663 

30 
219 
149 
955 

85 
352 

77 

1,595 

4,565 

7,493 

188 

1,685 

369 

54 

1,401 

253 

15 

14 

80 



11 

3,502 

341 

24 

18 

2,277 

707 

730 

19 

133 

47 

5 

132 

179 

4,903 

120 

45 

990 

17 

63 

466 

67 

34 

1,197 

55 

36 

447 
41 
27 

161 
18 

166 
11 
30 

536 

38 

39 

208, 867 

230 

159 
25 
16 

135 
1,256 

119 

5,720 

1,143 

46 

145 
49 

236 

5 

3,620 

633 

18 

144 

125 

905 

78 

330 

54 

1,370 

3,632 

7,285 

179 

1,563 

332 

38 

1,015 

238 

3 

11 

70 



1 
341 
1 
7 
4 



34 



369 

1 

3 

2 

46 

24 

49 

2 

16 

1 

5 

1 



1 
129 
21 



3 
131 



1,772 



22 

3 

6 

15 

24 

29 

1,443 

2 

1 

18 

13 

14 

3 
36 
12 

6 
32 
14 
27 

3 

9 

14 

104 

824 

88 

5 

95 

11 

11 

269 



2 
194 



93 



1! 



1 

478 

1 



3 
3 

7 
32 
18 

220 



334 



REPOET ON THE CENSUS OF POETO EICO, 1899. 



Table XXX. — Occupations in detail by sex and place of birth — Continued. 

PORTO RICO— Continued. 

Males— Continued. 



Occupation. 



Total. 



Porto 
Rico. 



Other 

West 

Indies. 



Spanish 
America. 



United 
States. 



Spain. 



0ther i coun' 
Eur °P e M tries. 



Tailors 

Tanners 

Teachers 

Telegraph and telephone oper 

ators 

Tinners 

Watch and clock makers 

Wood choppers 



1,048 

24 

563 

69 
135 
54 
34 



977 
21 
495 

34 
95 
31 
34 



15 



Females. 





36 

13 

5,785 

337 

12 

141 

3, 910 

16, 855 

1,156 

15 

64 

60 

156 

15 
25 
18,453 
23 
50 
246 


34 

13 

5, 721 

337 

10 

88 

3,887 

16, 708 

1,142 

13 

58 

60 

155 

13 

24 

18, 153 

23 

47 

177 






2 




















Dressmakers and seamstresses . . 


17 


9 




14 


10 


14 


Hat and cap makers 














2 






Hucksters and peddlers 


17 
4 

44 
1 
1 
2 






8 

2 

35 

4 


28 






1 


14 
6 
6 


2 




3 


59 






3 


Musicians 






1 








4 






Operatives, cigar factories 


















1 






Restaurant and boarding-house 






1 




1 








1 
4ft 








80 


20 


i 


53 


98 










i 

4 






2 
13 








1 


44 


1 


3 







SIZE OF FAMILIES. 



335 









Ot~ CO 












T3 • 


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en 




S 0) 








rH O 














© 


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CO 












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co i^ t lo o cn ^f 

CM CO CO CM CM CM •* 


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lO 


CM *T TT CO CM CO lO 


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lO 






00 CO CO CM lO CM [> 


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CM 




t- CO CO "3< en CM CM 
















i© CO rH rH iO CO CO 


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CM -^ "^ CO CM ^ IC 


CM 




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CM io en co en CM X 








I> CO rH -* 00 CO CM 


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CO "O © lO t^. rH CM 


lO 






lO Oi ^ 00 I> I> CO 


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CM 


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ICC lO XO I© lO -^ lO 


lO 


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Tota 

numb 

of 

famili 


CO lO lO CO © lO CO 


<o 


rH CO CM CM rH CM CO 


cc 














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OlCiOHWNCO 


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bet, cs 3 3 cS S 








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iO r* iO Oi 00 I"- CO 






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l-* 








^MOOOMOCO 








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03 


















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03 










CM CC C^ CC CM t-h CC 







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OS 00 CO CM to O <*H 














CM -** CC U7; CC rH CC 




Pn 


co 




cm" 








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C 1 x -o tO CO CO -^ 








CO -r^ CO iO CO rH t* 


CO 




lC 




cm" 














CM iO OS CO iO iQ I> 








CC iO CC iO CC t-\ -rt* 


00 








cm- 














rH OO CC iO lO -Hh CM 








CC -m* CC iO CC rH ^P 






cc 




cm" 














co r» o -tt* cm r— to 








CM CC CM CC CM CM 


l> 




cm 




rH " 














t- iO i£> cO I> CM 00 










iO 










c3 £> dj 
2 taON 


rH CM CO id CC OS l£> 

iO iO iO iO iC iO iO 




^=S'K 






rH . 






ii^g«i 






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CO 




CM CC CM CC CM rH CO 




H Pw^ 






c<= 






-, £ . 








3 


-S3 c 


LO CO 00 CO tJH %p -rt* 


o ft.2 


O I"- tT O CM to tO 


OCl 


H o-C 






P, 








































a 


















o 


















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to 














13 
cr! 


ft 

CB 


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CD 

A 




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Pi 


32 





336 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF POETO RICO, 1899. 



O 



"te» 



1 

X 

X 







OS 












• CO 1> 




•a . 
















o ir 
















*£ 
















£° 
















<N CO lO -cH lO »C> CO 


• f 


5 O 




CM 










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to 










T " H 








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CD 




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3 00 




o 
























rH 
















h^io:i r. i^ c-r : 


3 CM 




O 


























} OS 






CO t-HHt-ItH O 


3 ■* 




C7i 




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00t-cNC0-*0!0>Ot> 


3 O 


















>> 


CO 




cm" 










a 




















coo-i<ic5aoeocMr~e 


1 r~ 


oS 










COi-HCMCOT-ICMrHrtt- 




o 


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CM 


















o 






3 CM 






HOCldiHCIiOL^: 




0) 




OOCMIMCOCMCOCMr-ic: 




a, 


CO 




r co" 






















OlMCNiOOI^MHC 


1 CO 








< ** 






COCOiOCNOCOOiCOO 


1 o 














r-HCMCO^CM'^CNCMC 


I CO 






























MtOODiCiiHCOOO 








rHCMCM-^CMlOINCMe- 


















1< 






















XHINOOHTflHrtO' 


CO 




CM 




CO 
























OS 












CM-fC-OCOtXJOt^CMCV 


CO 
iC3 


tH 1 


ocooicoo'*-t<t~Lr 




OJX! H B! 






©r^oCNcecoosTfo. 




"S a .2 i 


t^HINMHNHHOt 


o 








a o 








Ol^l^iOCJiCnc7»CMC 










Tota 

popul 

tion 


oicocoi-i-^Oiccrfoi: 


CO 


CO rHrHTHr-fr-t TJ 














































a 






















CD 






















a 
























o 






















N 




















ft 


A 


C 
£ 


5 

o 

2 > 

9 s 


■- 


c 




- 


a 
> 


_3 


CD 

-a 

CD 

EH 






a 
< 


Fh 

o! 

pq 




r 




c 


= 

3- 


a 

L 





(OifJiOaCl-f HH«1<W^WTf< 



rHr-H,-H rH rH T-H CI 



MHtDCOI.--CO(MNMiCOiOCO'f 



l>^NOacO00"«*(NCO00Tj<CDtOOS 



(JDOOiOf O:i::-*00!DHOO 
COCNCM (NHlNW^ri r-t tH <N 



-f i>. io o oo -o i O "■ : i •-: 'io h m >o 



coo> Tf co iO x ci ic .ft ci co coiOio 

-t< 00 CT> O O X O O t-h X O CO CO t^ 

lOClWHCOHCOWcrjHHHHCl 



CO h- CO rf W^ O ~ 71 CO iOCO'»f 
iCHOCOHOiHQOtOOiOOJCO 
lOCOCMHCOHCOCOCJlC^HHHiN 



OHOit^i^COt^O-KNI^COW^OiM 
lO^COOiXnOaiHCDh-HHl^'Xi 
iOMWHMHNCOOHHHHW 



OiCOO^OOHiOOiCOOOl<DQOCO 

OJHt^r*aicooicoa5(NooQOWO 



tC X iC OHH X t- 0) iO t^ *<* \0 CN 

<o O TP CO Ol CO O CI X CO CO (N lO CD 



coiCoofNcoaitrJCOi-Hoocooooi'^ 

lOiCiOiOiOi-OiOiOiCiOiOiOiOiO 



WtOHOtD^fCOOHCOOONf Oi 
CO 1^ 'X CO CO X ^h "O X l^iOOOOOH 

r^ r-t as i^ -m co ci tc on co t- as rH as 

CO oTt-T Cfi-H cicNTOrH 1 r-TrH 



OiOX'+OlHiCOOOOOOMNiO 

~-t* co o o oi © co co -r 5 co xi o © 

OlOiirSCOiOHCOt^OOlOtOriCO 



0> rH rH CO 0-1 X 0-1 CO Ol l> Tfl lC CO o 

rHrHiHrHrHrHCO i-\ 



I'S o 
: x^ 

3 « 



O) CO 

O O O * -i— -i-h crt O 



3" 03 

?bjocuo 



SIZE OF FAMILIES. 



337 



t-cfli-ie<cor«-'^iO'^<i-H t^ 



ic x ic oa r- co i— i co co t^- o 



-r:i:i/. ^ i— i— I iO uo x o 

t CJ Cl X « iC -^ iC iO CO Ol 



coo-ooic:i x i- to o x 

X CO X r- I Tf< CI X X 1^ iC CI 



o 01 oc x >c ec ic co co co - 1 

OtOXOnMOHOO 'X 



O Oi X CO-— XOlOJ^iO 
aX-ft^HiOH'OiOO^ 
.-H CO Ol rH i-t Ol 1-H ^H ^H d 



X 'Xi -r" Ol CO CO i-t Ol Tf CO CN 
•X O- l-0 l.0 X X X Oi OS CM OS 
rH -* CO -— < i—( CN rH t-H i— ( CM 



OiiCcNoiiCcoicai^-aiir^ 
o) -r co x oi o. i- o- oi uc -r 

OJHiOCO^rHCOHCNHCO 



-r as x oi i— i o i— 1 r- * oi co co 
oi co i- o i o- o co o-i oi uo i/- 

Oli-HUOrt-OlOl-T'OJOlr-'CO 



i^ o i- r^ co x ~f x as co co 

1-H Ol lQ CO 01 r-lCHHHN 



X t~- Oi Oi OI CO I— Oi © 'X t~- 

H©'f«JXCOHin'tHt^ 
HH^Olr-rH^MH^C^l 



H-foiOcr-xift'MO'tic 
MkOto^iOcii-r^tLOcr. 



iC^iCiC^iOrfiduOiOiC 



rH UO rH CO 1 CO CD O- ~ CT- X 

Tfox'-oiCH/r-iCiooi' 



HHCOlNHHCNrHHHCl 



t^r^i-MOicsaiooiHco 

r-COiO~-r'iiO'-r<r r 01COCO 

OiXX'tiocNr^t^Tft^-^ 



^tOif^XClXXiflCC 



" 








a 


c 






O 

o 



* s? g r ~ 



«!<: 



Oo5oC3C5i-sCQDQ 











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■* 


N H f H^ f C) t Ol 


CO 
















Oi 








lO 


iO ^ CD O Oi X — CO 


CO 








00 


CN 00 t^ 'T iO H t- CO 




Ol t-H rHi-H r-H rH 






1-1 


lOiOOOOCNOlCN 


CM 






CNCNHHHHHOl 


Tjl 




rH 




00 


■OH-r-rc oi — co 




CO CO rH Ol Ol Ol rH CO 






CM 




CO 






^hh^t-HOICOOIt-HCO 


■* 




CM 




00 




to 


rr-^rHCMCOCNr-CO 






CM 




o> 


X"f I-- CO lO 01 01 X 




Tr^rH CN CO OlCN CO 






CM 




,_, 




OS 


COCOrHrHOlrHOlOl 






1-1 




,_, 






Ol rH rH 




HHOSt-MiClN^ 


CM 


ir5iOTj<iCiC' r :'^ 4 'JO 


lO 




lO 






(NXCNOlHiCtiO 




MCNHHCNHHCM 


CD 




rt 




o 


i>ccknxhoxoj 






00 




















CJ 




a 








n 




03 




p< 




CJ 




-o 


iiuaa 


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43 3 IS^ jf-g 

* — k2 5 c4 -S "-■ c4 





CO CO CO CO rH t- 'OQor-h- 

t- rH rH X CO -r 1 -r CO T 



oi^woowci'j'.'rf 

iO f* H CO iC CO CO "--. uO o 



t- Oa iC OOHTij^H iO 
o-rci or. ~ i - o i -/; -vie 

rH rH Ol rH 



Ht^HXCOOiMNHO 
l^ CD t rl 0) — — ~> CO iC 



co oi o- co i-O -r — oc, o iO 

co -p i-O X r. 01 cc cr ~ 01 



X X CO CD CD 01 01 "O X i-H 
CO I- l-~ 00 i0 1- 1^ Os CO iO 

co co oi oi rH t- &* cn -r 



X *C 1^ Ol CO CO Oi >-h X Ol 

CD i0 Oi — 01 — i-H 'CO 01 X 
CO"? CN CO CN O •*» CO iO 



t^> Ol Oi iO l^ i— iO O. i-0 CO 

CO iO O CO X 01 00 "0 CO ~ 
-? U0 rH Ol CO CO Ol «i CO CO 



Hi/t)i.Cj-tCOOHN'fOS 
O- i0 rH CO iH ^* >0 CO ,-h I-- 

: : ) I rH ,-H rt- CO CO Co CO CO 



CO CO CO -f »C CO i—t >H CD CO 
.-H Oi O- CO. OOI^HXOl 
CO T rH CO CO Ol f-- rH uC 



iCcOOirHCOXO~(013 
HrHiOCOiOOJiOCOl^CJ 



OXcOCCXiOO^C'lOi 



I^OOlH^riON/.i.C 

-r o Oi cd co -r* o ~-t co o> 

CD-^cOiOCOXOiCoOrH 
CN~CO rH~C^rHV^^ofTf 



rH -*" rH Oi Oi 01 -T f^ O CD 
h iO CI /. b h O- cr cd -r 
CO rH CN t- Ol CO CO ^ uO Ol 

co co" co x" i-T x" iO «i" o o" 

i— I rH r^ CO ''-H rH Ol 



?&■% 



^5 



c § -° 
>3 g Sofji 2 . 

Ifl OS © c4 s3 3 S "3 ! 



8490—00- 



-22 



338 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



V. 



2C 
I 

X 
X 



>SP.5 



— 0> a . 

a o 



<S 3 S 



:Nhh X' 



HH H Tp ©* ,-H 



XOSCNXOSi-iO-tXQOiOtO 

roost^cocoxcNXi-HOcor^ 

i-H i-H i-i CN ^ 9<* rH 



^t^NHi-iWriO^NOiX 
i— i-H i-i i-H CN »-< i-H 



©iOco<^^cNos*oo»^'>cf". 

t-h l-H rH CN fH T* >-< CN 



•^ i- ut o i- m ift i— 1 1- t© jc -r 
i*o:i^io:ci'.i':tci- -j: 

C4 rH i-I C4 C4 i-H CO rH CO Qq CO 






:■- ~ -r :■: cc — -r — ~ ~- -r © 
t i <z as -r -r r i ? 1 1 ^ x ~~ s © 

^lHHWXri'CMr-<«J © 



lOWrHCOWOJt^COTfNrHX 



COiCiC©©TT"l>XI^CCitD© 
H I> H CO O ^O f ^ iC ^ ^O CO H 
© i— ICNCOt'CNI^-C0©Q0'-hX 



£-r"-CNC0r^XI>-iCiOtoasCN 

OiCoit-t^cN-rtocoaiTi'co 

lOHHCNCOO-JNWXOiHX 



OS ii0 © iC i— iwOr iiCfr--.CN' 
iO Oi ■* X iO 'O "f l>- r- i <5* OS t 
CO r-( r- 1 CN i— (iCCNtCCi : 



Si " ? ! a. i - a. 1 1 7 1 1 - *■ f © x 
oi cn co as © to t^ as ic t* en 



'tCOtOOiCI'TfCNOlNCOH 
u^tOu^COiCiCiCiCTjH^jiOiC 



COOi— (tOtD-T-r^-OCO^tOX 
^^1-^TlOXHH^H^ 
©COT^t^r-rHCOCNQOOSCO 



CO H H Ol CN H ift M H >-1 



-*lDHCO 



XWOTfffOJiMI^iOiCiH 



T-. y. X -r lit Js i-*. CM id b- Tf t*- 

r* t-i i-H CNHiO^ CN 



So 



«( 



— j -— x • ^ c3 

„ c Q ,5 : ?^S ' 
; o a 3 a* o 3 os 



WATER SUPPLY. 



339 



Table XXXII. — Source of water supply. 



Department. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Police 

Port<> Rico 



Total num 

ber of 
dwellings. 



12, 583 
9, 776 
9, -174 
4,605 
3,253 
9,741 
5, 601 



Aque- 
duct. 



23 

24 

391 

1,011 

637 

2, 476 

4,831 



Spring. 



695 
1,394 
3, 455 
241 
990 
894 
227 



158,305 ' 55,093 



9,393 



i, 896 



River. 



4,456 
15, 252 
10, 403 
12, 955 
10, 520 

8,914 
22, 848 



85, 348 



Not 
stated. 



29 
58 
116 
56 
56 
146 
114 



575 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



District. 



Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 

Moca* 

Rincon 

San Sebastian 

The department 



Total num- 
ber of 
dwellings. 



17, 786 



Cistern. 



1,503 
1,970 
1,933 
2,828 
2, 052 
740 
1,557 



12, 583 



Aque- 
duct, 



Spring. 



23 



9 

113 

394 

92 

30 

1 

56 



695 



River. 



511 

1,004 
211 
801 
215 
385 

1, 329 



Not 
stated. 



4, 456 



29 



DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



Arecibo 

Barceloneta 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 

Utuado 

The department 



26, 504 



2, 887 

1,170 

830 

869 

1,053 

1,124 

510 

745 

588 



9,776 



233 
95 

315 
41 
80 

280 
4 

322 
24 



1,394 



2, 532 
256 
806 

1,941 
597 
995 

1,244 
167 

6, 714 



15, 252 



58 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



347 
055 
839 
697 
104 
251 
089 
196 
519 
324 
Till 
923 
076 
718 



1,192 
843 
798 
513 
932 
563 
472 
442 
373 
809 
412 
454 
809 
862 



23, 839 



9,474 



3 
...... 

12 
370 



643 
60 



123 
27 



53 

177 

1,600 

4 

249 

52 

77 

390 



3,455 



1,478 

1,145 

1,039 

60 

1,139 

688 

1,558 

1,543 

151 

504 

36 

415 

190 

457 



10, 403 



340 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXXII. — Source of water supply — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Caye>' 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncoa 

Salinas , 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



Total num- 
ber of 
dwellings. 



1,306 
783 
3, 406 
2,359 
1,326 
1,336 
2, 290 
1,405 
1,417 
995 
2, 305 



18, 928 



Cistern. 



637 
339 
428 
383 
2 
660 
270 
502 
498 
440 
506 



4, 665 



Aque- 
duct. 



1,010 



1,011 



Spring. 



169 

12 



River. 



655 

■137 

2, 803 

1,957 

1,316 

673 

967 

901 

916 

537 

1,793 



12, 955 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



Fajardo . . 
Humacao 
Maunabo 
Naguabo . 
Patillas . . 
Piedras .. 
Vieques . . 
Yabucoa . 



The department 



3,012 
2,307 
1,157 

1,875 
2, 058 
1,488 
1,273 
2,286 



15, 456 



340 
552 
9 
650 
259 
317 
834 
292 



3, 253 



303 
332 



637 



115 

239 
29 

167 
2 
1 

430 
7 



2, 542 
1,509 
1,115 
750 
1,455 
1,166 
8 
1,975 



10, 520 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Afiasco 

CaboRojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez . . 

Sabana Grande \ 

San German 

The department 



22, 171 



1,366 
2,338 

336 
1,075 

462 

432 

1,361 

1 

531 
1,840 



9,741 



29 

41 

2, 404 

1,998 



2, 476 



237 

256 

32 

59 

6 

14 

83 

16 

71 

136 



894 



802 

272 

221 

333 

1,569 

1,079 

1,798 

9 

1,252 

1,588 



8,914 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

JuanaDiaz 

Pefiuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yaueo 

The department 



3,416 
1,328 
1,261 
2, 292 
2, 362 
1,622 
4,399 
2, 044 
9,413 
1,629 
807 
4,677 



33, 621 



603 
139 
254 
325 
51 
259 
636 
578 
859 
180 
398 
1,499 



5, 601 



57 



9 

267 



4,436 

U,286 



61 



4,831 



3 

7 

20 

2 

70 

27 

10 

113 



2,743 
1,186 
1,004 
1,963 
2,304 
1,342 
3,466 
1,460 
3, 985 
93 
399 
2,996 



DISPOSAL OF GARBAGE. 



841 



Table XXXIII. — Disposal of garbagt 



Department. 


Total num- 
ber of 

dwellings. 


City. 


Private. 


Burn. 


Not 
stated. 




17, 786 
26, 504 
23, 839 
18, 928 
15, 456 
22, 171 
33, 621 


1,676 
2,491 
3,213 
3,748 
2,373 
2,189 
4,504 


15, 050 
23, 087 
16,311 
12, 747 
8, 537 
17, 746 
18, 869 


1,029 
859 
3,675 
2,367 
4,458 
2,132 
10,117 


31 




67 




640 




66 




88 




104 




131 








158, 305 


20, 194 


112, 347 


24, 637 


1 127 







DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



District. 



Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 

Moca 

Rincon 

San Sebastian 

The department 



Total num- 
ber of 
dwellings. 



2,025 
3,097 
2,542 
3,747 
2, 298 
1,127 
2, 950 



17, 786 



City. 



792 
168 
185 
215 



316 



Private. 



1,533 
2,269 
2, 233 
3, 400 
1,980 
1,021 
2,614 



1,676 



15, 050 



Burn. 



491 
31 
136 
153 
100 
106 
12 



1,029 



Not 

stated. 



DKPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



Arecibo 

Bareeloneta 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 

Utuado 

The department 



5, 667 
1,524 
1,953 
2,856 
1,740 
2,424 
1,765 
1,236 
7, 339 



26, 504 



867 



78 

198 

1 
785 



152 

410 



4,471 
1,411 
1,828 
2, 546 
1, 720 
1,399 
1, 755 
1,080 
6,877 



2, 491 



23,087 



314 
111 
44 
107 

7 

233 

4 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

TrujilloAlto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



3,347 

2,055 

1,839 

697 

2, 104 

1,251 

2,089 

2,196 

2, 519 

1,324 

701 

923 

1,076 

1,718 



23, 839 



411 
401 



232 

185 

1,452 

187 



19 
326' 



2, 668 

1,578 

1,511 

546 

1,470 

1,207 

1,397 

1,724 

471 

538 

341 

710 

886 

1,264 



3, 213 



16,311 



246 
66 
261 
151 
370 
44 
388 
275 
590 
597 
356 
23 
190 
118 



3,675 



12 
6 
2 
4 
171 



10 
640 



342 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXXIII. — Disposal of garbage — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



District. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



Total num- 
ber of 
dwellings. 



1,306 
783 
3,406 
2,359 
1,326 
1,336 
2,290 
1,405 
1,417 
995 
2,305 



IS, 928 



City. 



207 



895 

468 
219 
201 
801 
233 
377 
142 
205 



3,748 



Private. 



1,092 

481 

2, 297 

1,196 

1,098 

1,078 

1,037 

1,168 

675 

540 

2, 085 



12, 747 



Burn. 



3 

298 

208 

689 

1 

44 

439 

2 

363 

310 

10 



2,367 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabucoa 

The department 



3,012 
2,307 
1,157 
1,875 
2, 058 
1,488 
1,273 
2, 286 



15, 456 



681 
463 
200 
296 
340 



262 
131 



2,373 



1,497 

1,663 

454 

370 

1,028 

1,041 

631 

1,853 



8,537 



819 
176 
499 
1,175 
676 
443 
379 
291 



3,458 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Anasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Maricao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez. . 

Sabana Grande 

San German 

The department 



2,411 
2,886 
594 
1,473 
2, 070 
1,570 
5,736 
2,107 
1,861 
3,570 



22, 171 



350 
21 



30 

102 

1,375 

1,37/t 



311 



1,629 
2, 235 
582 
1,280 
1,806 
1,451 
3,947 

en 

1,854 
2,962 



17,746 



427 
610 

7 
186 
231 

8 
369 
106 

1 
293 



2, 132 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Pefiuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



3,416 
1,328 
1,261 
2, 292 
2,362 
1,622 
4,399 
2,044 
9,413 
U,629 
807 
4,677 



33, 621 



15 

415 



311 
3,127" 



42S 



4,504 



2. 838 
607 

1,078 
2,074 
1,014 
1,247 

2. 839 
914 

2, 660 
29L 
234 

3,364 



18,869 



357 

718 

177 

200 

929 

370 

1,238 

1,124 

3, 559 

1,170 

573 

872 



10,117 



DISPOSAL OF EXCRETA. 



343 



Table XXXIV. — Disposal of excreta. 



Department. 



Aguadilla 

Arecibo 

Bayamon 

Guayama 

Humacao 

Mayaguez 

Ponce 

Porto Rico 



Total num- 
ber of 
dwellings. 



17,786 
26, 504 
23, 839 
18, 928 
15,456 
22, 171 
33,621 



158, 305 



Cesspool. 



3,042 
4,488 
6,581 
4,408 
2,547 
5,209 
8,554 



34,829 



27 

39 

328 

24 

17 

240 

506 



1,181 



14, 682 
21,914 
16, 383 
14,441 
12, 521 
16, 649 
24,334 



120, 924 



Not 
stated. 



35 
63 

547 
55 

371 
73 

227 



1,371 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



District. 


Total num- 
ber of 
dwellings. 


Cesspool. 


Sewer. 


None. 


Not 
stated. 




2,025 
3,097 
2,542 
3,747 
2, 298 
1,127 
2,950 


210 
743 
185 
907 
338 
78 

58r 


4 

5 

1 

14 


1 
1,806 
2,341 
2, 351 
2,818 
1,959 
1,047 
2,360 


5 




8 




5 




8 




I 




2 

1 






8 








17, 786 


3, 042 


27 


14,682 ' 


35 







DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



Arecibo 

Barceloneta 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 

Utuado 

The department 



5,667 
1,524 
1,953 
2,856 
1,740 
2,424 
1,765 
1,236 
7,339 



26,501 



994 
222 
295 
507 
207 
713 
238 
167 
1,145 



3,488 



4,642 
1,299 
1,654 
2,337 
1,523 
1,706 
1,520 
1,066 
6,167 



21,914 



63 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjita 

Rio Grande 

Rio Piedras 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 

Vega Alta 

Vega Baja 

The department 



3,347 

2, 055 

1,831 

697 

2,104 

1,251 

2, 089 

2, 196 

2,519 

1,324 

701 

923 

1,076 

1,718 



23, 839 



1,033 
517 
237 
267 
352 
119 
557 
489 

1,778 
215 
380 
102 
184 
351 



6, 581 



13 

4 

281 



:;2S 



2, 282 

1,298 

1,597 

419 

1,555 

1,132 

1,514 

1,668 

448 

1,107 

309 

808 

891 

1,355 



16, 383 



21 
237 

5 



547 



844 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OP PORTO RTCO, 1899. 



Table XXXIV. — Disposal of excreta — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



District. 



Aguas Buenas 

Arroyo 

Caguas 

Cayey 

Cidra" 

Comerio 

Guayama 

Gurabo 

Juncos 

Salinas 

San Lorenzo 

The department 



Total num- 
ber of 
dwellings. 



1,306 
783 
3,406 
2, 359 
1,326 
1,336 
2, 290 
1,405 
1,417 
995 
2, 305 



18, 928 



Cesspool. 



176 
303 
1,054 
524 
295 
238 
867 
123 
230 
417 
181 



4,408 



Sewer. 



1, 121 
474 
2,341 
1,825 
1,023 
1,096 
1,405 
1,280 
1,184 
573 
2,119 



14, 441 



Not 
stated. 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



Fajardo 

Humacao 

Maunabo 

Naguabo 

Patillas 

Piedras 

Vieques 

Yabueoa 

The department 



3, 012 
2,307 
1,157 

1,875 
2,058 
1,488 
1,273 
2,286 



15, 456 



646 

504 

80 

398 
422 
132 

285 



2,547 



2, 349 

1,795 
1,071 
1,155 
1,620 
1,350 
985 
2,196 



12, 521 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



Anasco 

Cabo Rojo 

Hormigueros 

Lajas 

Las Marias 

Marieao 

Mayaguez 

City of Mayaguez. . 

Sabana Grande 

San German 

The department 



2,411 
2,886 
594 
1,473 
2,070 
1,570 
5,736 
2,107 
1,861 
3, 570 



22, 171 



538 

462 

73 

324 

238 

275 

2, 370 

1,591 

230 

699 



5,209 



10 
33 
148 
131 
1 
43 



1,865 
2,403 

515 
1,143 
1, 819 
1,256 
3,197 

370 
1,625 
2,826 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juan Diaz 

Penuelas 

Ponee 

City of Ponee 

Santa Isabel 

Yauco 

The department 



3, 416 
1,328 
1,261 
2,292 
2, 362 
1,622 
4,399 
2,044 
9,413 
h,&29 
807 
4,677 



33, 621 



623 

238 

51 

130 

421 

111 

419 

231 

4,836 

3,6/tl 

151 

1,343 



8,554 



241 
4 



3 

4 

4 

220 

211 

1 

26 



506 



2,486 
1,083 
1,206 
2,152 
1,937 
1,503 
3,965 
1,803 
4,246 
731 
655 
3,298 



24, 334 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



345 







55tfcfiHE 



346 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



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•c — : T - - " 93 • : - 

-;:••;; :-- x " — 

;-_ — -:—:-:- — 


93 

X 


33 C ."- — t« 93 C 3[ ; — — Z. 
:-.— '— ~ V — ~ ~ z ~ — 


93 

— 


C- ^ r — — 33 :' " - T 

-— Z Z- — c — c — - 
:-. r 1 : ■ — — : 103 


r- 


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- - '— . X JriSSr-I ."-" 


93 
- 
30 

: ' 


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— : : z . - - : --.-z z- 
:-. -.-. — r- — 


93 

- 


31X :-- * :-- X -..Z-Z. 

- - - -. — ::z. - z. X :- 

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| 


93 SOHOSOICJO) 3 

— '—.'.' z - - -■ 


- 

99 





'. x .' = : : — 3 x d 






348 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXXVI. — Marriages in Porto Rico, 1888 to 1S'.)8, inclusive, by departments and 

municipal districts. 



Departments and muni- 
cipal districts. 


1SSS. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


Total. 




485 


450 


595 


648 


626 


572 


556 


673 


657 


532 


390 


6, 184 








53 
25 
44 

146 
84 
28 

105 


52 
39 
49 
121 

81 
21 

87 


72 
63 
94 

143 
72 
46 

105 


98 
67 
55 

154 
90 
56 

128 


72 
100 

71 
143 
105 

24 
111 


75 
109 

59 
128 

53 

34 
114 


63 
93 
57 

149 
55 
22 

117 


81 

146 
73 
143 
116 

37 

77 


55 
135 

72 
164 

89 

35 
107 


45 

75 
77 
103 
64 
76 
92 


45 
87 
44 
60 
65 
29 
60 


711 




939 


Isabela 

Moca 

Rincon 

San Sebastian 


695 

1,'454 

874 

408 

1,103 


Areeibo 


845 


484 


855 


624 


666 


841 


734 


956 


822 


857 


487 


8,171 




33 


86 


113 


110 


125 


95 


109 


110 


135 


187 


140 


1,243 








108 
210 
65 
57 
16 
64 
292 


84 
35 
59 
13 
1 
54 
152 


45 
108 
71 
47 
67 
64 
340 


49 
76 
33 
32 
53 
69 
202 


63 
62 
32 
56 
51 
52 
225 


76 
67 
48 

193 
42 
53 

267 


45 
79 
40 

102 
66 
42 

251 


58 
94 
52 

113 
78 
55 

396 


73 
87 
38 

142 
61 
40 

246 


50 
85 
51 

130 
45 
97 

212 


29 
29 
21 
93 
37 
29 
109 


680 




932 


Hatillo 


510 




978 




517 


Quebradillas 


619 
2,692 








304 


375 


577 


469 


550 


601 


475 


587 


549 


445 


428 


5, 360 








29 

6 
69 

8 


19 

57 
55 
5 


95 
29 
90 
10 
10 
49 
19 
113 
36 
19 
14 
33 
60 


69 
35 
63 

9 
19 
46 
21 
104 
19 

7 
11 
16 
50 


86 
47 
74 

7 

18 
37 
40 
139 
25 

8 
14 
14 
41 


102 
41 
81 
16 
17 
47 
29 

148 
35 
3 
21 
17 
44 


72 
35 
60 
7 
14 
25 
29 
102 
38 
13 
13 
30 
37 


99 

52 

102 

8 

11 

49 

27 

124 

30 

13 

19 

20 

33 


85 
37 
82 
10 
17 
34 
29 
134 
32 
8 

26 
17 
38 


65 

44 
47 

1 

18 
21 
32 
111 
25 

5 

20 
30 
26 


77 
21 
43 
15 
53 
28 
27 
86 
10 
6 
18 
10 
34 


798 




404 




766 




96 




177 




36 
34 
51 
17 
2 
8 

37 


48 

47 

54 

29 

8 

7 

5 

41 


420 




334 




1,166 


Toa Alta 


296 


Toa Baja 

TrujilloAlto 


92 
171 
199 


Vega Baja 


441 




327 


205 


383 


358 


425 


496 


404 


380 


427 


393 


315 


4,123 






Aguas Buenas 


29 
9 
31 
57 
12 
36 
29 
11 
18 
21 
74 


31 
4 
15 

44 
35 
19 
5 
5 
4 
3 
40 


39 
7 

64 
47 
53 
34 
30 
20 
16 
14 
59 


31 
24 
69 
37 
36 
31 
27 
18 
24 
9 
52 


98 
16 
81 
35 
37 
18 
33 
20 
23 
7 
67 


76 
20 
75 
36 
44 
37 
34 
43 
35 
15 
81 


42 
14 
70 
40 
38 
26 
51 
26 
26 
18 
53 


43 

12 
77 
36 
37 
23 
33 
33 
27 
10 
49 


41 
15 
66 
39 
42 
34 
31 
86 
19 
16 
38 


26 
7 
83 
43 
38 
41 
21 
51 
22 
22 
39 


15 
11 
54 
34 
39 
27 
22 
32 
26 
9 
46 


471 
139 




685 




448 




411 




326 


Guayama 


316 
345 




240 




144 


San Lorenzo 


598 




151 


126 


252 


224 


277 


367 


285 


283 


229 


241 


294 


2, 729 








27 
16 
12 
29 

SO 
2 
6 

22 


24 

38 

21 

27 

3 

8 

2 

3 


63 

35 
28 
49 
16 
37 
13 
11 


49 
48 
17 
35 
22 
34 
12 
7 


47 
44 
25 
58 
24 
27 
34 
18 


72 
39 
32 
68 
53 
38 
45 
20 


49 
34 
20 
43 
40 
39 
45 
15 


63 
42 
19 
36 

28 
44 
32 
19 


49 
23 
17 
47 
21 
30 
29 
13 


47 
33 
14 
38 
32 
33 
30 
14 


131 
23 
11 
36 
19 
39 
27 
8 


621 




375 




216 




466 




265 




359 


Rio Grande 2 


271 
134 




22 
























Mayaguez 


278 


232 


586 


743 


691 


621 


864 


711 


528 


477 


362 


6,093 


Afiasco 

Cabo Rojo 


28 
37 


19 

1 


57 
74 
13 
49 
53 
29 

139 
65 

107 


64 

84 

16 

43 

59 

30 

173 

129 

145 


93 

80 
22 
54 
60 
30 

181 
63 

108 


72 
90 
12 
39 
58 
27 
161 
64 
98 


70 

89 
15 
52 
68 
58 

140 
56 

316 


104 

96 
9 
37 
80 
26 

145 
49 

165 


80 
47 
17 
37 
62 
16 
128 
52 
89 


64 

67 
18 
25 
56 
16 
116 
39 
76 


41 
56 
18 
18 
32 
20 
89 
37 
51 


692 
721 
140 




6 
45 
12 

77 
29 
44 


4 

35 
10 
08 
63 
32 


364 




608 




274 




1,417 


Sabana Grande 

San German 


646 
1,231 



1 Included with district of Manati. 

- Included in department of Hutnacao for reasons explained on page 41. 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



349 



Table XXXVI. — Marriages in Porto Rico, 1888 to 1898, inclusive, by departments and 

municipal districts — Continued. 



Departments and muni- 
cipal districts. 



Ponce 899 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla... 
Juana Diaz... 

Penuelas 

Ponce 

Santa Isabel.. 
Yauco 



139 
41 
47 

113 
99 
56 
76 
13 

149 
32 

134 



31 
22 
76 
9 
31 
26 
40 
131 
15 
80 



1890. 



831 



106 
60 
55 
64 
66 
48 
75 
46 

175 
21 

115 



1891. j 1892. 



171 
38 
53 

102 
61 
31 
53 
30 

199 

9 

81 



113 
27 
55 

104 
43 
46 
63 
46 

156 
14 



1893. 



100 
37 
63 
77 

.58 
43 
65 
51 

189 
15 

101 



1894. 



616 



28 
34 
67 
47 
20 
35 
41 
149 
21 



73 
43 
48 
75 
50 
21 
91 
26 
156 
12 



1896. 



54 
72 
31 
12 
32 
14 
141 
24 
70 



78 
33 

127 
44 
29 
21 
79 
91 

156 
29 
97 



1898. Total. 



45 
50 
43 
14 

52 

11 

118 

12 

48 



7, 725 



1 , 054 
390 
603 
844 
536 
343 
647 
409 

1,719 
204 
976 



350 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OK PORTO RICO, 1899. 



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352 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Tablk XXXVIII. — Farm areas in cuerdas, 

PORTO RICO. 



Department'. 



Porto Rico 

Aguadilla 
Arecibo . . 
Bayamon. 
Guayama. 
Humacao 
Mayaguez 
Police 



Number of 
farms. 



39, 021 



6, 206 
6, 764 
5, 586 
3,975 
3, 273 
6, 218 
6,939 



Total area. 



1 , 757, 774 



176, 751 
337, 735 
253,247 
225, 182 
174, 824 
223, 942 
366, 093 



Culti- 
vated. 



477, 987 



55, 808 
101,030 
43, 785 
49, 653 
31,302 
78, 989 
117,420 



Large 
timber. 



141,803 



8, 656 
38, 869 
16,073 
17, 070 
15, 735 
20, 796 
24, 604 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



Aguada 

Aguadilla 

Isabela 

Lares 

Moca 

Rincon 

San Sebastian 

Total . . . 



Number of 
farms. 



970 
820 
898 
931 
968 
569 
1,110 



Total area. 



6,266 



17,442 
19,711 
29, 492 
35, 718 
24,193 
7, 855 
42, 340 



176,751 



Culti- 
vated. 



4,844 
5, 666 
7,212 

17, 124 
5, 104 
2,771 

13, 087 



55, 808 



Large 
timber. 



704 
1,177 
1,823 
1,893 
1,028 

108 
1,923 



8, 656 



DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



Arecibo 

Bareeloneta . 

Camuy 

Ciales 

Hatillo 

Manati 

Morovis 

Quebradillas 
Utuado 

Total . . 



1,448 
364 
532 
715 
577 
455 
537 
435 

1,701 



6,764 



69, 965 
19, 260 
23, 724 
40, 835 
23, 951 
20, 954 
24, 250 
12, 330 
102, 466 



337, 735 



15, 064 
4,711 
4,266 

17, 153 
4,115 
4,131 
6, 026 
2, 665 

42, 899 



101,030 



11,118 
2,799 
1,223 
4,050 
1,708 
2,758 
972 
850 
13, 391 



38, 869 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



Bayamon 

Carolina 

Corozal 

Dorado 

Loiza 

Naranjito . . . 
Rio Grande.. 
Rio Piedras.. 

San Juan 

Toa Alta 

Toa Baja 

Trujillo Alto 
Vega Alta . . . 
Vega Baja... 

Total . . 



727 
447 
771 
123 
466 
395 
465 
575 
55 
353 
128 
311 
307 
463 



32, 682 

17,994 
24, 466 
12, 449 
27, 892 
16, 497 
31,453 
23, 401 

1,445 
11,130 

8,061 
10, 566 
12, 869 
22, 342 



253, 247 



5, 122 

3, 815 
4,929 

965 
6,280 
4,398 
4,911 
2, 783 

174 
1,324 
1,029 
1,330 
2, 754 
3,971 



43, 785 



1,658 

525 

443 

1,250 

1,700 

286 

5, 294 

642 

21 

334 

783 

115 

1,449 

1,573 



16,073 



STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE. 



353 



Table XXXVIII — Farm areas in cuerdas — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



District. 


Number of 
farms. 


Total area. 


Culti- 
vated. 


Large 
timber. 


Small 
timber. 




415 
99 
567 
561 
419 
323 
277 
279 
322 
99 
614 


18, 640 
6,141 
34.241 

28, 585 
19, 300 
18, 154 
22, 159 
15, 591 
14, 000 
20, 757 
27, 614 


5,180 
2, 108 
5,117 
10, 758 
4,387 
5,799 
5, 442 
2,262 
2,963 
1,896 
3,741 


960 


567 








1,167 

1,680 

568 

1,002 

6,235 

334 

399 

2,776 

1,949 


2,639 




4,055 
881 




85 




4,151 




666 




269 




1,616 




816 






Total 


3, 975 


225, 182 


49, 653 


17, 070 


15, 745 







DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 





54 
397 
485 
273 
316 
481 
552 
120 
595 


2,677 
32, 224 
19, 373 
11,765 
16, 783 
22, 713 
16, 235 
25, 813 
27, 241 


263 
6,548 
3,135 
2, 972 
2, 273 
4, 924 
1,780 
4,003 
5,404 


863 
3,010 

216 

856 
3,426 
2,413 

658 
3,307 

986 






1,558 




602 




278 




1,786 




135 




441 




2, 361 




161 






Total 


3,273 


174, 824 


31,302 


15, 735 


7,322 









723 
935 
166 
513 
647 
265 

1,128 
542 

1,299 


20, 871 
36, 806 
5,986 
30, 072 
30, 334 
22,648 
30, 782 
17, 894 
28, 549 


8,092 
6,630 
1,775 
5,409 
17, 451 
13, 109 
13, 430 
4,233 
8,860 


644 
6, 153 

265 
2, 987 
2,590 
3.629 
1,467 
1,380 
1,681 


1,906 




3,895 




41 




1,816 




5,341 




1,880 




1,620 




562 




1,102 






Total 


6,218 


223, 942 


78, 989 


20, 796 


18,163 







DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



Adjuntas 

Aibonito 

Barranquitas ... 

Barros 

Coamo 

Guayanilla 

Juana Diaz 

Peiiuelas 

Ponce 

City of Ponce 

Santa Isabel 

Yaueo 

Total 



8490—00- 



-23 



734 

302 

560 

795 

599 

546 

764 

701 

749 

5 

72 

1,117 



6,939 



42, 399 
14, 272 
21,515 
40, 909 
35, 873 
22, 146 
43, 373 
24, 578 
51, 402 
2,010 
14,593 
55, 033 



366, 093 



23, 306 
4,174 
5, 273 

12, 836 
7,040 
6,697 

14, 877 
6,264 

19,517 

638 

2, 208 

15, 228 



117,420 



4, 585 



792 
5, 106 
1,680 
2, 275 
2, 313 
2.191 
3, 585 



24 
2, 053 



24, 604 



7,009 



1,220 
5,310 
1,079 
2,042 
3, 845 
1,889 
2,483 



1,716 
7,133 



33, 726 



354 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XXXIX. — Tenure of farms, by size and by race of occupant. 
PORTO RICO. 





Number 

of 
farms. 


0to4 
euerdas. 


5 to 9 
euerdas. 


10 to 19 
euerdas. 


20 to 49 
euerdas. 


50 to 99 
euerdas. 


100 euer- 
das and 
over. 




27, 617 

1,841 

8,555 

569 

439 


14, 675 

885 

6,113 

400 

254 


5,452 
377 

1,410 
103 

75 


3,527 

247 

650 

38 

41 


2,380 

190 

295 

22 

42 


833 
77 
68 
5 
11 


750 




65 




19 




1 


Other 


16 






Total 


39, 021 


22, 327 


7,417 


4,503 


2,929 


994 


851 







DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



DEPARTMENT OF AREOIBO. 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 





5,325 

413 

466 

32 

30 


3,248 

219 

317 

18 

13 


1,003 
97 

77 
5 
9 


561 
53 
42 
5 
6 


335 

34 

20 

3 

1 


116 
10 
8 
1 


62 








■> 






Other. . 


1 








Total 


6,266 


3, 815 


1,191 


667 


393 


135 


65 









5,579 

137 

989 

13 

46 


2,521 
57 
612 

5 
27 


1,183 

30 
182 

4 
5 


849 

21 

118 

3 

7 


629 

16 

57 

1 

3 


228 
10 
13 


169 




3 




7 






Other 


2 


2 






Total 


6,764 


3,222 


1,404 


998 


706 


253 


181 



White owners 

White renters 

Colored owners 


3,193 
270 

1,807 
199 
117 


1,907 
141 

1,422 
154 

85 


651 
53 

254 
32 
19 


381 
34 
99 
8 
6 


175 

21 

28 

5 

6 


40 
4 
3 


39 
17 

1 


Other 




1 








Total 


5,586 


3,709 


1,009 


528 


235 


47 


58 









2,307 
405 

1,096 
117 
50 


1,063 

174 

701 

71 

25 


518 
70 

224 
29 
9 


364 
69 
95 
8 
2 


232 

59 

59 

7 

9 


82 
19 
16 
2 
2 


48 




14 




1 






Other 


3 






Total 


3,975 


2,034 


850 


538 


366 


121 


66 









1,701 
143 

1,302 
86 
41 


1,236 
91 

1,064 
71 
22 


250 
16 

165 
10 

12 


103 

13 

59 

3 

2 


47 
3 

12 
2 
4 


21 
8 
2 


44 




12 






Colored renters 




Other 


1 








Total 


3,273 


2,484 


453 


180 


68 


32 


56 







STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE. 



355 



Table XXXIX. — Tenure of farms, by size and by race of occupant — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OP MAYAGUEZ. 





Number 
of 

farms. 


0to4 

cuerdas. 


5 to 9 
cuerdas. 


10 to 19 

cuerdas. 


20 to 49 
cuerdas. 


50 to 99 
cuerdas. 


100 cuer- 
das and 
over. 




4,541 

283 

1,238 

65 

91 


2,489 

137 

906 

44 

53 


805 
67 

197 
13 
12 


509 

33 

76 

6 

10 


406 
33 
43 


159 

11 

12 

1 

3 


173 




2 




4 




1 


Other 


8 


5 






Total 


0,218 


3, 629 


1,094 


634 


490 


186 


185 







DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 





4,971 
190 

1,657 
57 
64 


2,211 
66 

1,091 
37 
29 


1,042 
44 

311 
10 
9 


760 
24 

161 
5 
8 


556 
24 
76 
4 
11 


187 

15 

14 

1 

3 


215 




17 




4 






Other 


4 






Total 


6,939 


3,434 


1,416 


958 


671 


220 


240 







Table XL. — Tenure of farms, by size and by race of occupant, and cultivated area. 

PORTO RICO. 





Number 
of farms. 


0to4 
cuerdas. 


5 to 9 
cuerdas. 


10 to 19 
cuerdas. 


20 to 49 
cuerdas. 


50 to 99 
cuerdas. 


100 

cuerdas 

and over. 




27, 617 

1,841 

8,555 

569 

439 


33, 651 
2,166 

12,931 
920 
606 


36, 066 

2,511 

9,126 

682 

490 


46, 099 

3,276 

8,346 

507 

532 


68, 489 

5,366 

8.114 

625 

1,189 


54,541 

5, 010 

4,307 

319 

765 


150, 988 
13, 584 
2,960 








100 


Other 


3,760 






Total 


39, 021 


50, 274 


48, 875 


58, 760 


83, 783 


64, 942 


171, 392 



DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 





5, 325 

413 

466 

32 

30 


7,232 
568 
667 
39 

27 


6,562 

634 

507 

29 

59 


7,233 
680 
554 

72 
76 


9,562 

951 

580 

96 

40 


7, 549 
623 
554 

75 


10,214 






483 






Other 


140 








Total 


6,266 


8, 533 


7,791 


8, 615 


11,229 


8,801 


10,837 







DEPARTMENT OF AKKCllio. 





5,579 

137 

989 

13 

46 


5,995 

155 

1,377 

15 

65 


7,828 

215 

1,198 

26 

28 


11,149 

288 

1,528 

36 

92 


18,502 

444 

1,583 

26 

82 


15, 077 
578 
916 


31, 134 




748 


Colored owners 


1,007 


Other 


178 


762 






Total 


6,764 


7,607 


9, 295 


13, 093 


20, 637 


16, 749 


33, 651 





DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 





3,193 

270 

1,807 

199 

117 


4,434 
332 

3,069 
332 

197 


4,363 
339 

1,611 
207 
120 


4,995 
466 

1 , 265 
121 

82 


4,822 
594 
804 
160 
160 


2, 643 
280 
180 


8, 81S 
3 166 






120 






Other 




100 








Total 


5,586 


8,364 


6,640 


6,929 


6,540 


3,103 


12, 204 







350 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Table XL. — Tenure of fannx, by size and by race of occupant, etc. — Continued. 
department of guayama. 



White owners . . 
White renters . . 
Colored owners. 
Colored renters. 
Other 



Total 



Number 
of farms. 



2, 307 
405 

1,096 
117 

50 



3, 975 



0to4 

cuerdas. 



2,521 
421 

1,536 
173 
66 



4,717 



5 to 9 

cuerdas. 



3,469 
489 

1,469 
196 
62 



5, 685 



10 to 19 
cuerdas. 



20 to 49 
cuerdas. 



4,904 
913 

1,242 
99 
29 



7,187 



6,710 

1,734 

1,645 

179 

284 



10,552 



50 to 99 
cuerdas. 



5, 359 

1,272 

1,023 

144 

123 



100 
cuerdas 
and over. 



7, 921 



9, 365 

3,101 

130 



1,017 



13,613 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



White owners . . 
White renters . . 
Colored owners. 
Colored renters. 
Other 



Total 



1,701 
143 

1,302 
86 
41 



3, 273 



2, 574 
215 

2,068 
157 

47 



6, 061 



1,609 

104 

1,049 

69 



1,276 
168 
716 
42 
25 



2, 227 



1,350 
66 

343 
65 

123 



1,947 



1,436 
574 
142 



60 



2,212 



13, 744 
3,217 



16, 961 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



White owners . . 
White renters . . 
Colored owners. 
Colored renters. 
Other 



Total 



4,541 
2S3 

1,238 
65 
91 



6, 218 



5,558 
299 

1,859 
103 
128 



7,947 



5,295 
439 

1,273 
83 
80 



7,170 



6, 668 

436 

960 

78 

132 



8, 274 



11,660 

879 

1,145 



223 



13, 907 



10, 472 

658 

681 

50 

214 



12, 075 



28, 061 
211 
500 
100 
757 



29, 629 



White owners . . 
White renters . . 
Colored owners. 
Colored renters. 
Other 



Total 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



4,971 
190 

1,657 
57 
64 



6,939 



5, 337 
176 

2, 355 
101 

76 



8, 045 



6, 940 

291 

2, 019 

72 

61 



9,383 



9,874 
325 

2,081 
59 
96 



12,435 



15, 883 

698 

2,014 

99 

277 



18,971 



12, 005 

1,025 

811 

50 

190 



14, 081 



49, 652 

3,141 

720 



984 



54, 497 



Table XLI. — Areas cultivated in the principal crops, in cuerdas. 
PORTO RICO. 





Tobac- 
co. 


Sugar 
cane. 


Rice. 


Sweet 
pota- 
toes. 


Malan- 
gas. 


Yams. 


Bana- 
nas. 


Cocoa- 
nuts. 


Coffee. 


Indian 
corn. 


White owners 

White renters 

Colored owners 

Colored renters 

Other 


4,361 

1,005 

451 

56 

90 


53, 758 

14,824 

939 

341 

2,284 


6,466 
541 

1,442 
109 
109 


26, 574 

2, 509 

7,004 

650 

372 


9,057 
682 

2, 271 
136 
110 


1,528 
126 
395 

28 
21 


57, 837 

2,482 

7, 840 

404 

817 


4,219 
387 
620 
80 
141 


173, 505 

5, 797 

14, 525 

679 

2, 525 


13, 914 
1,274 

2,598 
161 
146 


Total 


5, 963 


72, 146 


8,667 


37, 109 


12,256 2 098 


69, 380 


5, 447 


197,031 


18, 093 






. 





DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



Colored owners 


333 
12 
1 


2, 751 

347 

285 

10 

61 


501 
49 
26 

2 


5,811 

674 

383 

48 

45 


945 
199 

70 

27 

1 


303 
50 
29 

8 
2 


6,409 

492 

399 

42 

39 


952 
30 

(Hi 
5 
1 


21,560 

953 

1,499 

76 

129 


1,825 
207 
132 
30 


Other 


5 
351 


16 






Total 


3, 454 


578 


6, 961 


1,242 


392 


7,381 


1,054 


24,217 


2, 210 





STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE. 



357 



Table XLI. — Areas cultivated in the principal crops, in cuerdas — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 





To- 
bacco. 


Sugar 
cane. 


Rice. 


Sweet 
pota- 
toes. 


Malan- 

gas. 


Yams. 


Bana- 
nas. 


Cocoa- 
nuts. 


Coffee. 


Indian 
(Mini. 


White owners 

White renters 

Colored owners 

Colored renters 

Other 


809 

37 

35 

1 

2 


3,668 

1,064 

114 

16 

762 


565 

7 

53 


7,242 
223 

1.039 
29 
56 


1,784 

23 

236 

1 
8 


517 
6 

73 

4 


19, 706 

299 

1,799 

16 

99 


534 

4 

33 

1 


46, 260 

547 

3,303 

25 

222 


2, 780 

94 

275 

8 

22 






Total 


884 


5, 624 


625 


8,589 


2,052 


600 


21,919 


572 


50, 357 


3 179 







DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



White owners 

White renters 

Colored owners 

Colored renters 

Other 


103 

12 

18 

1 

1 


7,647 

3,477 

256 

151 

82 


1,296 

92 

448 

37 

30 


4,234 
428 

2, 040 
272 
110 


671 
35 

260 
13 
24 


145 
39 

119 
6 
10 


3,090 
296 

755 
75 
100 


1,156 

47 
427 

71 
100 


7,164 
360 

1,074 
45 
110 


998 
88 

302 
35 

25 






Total 


135 


11,613 


1,903 


7,084 


1,003 


319 


4,316 


1,801 


8,753 


1,448 







DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



White owners 

White renters 

Colored owners 

Colored renters 

Other 


1,480 
441 

187 
39 
58 


4,565 

3,066 

46 

1 

632 


853 

150 

244 

32 

20 


3,654 
763 

1,403 
155 
53 


1,704 

249 

612 

34 

27 


48 
10 
24 
11 
2 


2,952 
403 

1,090 

123 

34 


62 

61 

20 

1 


12,212 

1,905 

2, 126 

250 

422 


848 

131 

281 

37 

27 






Total 


2, 205 


8,310 


1,299 


6,028 


2, &>6 


95 


4,602 


144 


16,915 


1,324 



DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



White owners 

White renters 

Colored owners 

Colored renters 

Other 


253 

362 

21 

3 

2 


13, 276 

3,274 

49 

46 
96 


417 
77 

130 
20 
27 


1,721 
193 

1,140 
88 
38 


1, 124 

41 

621 

37 

34 


59 
2 

41 
1 
1 


1,010 

74 

786 

21 

37 


260 

163 

9 

21 


2, 102 

18 

609 

13 

38 


258 
20 

167 

15 

5 






Total 


641 


16, 74. 


671 


3,180 


1,857 


104 


1,928 


453 


2,780 


465 







DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



White owners 

White renters 

Colored owners 

Colored renters 

Other 


346 
50 
93 

2 
11 


7,467 
722 
180 
117 
651 


1,345 
91 

211 
14 
23 


1,515 

158 

466 

26 

37 


347 
17 
62 
2 

7 


246 
18 
79 
2 
2 


8,146 

289 

901 

37 

122 


1,128 

69 

61 

1 

17 


38,213 

793 

2, 658 

151 

601 


4,053 

441 

569 

7 

12 






Total 


502 


9,137 


1,684 


2, 202 


435 


347 


9,495 


1,276 


42,416 


5,082 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



White owners 

White renters 

Colored owners 

Colored renters 

Other 


1,037 
91 
96 
10 
11 


14, 384 

2,874 

9 


1,489 

75 

330 

6 

7 


2,397 

70 

533 

32 

33 


2,482 

118 

410 

22 

9 


210 

1 

30 


16, 524 

629 

2, 110 

90 

386 


127 
13 
4 
2 
1 


45, 994 

1,221 

3,256 

119 

1,003 


3,152 

293 

872 

29 

39 






Total 


1,245 


17, 267 


1,907 


3,065 


3,041 


241 


19,739 


147 


51,593 









358 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



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APPENDICES. 



APPENDIX I. 

WAR DEPARTMENT ORDER ORGANIZING THE CENSUS. 

War Department, 
Washington, D. ('., Septembers, 1899. 

I. By direction of the President, a census of the population, of the agricultural 
products, and of the educational conditions of Porto Rico shall be taken on the 10th 
day of November, and completed by or before the 20th day of December, 1899. 

II. Lieut. Col. J. P. Sanger, Inspector-General, is appointed Director of the Census, 
with office in Washington. It is made his duty to superintend and direct the taking 
of the census, and to perform such other duties as may be required of him. 

III. Mr. Harrison Dingman is appointed Assistant Director of the Census, with 
office in the city of San Juan, Porto Rico, and is charged, under the direction of the 
Director of the Census, with the collection of the information required by this order 
and such instructions as may be issued. 

He will fill all vacancies which may occur among the supervisors of the census and 
will appoint all enumerators and such special agents as may be necessary, reporting 
his action to the Director of the Census. 

IV. For the purpose of this census the island of Porto Rico is divided into seven 
census departments, and the following-named citizens of Porto Rico, nominated by 
the Military Governor, are hereby appointed supervisors of census: 

1. Ricardo Hernandez, census department Bayamon. 

2. Felix Seijo, census department Arecibo. 

3. Luis A. Torregrosa, census department Aguadilla. 

4. Manuel Badrena, census department Mayaguez. 

5. Enrique Colom, census department Ponce. 

6. Luis Mufioz Morales, census department Guayama. 

7. Guillermo Riekohl, census department Humacao. 

(The islands of Vieques and Culebra are a part of the census department of Humacao; 
the island of Mona, a part of the census department of Mayaguez. ) 

Each supervisor shall be duly commissioned by the Secretary of War, and shall be 
sworn to the faithful performance of duties by the Director or Assistant Director of 
the Census, or by any civil or military officer authorized to administer oaths in the 
form and manner prescribed by the Secretary of War. 

V. Each supervisor of census shall be charged with the performance, within 
his department, of the following duties: To consult with the Assistant Director of 
the Census in regard to the division of his department into enumeration districts 
most convenient for the purpose of enumeration, which districts shall be declared 
and the boundaries thereof fixed by the Assistant Director of the Census; to nomi- 
nate to him suitable persons as enumerators within his department, one for each 
enumeration district and resident therein; but in case it shall occur in any enumera- 
tion district that no person qualified to perform and willing to undertake the duties 

361 



362 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

of enumerator resides in that department, the supervisor may appoint any fit person 
to be the enumerator of that district; to communicate to enumerators the necessary 
instructions and directions relating to their duties, to examine and scrutinize the 
returns of the enumerators, and in event of discrepancies or deficiencies appearing 
in the returns for his department, to use all diligence in causing the same to be cor- 
rected and supplied; to forward to the Assistant Director of the Census the complete 
returns for his census department in such time and manner as shall be prescribed by 
said officer. He will also make up and forward to the disbursing officer of the army 
designated to make payments in his department, not later than the 25th of each 
month, the accounts required for ascertaining the amount of compensation due him- 
self, each enumerator in his department, his clerk and messenger, his office rent, 
and current expenses, which accounts shall be duly certified as true and correct by 
the supervisor, and said accounts so certified shall be accepted by the disbursing 
officer so designated, and payment thereon shall be made by draft in favor of each 
person to whom payment is due. The accounts of enumerators will be sworn to by 
them and certified as true and correct by the supervisors. The duties imposed upon 
the supervisors by this order shall be performed, in any and all particulars, in 
accordance with the instructions and directions of the Secretary of War, and any 
supervisor who may abandon, neglect, or improperly perform the duties required of 
him by this order and the instructions he may receive, may be removed by the 
Assistant Director of the Census, who will report his action to the Director of the 
Census. 

VI. Each enumerator shall be duly commissioned by the Secretary of War, and 
shall be sworn to the faithful performance of his duty by the supervisor of census, 
or by any civil or military officer authorized to administer oaths, and in the form 
and manner prescribed by the Secretary of War. 

VII. Each enumerator shall be charged with the collection, in his district, of the 
facts and statistics required by the population schedule, and such other schedules as 
the Secretary of War may determine shall be used by him in connection with the 
census. It shall be the duty of each enumerator to visit personally each dwelling 
house in his district, and each family therein, and each individual living out of a 
family in any place of abode, and by inquiry made of the head of each family, or of 
the member thereof deemed most credible and worthy of trust, or of such individual 
living out of a family, to obtain each and every item of information and all the par- 
ticulars required by the order prescribed as of the date November 10, 1899. And in 
case no person shall be found at the usual place of abode of such family, or individual 
living out of a family, competent to answer the inquiries made in compliance with 
the requirements of this order, then it shall be lawful for the enumerator to obtain 
the required information, as near as may be practicable, from the family or families, 
or person or persons, living nearest to such place of abode; and it shall be the duty 
of each enumerator to forward the original schedules, duly certified, to the supervisor 
of census of his census department as his returns under the provisions of this order, 
and in the event of discrepancies or deficiencies being discovered in his said returns 
he shall use all diligence in correcting or supplying the same. In case the district 
assigned any enumerator embraces all or any part of any incorporated township, vil- 
lage, town, or city, and also other territory not included within the limits of such 
incorporated township, village, town, or city, or either, it shall be the duty of the 
enumerator of such district to clearly and plainly distinguish and separate, upon the 
population schedules, the inhabitants of all or any part of such township, village, 
town, or city, as may be embraced in the district assigned to such enumerator, from 
the inhabitants of the territorry not included therein. No enumerator shall be 
deemed qualified to enter upon his duties until he has received from the supervisor 
of census of the census department to which he belongs the commission authorizing 
him to perform the duties of enumerator. 



APPENDICES. 363 

VIII. The district assigned to any enumerator shall not exceed 1,500 inhabitants 
for urban and 1,000 inhabitants for suburban or rural districts, as near as may be, 
according to estimates based on the preceding census or other reliable information, 
and the boundaries of all enumeration districts shall be clearly described by civil 
divisions, rivers, roads, public surveys, or other easily distinguished lines: Provided, 
That enumerators may be assigned for the special enumeration of institutions, when 
desirable, without reference to the number of inmates. 

IX. Any supervisor of the census may, with the approval of the Assistant Director 
of the Census, remove any enumerator in his department and rill the vacancy thus 
caused or otherwise occurring. Whenever it sball appear that any portion of 
the enumeration and census provided for in this order has been negligently or 
improperly taken, and is by reason thereof incomplete or erroneous, the Assistant 
Director of the Census may cause such incomplete and unsatisfactory enumeration 
and census to be amended or made anew under such methods as may in his discretion 
be practicable. 

X. The Assistant Director of the Census may authorize and direct supervisors of 
the census to employ interpreters to assist the enumerators of their respective dis- 
tricts in the enumeration of persons not speaking the language of the country, the 
compensation of such interpreters not to exceed three dollars per day for each day 
actually and necessarily employed. 

XL No supervisor's clerk, interpreter, special agent, or other official shall enter 
upon. his duties until he has taken and subscribed to the oath or affirmation pre- 
scribed by the Secretary of War; and no supervisor, supervisor's clerk, enumerator, 
or special agent shall be accompanied by or assisted in the performance of his duties 
by any person not duly appointed as an officer or employee of the Porto Rican census, 
and to whom an oath or affirmation has not been duly administered. All appointees 
and employees provided for in this order shall be appointed or employed solely with 
reference to their fitness to perform the duties of the position to which they may be 
appointed. 

XII. The enumeration of the population required by this order shall commence on 
the 10th day of November, 1899, and be taken as of that date. And it shall be the 
duty of each enumerator to complete the enumeration of his district and to prepare 
the returns hereinbefore required to be made, and to forward the same to the super- 
visor of the census of his department on or before the 20th day of December, 1899. 

XIII. If any person shall receive or secure to himself any fee, reward, or compen- 
sation as a onsideration for the appointment or employment of any person as enu- 
merator or clerk or other employee, or shall in any way receive or secure to himself 
any part of the compensation to be paid for the services of any enumerator or clerk 
or other employee, he shall be deemed guilt}' of a misdemeanor, and on conviction 
thereof shall be fined not more than $1,000, or be imprisoned not more than one year, 
or both. 

XIV. If any supervisor, supervisor's clerk, enumerator, interpreter, special agent, 
or other employee, who, having taken and subscribed the oath of office required by 
this order, shall, without justifiable cause, neglect or refuse to perform the duties 
enjoined on him by this order, or shall, without the authority of the Director of the 
Census, communicate to any person not authorized to receive the same any infor- 
mation gained by him in the performance of his duties, he shall be deemed guilty of 
a misdemeanor, and upon conviction shall be fined not exceeding $500; or if he shall 
willfully and knowingly swear or affirm falsely, he shall be deemed guilty of perjury, 
and upon conviction thereof shall be imprisoned not exceeding two years, and shall 
be fined not exceeding $500; or if he shall willfully and knowingly make a false cer- 
tificate or a fictitious return, he shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon convic- 
tion of either of the last-named offenses he shall be fined not exceeding $2,000 ami 
be imprisoned not exceeding two years. 



364 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

XV. Each and every person more than 20 years of age belonging to any family 
residing in any enumeration district, and in case of the absence of the heads and 
other members of any such family, then any representative of such family, shall 
be, and each of them hereby is, required, if thereto requested by the Assistant 
Director, supervisor, or enumerator, to render a true account, to the best of his or her 
knowledge, of every person belonging to such family in the various particulars 
required, and whoever shall willfully fail or refuse to render such true account shall 
be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be fined in a sum not 
exceeding $100. And every president, treasurer, secretary, director, agent, or other 
officer of every corporation, and every establishment of productive industry, whether 
conducted as a corporate body, limited liability company, or by private individuals, 
from which answers to any of the schedules, inquiries, or statistical interrogatories 
provided for by this order are herein required, who shall if thereto requested by the 
Assistant Director, supervisor, enumerator, or special agent, willfully neglect or refuse 
to give true and complete answers to any inquiries authorized by this order, or shall 
willfully give false information, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon convic- 
tion thereof shall be fined not exceeding $8,000, to which may be added imprison- 
ment for a period not exceeding one year. 

XVI. All fines and penalties imposed in this order shall be enforced by due legal 
process in the supreme court, and the courts of the judicial districts of the island, 
according to the nature and degree of the offense, and they are hereby granted juris- 
diction for this purpose. 

XVII. The Director of the Census may authorize the expenditure of necessary 
sums for the traveling expenses of the officers and employees of the census and the 
incidental expenses essential to the carrying out of this order as herein provided for, 
and not otherwise, including the rental of offices for the Assistant Director and super- 
visors of the census, and the furnishing thereof. 

XVIII. All mail matter of whatever class, relative to the Porto Rican census and 
addressed to the Director, Assistant Director, or any supervisor or enumerator of the 
census, and indorsed "Official Business, War Department, Porto Rican Census," 
shall be transported free of postage; and all telegrams relative to the Porto Rican 
census sent or received by the officials aforesaid, shall be free of charge; and if any 
person shall make use of the postal and telegraph franking privileges herein granted, 
to avoid the payment of postage or telegraph charges on a private message, letter, 
package, or other matter sent by mail or telegraph, the person so offending shall be 
guilty of a misdemeanor and subject to a fine of $300. 

XIX. The Director of the Census is hereby authorized to print and bind such 
blanks, circulars, envelopes, and other items as may be necessary, and to tabulate, 
print, publish, and distribute the results of this census. 

XX. The expenses of taking the Porto Rican census, including the pay and allow- 
ance of civil officials and employees, shall be paid from the revenues of Porto Rico, 
and the Military Governor of Porto Rico will nominate one of the disbursing officers 
of the army in each census department to act as paymaster, who shall be provided 
with the necessary funds and who shall make disbursements in behalf of the Porto 
Rican census, according to such instructions and under such regulations as may be 
prescribed by the Secretary of War. The names, rank, and stations of the officers so 
nominated will be communicated to the Adjutant-General of the Army by the Mili- 
tary Governor of Porto Rico, and will be announced in War Department orders. 

XXI. The Military Governor of Porto Rico, and all civil and military officers in the 
island, will render such assistance to the Director, Assistant Director, supervisors, and 
enumerators of the Porto Rican census, as may be necessary to enable them to carry 
into effect the provisions of this order. 

Elihu Root, 

Secretary of War. 



APPENDICES. 



365 



APPENDIX II. 

WAR DEPARTMENT ORDER ORGANIZING THE CENSUS. 

War Department, 
Washington, September 22, 1899. 

I. The following-named officers nominated by the Military Governor of Porto 
Rico are appointed disbursing officers of the Porto Rican census, and will be 
respected accordingly: 

Maj. Charles L. Davis, Eleventh Infantry, census department of Bayamon. 
Capt. A. C. Macomb, Fifth Cavalry, census department of Arecibo. 
Lieut. S. G. Chiles, Eleventh Infantry, census department of Aguadilla. 
Capt. P. M. Travis, Eleventh Infantry, census department of Mayaguez. 
Maj. F. W. Mansfield, Eleventh Infantry, census department of Ponce. 
Capt. F. W. Foster, Fifth Cavalry, census department of Guayama. 
Capt. Eben Swift, Fifth Cavalry, census department of Humacao. 

II. Disbursing officers will pay the compensation of the Assistant Director, super- 
visors, enumerators, clerks, and other employees of the census, the rent of the offices 
of the Assistant Director and supervisors, the purchase or rental of office furni- 
ture, transportation and telegraph vouchers, the expenses of travel of officers and 
employees, as established by the Secretary of War, and such incidental expenses as 
may be authorized by the Director of the Census under paragraphs XVII and XIX of 
the order of the President for taking the census of Porto Rico. 

III. In making expenditures and keeping their accounts, disbursing officers will 
be governed by the rules and instructions applicable to the revenues of Porto Rico 
established by the President: Provided, That the accounts of expenditures in behalf 
of the census of Porto Rico shall be kept separately from all other accounts and fur- 
nished in this form to the War Department. 

IV. Disbursing officers will be stationed in the principal cities of their respective 
census departments and will communicate, without delay, with the supervisors of 
census, and will give them such information as to preparing their vouchers and keep- 
ing their accounts as may be necessary to the prompt settlement of all indebtedness. 

Elihu Root, 

Secretary of War. 



APPENDIX III. 
ENUMERATION DISTRICTS AND ENUMERATORS. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA. 



Enumeration districts. 



Designation. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT AGUADILLA 

Barrio Nuevo 

Tamarindo 

Santa Barbara 

Iglesia and Higuey 

Montana 

Guerrero 

Corrales and Caimital alto 

Caimital bajo 

Malesas alta 

Aguaeate and Arenales 

Malesas baja 

Ceiba alta and Ceiba baja 

Camaseyes 

Borinquen 

Victoria 

Palmar 



Enumerators. 



Belen Vasquez. 

Augusto Reichard del Valle. 

Seflorita Julia Calvente. 

Jose Varela. 

Ramon Varela. 

Juan Roque. 

Jose Colmenero. 

Aurco Antonio Sanchez. 

Ramon Garcia. 

Jose Verny Garcia. 

Francisco Bocanegra Nunez. 

Alfredo Platet. 

Domingo Molinary. 

Manuel Ma. Arroyo. 

Pablo Alvarey. 

Arturo Schulze. 



366 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



Enumeration districts and enumerators — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA— Continued. 



Enumeration districts 



No. 



Designation. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT AUUADA. 



Rosario 

California 

Guanaguilla 

Atalaya 

Jaguey 

Cerro Gordo 

Carrizal 

Espinal 

Cruces 

Guayabo 

Rio Grande 

Lagunas 

Marias 

Naranjo 

Piedras Blancas 

Asomante 

Mal-paso 

Guanabanas 

Mamey 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT ISABEI.A. 



Enumerators. 



Pueblo 

Guayabos 

Mora 

Coto 

Galateo bajo 

Galateo alto 

Llanadas(A) 

Llanadas(B) 

Planas 

Bajura 

Jobos (A) 

Jobos (B) 

Bejucos 

Guerrero 

Arenales bajos 

Arenales altos (A) 
Arenales altos (B) 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT MOCA. 



Pueblo 

Cruz 

Voladoras... 

Capa 

Roeha 

Cuchilla 

Aceicuna 

Centro 

Maria 

Naranjo 

Cerro Gordo 
Plata 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT RINCON. 



Poblacion. 

Pueblo 

Calvache.. 
Barrero . . . 
Atalaya . . . 

Jaguey 

Cruz 



Rio Grande , 
Puntas 

Ensenada . . 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT SAN SEBASTIAN". 

Urrejola 

Norzagaray 

Piedras Blancas 

Cidral 

Hato arriba 

Pozas 

Culebrinas 

Perchas No. 1 

Perchas No. 2 

Magos 



Sefiorita Ynez Sola. 

Do. 

Do. 
Luis Mendez Cordona. 

Do. 
Celestino Moret. 
Francisco de Cordona. 

Do. 
Luis Natalio Maisonare. 

Do. 

Do. 
Ramon Arrogo. 
Benito Sola. 
Federico Torres. 
Antonio Rivas. 

Do. 
Juan Gonzalez. 

Do. 
Ramon Vera v. 



Sefiorita Candida del Valle. 

Manuel Perez. 

Pedro Ruiz. 

Celedonia Garcia. 

Pedro Celestino Verez. 

Jose Vargas. 

Lino Garcia. 

Ricardo de la Cruz. 

Pio Camacho. 

Antonio Pina. 

Fernando Domenech. 

Santiago Domenech. 

Nicandro Garcia Rosario. 

Eloy Utrina. 

Sefiorita Ana Elisa del Valle. 

Evaristo la Bastida. 

Sefiorita Milagros la Bastida. 



Sefiorita Josefa Cedron. 
Adolfo Babilonia. 
Juan Carrasco. 
Tadeo Chamaco. 
Francisco Suarez. 
Donato Gonzalez. 
Eduardo Mendez. 
Pedro Pagan. 
Ricardo Cedron. 
Julio Veray Garcia. 
Gonzalo Gonzalez. 
Juan Pedro Varela. 



Sefiorita Juana Bencgas. 

Do. 
Ramon Arrogo. 
Jose F. Echeandia. 

Do. 
Nicolas Rivas. 
Ricardo Cumpiano. 
Jose Montilla. 
Antonio Velez. 
Felix Colon. 



Sefiorita Ana Mendez. 

Do. 
Joaquin Colon. 

Do. 
Segundo Esteres. 
Joaquin Moreno. 

Do. 
Demetrio Hernandez. 

Do. 
Termino Liciago. 



APPENDICES. 



367 



Enumeration districts and enumerators — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF AGUADILLA— Continued. 



Enumeration districts. 



Designation. 



municipal district san Sebastian — continued 

Enea 

Juncal 

Altosano 

Sonador 

Guacio 

Mirabeles 

Calabazas 

Hoya mala 

Aibonito 

Guajataca 

Cibao 

Robles 

Salto 

Guatemala 

Bahomamey 

MUNICIPAL district lares. 

Poblacion (A) 

Poblacion (B ) 

Pueblo ( A ) 

Pueblo (B) 

Espino (A) 

Espino (B) - 

Callejones (A) 

Callejones (B) 

Piletas ( A ) 

Piletas (B) 

Lares (A) 

Lares (B) 

Latorre (A) 

Latorre (B) 

Buenos-Aires (A) 

Buenos- Aires ( B ) 

Mirasol 

Bartolo (A) 

Bartolo ( B) 

Pezuela 

Rio Prieto (A) 

Rio Prieto (B) 



Enumerators. 



Termino Liciago. 
Francisco Antonio Cebellerc 
Termino B. Lopez. 

Do. 
Emiliano Rosa. 
Andres Beauchamp. 
Ramon Vina. 
Ulpiano Mendez, 
Manuel Ramirez. 
Modesto Cariel. 

Do. 
Jose Ramirez Arelano. 

Do. 
Adolfo Polidura. 

Do. 



Sefiorita Carmen Levis. 
Jose Saldana. 
Francisco Marcauo. 
Sixto Toro. 
Jorge Ferrer. 
Francisco Ramirez. 
Daniel Rodriguez. 
Clemerito Millan. 
Gerardo Mendez Serrano. 
Edelmiro Mendez Serrano. 
Gabriel Ornes. 
Juan Ornes. 
Jose Edurigis Gonzalez. 
Rodolfo Rodriguez. 
Vicento Indico. 
Dionisio Reyes. 
Antonio Fout. 
Manuel Bernal. 
Rafael Jiran. 
Manuel Eschavaria. 
Sixto Saldana. 
Vicente Vina, 2d. 



DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO. 



municipal district utuado. 



Arenas 

do 

Angeles 

do 

Caonillas Abajo.. 
do 

Caonillas Arriba . 

Caguana 

9 | do 

10 Caniaco 

11 I Utuado (city) ... 
do 

Consejo 

Don Alonso 

do 

Guaonico 

Jayuya abajo 

.....do 

do 

Jayuya arriba ... 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Limon 

Mam eyes Abajo.. 
do 

Mameyes Arriba . 
do". 

Las Pal mas 

Paso Palma 



Juan Lazus. 
Angel Padro. 
Jose Julia. 
Ysidro A. Marin. 
Saturnino Matos. 
Brenturo Mattei. 
Manuel Ruiz Alvarez. 
Genaro Porrata. 
Jose Martin Gonzalez. 
Tomas Jordan Miranda. 
Francisco de B. Martinez. 
Luis Jordan Cowea. 
Julio Seijo Rivera. 
T. Ramon Muniz. 
Jose Santana Cintron. 
Nicolas de Jesus. 
Ulises Seijo. 
Nicolas Cordova. 
Rafael Lopez. 
Ricardo Serbia. 
Adolfo Padron. 
Frutos Porrata. 
Baldomero Miranda. 
Jose Lopez. 
Manuel Niruet. 
Genaro Gimenez. 
Antonio Tulla. 
Francisco de Jesus. 
Jose de Jesus. 
Jose Matos. 
Ricardo Jordan. 



368 KEPOKT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Enumeration districts and enumerators — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBC-Continued. 



Enumeration districts. 



Designation. 



municipal district UTUADo — continued. 



32 Rio Abajo 

33 Roncador 

34 Sal to abajo 

35 Salto arriba 

36 Sabana Grande 

37 ; Santa Isabel . . . 

38 Santa Rosa 

39 i Tetuan 

40 do 

41 Vivi abajo 

42 Vivi arriba 

43 do 

Special agent . . 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT A.RECIBO. 



Arenalejos 

Arrozal 

do 

Cambalache . . 
Dominguito.. . 
Domingo Ruiz 

Factor 

Garrochales 

Hato abajo 

do 

Hato arriba . . . 

do 

Hato viejo 

do 

do 

Islote 

do 

Carrera 

Esperanza 

do 

do 

Miraflores 

do 

Arecibo (city) .. 

do 

do 

do 

....do 

Rio arriba 

....do 

Sabana Hoyos.. 

....do 

do 

San tana 

do 

Tanama 

Special agent .. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT QUEBRADILLAS. 

Cacaos 

Cocos 

Charcas 

Guajataca 

Quebradillas 

San Antonio 

do ..;.. 

San Jose 

Terranova 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT CAMUY. 



Enumerators. 



Abra honda 

Camuy arriba ' 

Cienega 

Cibao ~\ 

Membrillo 

Camuy 

Puente " 

Puertos 

Piedra Gorda 

Quebrada 

Santiago '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. ...\ OsvaldcTLeon.' 



Octavio Jordan Miranda. 

Jose D. Espada. 

Manuel Jordon. 

Manuel Palop. 

Luis Baldoni. 

Antonio Guzman Rodriguez. 

Pablo Blanes Caban. 

Luis Pio Toro. 

Francisco Arabia. 

Federico M. Maestre. 

Galo Martinez. 

Jose Casalduc Roig. 

Juan Palop. 



Aureo Silva. 
Epifanio Perez. 
Bernardo Gimenez. 
Manuel Gonzalez. 
Manuel Vinas. 
Carlos Perez. 
Agustin Costa. 
Justino Tegidot. 
Manuel Collazo. 
Gerardo Mendez. 
Melguiades Ginorio, '2 
Luis Ginorio. 
Manuel Martinez. 
Juan Rivera. 
Clodomiro Cabanas. 
Juan Marin Ginorio. 
Jose Gonzalez. 
Ramon Castro. 
Vicente Aguirre. 
Antonio Cabanas. 
Ulises Ginorio. 
Waldemar Bit-hone. 
Jose S. Rossello. 
Gonzalo Gandhi. 
Marcelino Andino. 
Miguel A. Balseiro. 
Epifanio Miranda. 
Senorita Lina Silva. 
Joaquin Sanchez. 
Jose Munoz Belaval. 
Modesto Varona. 
Jose Florido. 
Fidel Gonzalez. 
Julio Seijo Tavarez. 
Alberto Ball. 
Armindo Cadilla. 
D.Santiago Seijo. 



Manuel Espinosa. 
Mariano Cruz. 
Arturo Deliz. 
Osvaldo Perez. 
Guillermo Abraans. 
Jorge Marena. 
Rafael Lopez Marichal. 
Santiago Llovera. 
Alejandro Abraans. 



Pastor del Valle. 
Jose Pamis. 
Guillermo Yglesias. 
Jesus Mjirrero. 
Eusebio Vales. 
Manuel Aguirre. 
Francisco Bettram. 
Gregorio Rivera. 
Vicente Nieves. 
Santiago Rivera. 



APPENDICES. 



369 



Enumeration districts and enumerators — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO— Continued. 



Enumeration districts. 


Enumerators. 




No. 


Designation. 




100 


municipal district camuy — continued. 


Nicolas Cazuela. 
Juan B. Echeandia. 
Juan Lacomba. 

Cristeto de Arce. 
Dario Ruiz. 
Jose Canino. 
Francisco S. Alonso. 
Eugenio Rubio. 
Fernando Lacomba. 
Francisco Arteaga. 
Calixto Serbia. 
Pedro S. Navas. 
Manuel Lacomba. 
Juan R. Alonso. 
Francisco Migolla. 

Genaro Marchan. 
Francisco Davila. 
Ventura Rodriguez. 
Juan Marchan. 
Ricardo Gil. 
Ynocente Rivera. 
Jose Rosario. 
Eduardo Menendez. 
Enrique Lopez. 
Tomas Agrait Delgado. 
Nepomucens Flores. 

Manuel Villamil. 
Alberto Gandia. 
Juan Ramos. 
Lucas Gutierrez. 
Jose Menendez. 
Bernardo Blandino. 
Ramon Ramos Casellas. 
Mario San tana. 
Fernando Medina. 
Enrique Villamil. 
Teodoro Remas Velez. 
Leopoldo Santana. 
Agustin Collazo. 
Jose Ramos Casellas. 
Jose Montanez. 

Juan Collazo. 
Juan Amezaga. 
Jose Pareo. 
Miguel Miranda. 
Mariano Alfaro, 1st. 
Jose E. Marrero. 
Serafin Cordero. 
Mariano Alfaro, 2d. 
Eusebio Yturrino. 




101 












10'? 


MUNICIPAL DISTRICT HATILLO. 




TOR 


do 




104 






105 






106 






107 






108 






109 






110 






111 






11? 






113 






114 


MUNICIPAL DISTRICT BARCELONETA. 




115 


do 




116 


do 




117 


.....do 




118 


Florida adentro 




119 


do 




T>0 


do 




1?1 


Garrochales 




1W 






ra 


Barceloneta 






Special agent 




1?4 


MUNICIPAL DISTRICT MANATI. 

Bajura adentra 




1?5 






1?6 


Coto 




127 


do 




129 
130 
131 


do 

....do 




132 
133 


do 




134 
135 
136 
137 


do 

Tierras nuevas Poniente 

do 










138 
139 
140 


MUNICIPAL DISTRICT MOROVIS. 

Barahona 

Cuchilla 




141 






14? 






143 






144 






145 
146 
147 


Percha 

Morovis 




148 
149 
150 
151 


San Lorenzo 

Torrecilla 

Unibon 


Andres Otero. 
Herminio Miranda. 
Zacarias Cordero. 
Jose Miranda Gonzalez. 

Francisco Matter Rodriguez. 
Felipe Lopez Amber. 
Elviro Rodriguez. 
Francisco Coweger. 
Jose Dolores Padro. 
Casiano Mediavilla. 
Segundo Roman. 
Salustiano Villamil. 
1 Miguel de Jesus. 




152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 


MUNICIPAL DISTRICT CIALES. 

Cialitos 

do 

do 

Cordillera 

Fronton 

do 

do 

do 

8490—00 — -24 





870 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Enumeration districts and enumerators— Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF ARECIBO— Continued. 



Enumeration districts. 



No. 



161 
162 
163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
168 
169 



170 



Designation. 



iunicipal district ciales— continued. 



Hato Viejo 

do 

Pesa 

Pozas 

do 

do 

Ciales 

Toro Negro . . . 

do 

Special agent 



Enumerators. 



municipal district utuado. 



Monserrate Padro. 
Ramon Fernandez Negron. 
Carlos Dominguez. 
Antonio Pouza. 
Jose Rodriguez. 
Agripino Padro. 
Andres Quintana. 
Arturo Davila. 
Toiniano Rodriguez. 
Ceferino Nieves. 



Sefiorita Juana Baldoni. 



DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT SAN JUAN. 

„ nl . Jose Atiles. 

f, allaj ^ ... Carlos Areizaga. 

Mercado \\\\\Y/// ".'.'.'.'".'".'.'." I Jose Calderon Aponte 

Catedral 

....do 

Caleta - 

....do 

....do 

San Cristobal 

do 

do 

Teatro 

do 

San Francisco 

Marina 

do 

Puerta de Tierra 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Santurce 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do 

Especial 

do 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT BAYAMON. 



30 
31 
32 
33 

34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 



Pueblo 

....do 

....do 

Catano 

....do 

Juan Sanchez 

HatoTeja 

Pajaros 

Minillas 

....do 

Cerro Gordo 

Buena Vista 

Santa Olaya 

Dajaos 

Nuevo ■ 

Pueblo Viejo 

Guaynabo 

Santa Rosa 

Camarones 

Guaraguaos abajo 

Guaraguaos arriba 

Guaraguaos de Guaynabo 
Sonadora 



Manuel Torres Borges. 
Heraclio Cordero. 
Rafael Cabrera. 
Juan Echevarria. 
Jesus Jiminez. 
Francisco Garavis. 
Jose Aldea. 
Enrique Power. 
Nicolas G. Quevedo. 
Jose Soto Rodriguez. 
Angel Santaella. 
Ramon Vara. 
Luis Jorge Rivera. 
Carlos Gordils. 
Pedro Capo. 
Leandro Delgado. 
Pedro Gomez. 
Juan Roura. 
Antonio Gonzalez. 
Sebastian Moll. 
Mariano Pesquera. 
Celso G. Villar. 
Antonio Cordero. 
Arturo Vizcarrondo. 
Simon Bolhm. 
Jose A. Cabrera. 



Palmas.. ."""-"".""."""--- Luis Bozzo. 



Jose de J. Pesquera. 
Jose Nater Landron. 
Manuel Colon Dueno. 
Juan Valencia Gomez. 
Justo Morales. 
Pedro de Angelis. 
Ricardo Santaella. 
Jose E. Marquez. 
Eusebio Vizcarrondo. 
Francisco Barbosa. 
Enrique Costoso. 
Jose Cantellop. 
Luis Monclova Cestero. 
Hipolito Gimenez. 
Luis Schroder. 
Anastasio Castro. 
Luis Venegas. 
Antonio Rivera y Rivera. 
Rafael Minosa. 
Antonio Rodriguez. 
Manuel Loubriel. 
Joaquin Alum. 
Felipe Flores Negron. 



APPENDICES. 



371 



Enumeration districts and enumerators — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON— Continued. 



Enumeration districts. 



Designation. 



Enumerators. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT TOA ALTA. 

Pueblo 

Mucarabonaz 

Pinas 

Ortiz 

Quebrada Cruz Abajo 

Quebrada Cruz B 

Rio Lajas 

Galatea 

Quebrada Arenas 

Contorno 

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT TOA BAJA. 

Pueblo 

Candelaria Arriba 

Candelaria Baja 

Media Luna 

Sabana Seca 

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT DORADO. 

Pueblo Alto 

Pueblo Bajo 

Mameyal 

Higuillar 

Maguayo 

Espinosa 

Rio Lajas 

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT VEGA ALTA 

Pueblo 

Bajura 

Candelaria 

Novillo 

Maricao 

Espinosa 

Sabana 

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT VEGA BAJA, 

Pueblo Alto 

Pueblo Bajo 

Algarrobo 

Puerto Nnevo 

Yeguada 

Pugnado Afuera 

Pugnado Adentro 

Quebrada Arenas 

Cabo Caribe 

Cibuco 

Rio arriba and Rio abajo 

Ceiba 

Almirante Norte 

Almirante Sur 

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT COROZAL. 

Pueblo 

Cubrico 

Dos Bocas 

Padilla 

Cuchillas 

Negros 

Magueyes 

Palmarito 

Maria 

Palos Blancos 

Palmarejo 

Abras 

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT NARANJITO. 

Pueblo 

Nuevo 

Guadiana 

Achiote 

Loinaz 

Cedro abajo 

Cedro arriba 

Anones 



Enrique Yzquierdo. 
Jose M. Perez. 
Rafael Diaz. 
Alvaro Diaz. 
Evaristo Catranes. 
Cesar Romero. 
Cornelio Cintron. 
Jesus Rivera. 
Carmelo Perez. 
Jesus Hernandez. 



Juan Bautista Romero. 
Mariano Vargas. 
Francisco Hernandez. 
Jesus Rodriguez. 
Francisco Cordova. 



Fernando del Valle. 
Arturo Tulier Ramos. 
Severo Tulier. 
Juan de Jesus Arrogo. 
Saturnino I. Vargas. 
Juan Valderama. 
Emelino Rodriguez. 



Justo Nieves. 

Jose Labrador. 

Manuel Cordova. 

Abelardo Malpica. 

Juan Rivera. 

Juan Ponsa. 

.Severo Davila Gonzalez. 



Jose C. Martinez. 
Jose Davila Martinez. 
Santiago Perez. 
Jose Robles Pastor. 
Rodriguez Vicento. 
Joaquin Perez. 
Herminio Davila Perez. 
Fernando Saldana. 
Ramon Carreras Perez. 
Armando Landron Lopez. 
Enrique Marchessi. 
Alfredo Batalla. 
Maria Enrique Vara. 
Adolf o Marchessi. 



James N. Chapman. 
Ramon Fuentes Rivera. 
Francisco R. Garcias. 
Jose Soto. 
Jose P. Soto. 
Ramon Ybanez. 
Jose Prado. 
Candido Prado. 
Jose Bon. 
Julio Rodriguez. 
Ramon Furnier. 
Sabrado Lopez. 



Modesta Archilla. 
Agustin Langier. 
Alfredo Archilla. 
Jose Ygaravidez Gutierrez. 
Ramon Castro. 
Francisco Barreras. 
Jose Barreras. 
Maximino Rivera. 



372 "REPOBT ON" THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Enumeration districts and enumerators — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF BAYAMON— Continued. 



Enumeration districts. 



Designation. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT RIO PIEDRAS. 



Enumerators. 



Pueblo (A) Mario Bran. 

Pueblo (B) ! Felix Padial. 

Hato Rey ' Antonio Godinez. 

Sabana Liana i Francisco Nogueras. 

Monacillo Joaquin Solis. 

Cupey (A) : Jose B. Quiara. 

< 'upey ( B) Jose Chamonier. 

Caimito alto I Juan Nogueras. 

Caimito bajo Rafael Rivera Rodriguez. 

Frailes Artena Molina. 

Rio Jose E. Amy. 

Tortugo , Rafael Mufloz. 

Mamey i Antonio Garcia. 

Hato Nuevo ! Jose Navarro. 

Quebrada Arenas Enrique Contreras. 



Ramiro Matute. 
Carlos Roure. 
Angel Quifiones. 
Damiano Rodriguez. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT RIO GRANDE. 

Pueblo 

Zabana 

Mata de Platano 

Herrera 

Zarzal I Antoirio Mellador 

Jimenez Alto j Francisco Baston. 

Jimenez Bajo Teofilo Quifiones. 

Jimenez Centro i Juan Ros, 2d. 

Guzman arriba j j 0S e del Rivera. 

Guzman abajo Pedro Sepulredo. 

Cienega i Timoteo S. Bermudez. 

Mameyes (A) Fernando Noceda de la Garcia, 

Mameyes (B) j j ua n Garcia y Alvalo. 

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT CAROLINA. 

Pueblo (A) | Adolfo Mercado. 

Pueblo (B) Ysidoro Esturio. 

Hoyo-Mulas | Justino Carrion. 

Martin Gonzalez ! Ygnacio Martin. 

sabana abaja Francisco Dobal. 

San Antonio Julio Rengel. 

Cangrejos Luis Blanco Abella . 

Trujillo bajo Miguel Quifionez. 

Borrasa alto Francisco O'Neill Giminez. 



Borrasa bajo 
Santa Cruz . . 

Cacao 

Cedros 

Carruzos 

Canovanillas 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT LOIZA. 



Pueblo 

Mediania Baja. .. 
Mediania Alta . . . 
Torrecillas (A)... 
Torrecillas (B)... 
Canovanas (A.)... 
Canovanas (B)... 
Hato-Puerco (A). 
Hato-Puerco (B). 
Hato-Puerco (C) . 

Lomas 

Cubeu 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT TRUJILLO ALTO. 

Pueblo 

Cuevas [[[[ 

Carraiza '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Quebrada Grande 

Quebrada Inflerno 

Hato Viejo 



Manuel Gardon. 
Manuel Callejo Fernandez. 
Eduardo Monclora. 
Jose Galinanes. 
Ramon Rodriguez. 
Evaristo Velez. 



Rafael Melendez Rodriguez. 

Rafael Comoriero Rodriguez. 

Jorge Adzuar. 

Antero Adzuar. 

Jose Arrufat. 

Alvaro Padial. 

Antonio Garavis. 

Antonio Comineco Rodriguez. 

Agustin Sanchez. 

Jose Aybar. 

Francisco Bonet Arecil. 

Ramon Guillew. 



Andres Reyes Barcarcel. 
Juan Sosa Sanchez. 
Garraro Diaz y Diaz. 
Gaspar Diaz Gonzalez. 
Carlos Diaz y Diaz. 
Angel Rosa. 




ENUMERATORS OF HUMACAO. 



APPENDICES. 



373 



Enumeration districts and enumerators — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF GUAYAMA. 



Enumeration districts. 



No. 



Designation . 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT GUAYAMA. 



Pueblo 

do 

do 

Guamani 

do 

Palmas 

Carmen 

Carite 

Jobos 

Macbete 

Pozo-Hondo. 
Algarrobo... 
Caimital 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT SALINAS. 



Pueblo 

Rio Jueyes 

Lapa 

Palma 

Quebrada Yeguas . 
Aguirre 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT ARROYO. 



Pueblo . . . 

do 

Guasimas 
Palmas. . . 
Ancones . 
Laurel ... 
Pitahaya . 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT CAYEY. 



Pueblo 

do 

....do 

Rincon 

Monte Llano 

Jacome alto 

Quebrada arribsi 

Culebrasalto 

Culebras bajo . .. 

Jacome bajo 

Sumido 

Cercadillo 

Lapa 

Pedro Avila 

Pasto viejo 

Piedra 

Ma ton aba jo 

Toita 

Matonarriba 

Vegas 

Farallon 

Cedro 

Beatriz 

Guavate 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT CIDRA. 



Pueblo 

Bayamon 

Monte Llano . 

Ceiba 

Rio abajo 

Rabanal 

Salto 

Hondura 

Toita 

Sur 

Rincon 

Beatriz 

Arenas 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT AC.UAS BUENAS. 



Pueblo . . . 
Caguitas . 
Sumidero 



Enumerators. 



Luis Vernez. 

Eduardo Feannot Vasquez. 
Enrique Vidal Blondet. 
Luis Alvarez Rodriguez. 
Julio Cebollero Morales. 
Eugenio Buitrago. 
Ramon Figueroa. 
Luis Alvarez Arias. 
Adolfo Fernandez. 
Joaquin Amadeo. 
Jose Maria Orlandi. 

Do. 
Jose L. Castillo Alvarez. 



Fabian Perez. 
Enrique Colon. 
Cefenno Queno. 
Miguel Barrionuevo. 

Do. 
Manuel Candelaria. 



Federico Virella. 
Luis E. Bossolo. 
Miguel A. Rivera. 

Do. 

Do. 
Miguel Dechoudens. 
Jaime Santiago. 



Arturo Aponte Delgado. 
Juan J. Cebollero Moralez 
Federico Benet Colon. 
Pablo Giol Rivera. 

Do. 
Deogracias Gonzalez. 
Ramon Tutusaus. 

Do. 

Do. 
Rafael Osuna. 

Do. 
Jorge Vidal. 

Do. 
Eleuterio Vidal Santiago. 

Do. 
Luis Vasquez Mufloz. 

Do. 
Carlos Vallejo. 

Do. 
Nicanor Collaro Novos. 

Do. 

Do. 
Juan Gelpi Vidal. 

Do. 



Jesus Munoz Castillo. 
Ramon Ramirez. 

Do. 
Ramon Manzano. 

Do. 
Escolastico Ferrer Vasquez. 

Do. 
Sergio Santiago. 

Do. 
Ceferino Vasquez. 

Do. 
Guillermo Haddok. 

Do. 



Bartolo Esteras. 
Lisardo Lizardi. 
Ricardo Latorre Fremaint. 



374 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 



En a /iteration districts and enumerators — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OP GUAYAMA— Continued. 



Enumeration districts. 



No. 



18 



Designatiom 



municipal district aguas BUENAS— continued. 

Juan Asencio 

Bairoa 

Jagueyes 

Sonadora 

Mulas 

Mulita 

Bayamoncito 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT CAGDAS. 



Pueblo 

....do 

....do 

....do 

San Salvador 

Beatriz 

Caflabon 

Caflaboncito 

Tomas de I iastro 

San Antonio 

Rio Cafias 

Borinquen 



Bairoa . 
Turabo. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT COMKRIn. 



Pueblo . 
Pifias . 



Palomas 

Dona Elena . 

Naranjo 

Cedrito 

Cejas 

Rio Hondo . 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT ciURABO. 



Pueblo 

Hato Nuevo 

Rincon 

Jagual 

Masas 

Quebrada Infierno . 

Jagua 

Celada 

Mamey 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT SAN LORENZO. 



Pueblo 

Quebrada Honda 

Cayaguas 

Florida 

Hato 

Jagual 

Espino 

Quebrada Arena . 

Cerro Gordo 

Quebrada 

Quernado 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT JUNCOS. 



Enumerators. 



Gabriel Santiago Gonzalez. 
Jose Diaz Fontan. 

Do. 
Enrique Hernandez Batalla. 

Do. 
Jaime Marti Cuyar. 
Enrique Lizardi Colon. 



Vicente R. Munoz Barrios. 
Juan Ysern. 
Martin Delgado Roux. 
Juan Villariny Delgado. 
Pedro Rivera Vasquez. 
Vicente Munoz Grillo. 
Hermogenes Alvarez. 
Jose A. Grillo. 
Pedro Gonzalez Yglesias. 
Ramon Vega Cruz. 
Ramon Batista Cruz.' 
Pedro Bayonet Lopez. 
Julio Morillo Monies. 
Francisco Collazo Novos. 
Manuel Lizardi. 



Adolfo Toses. 
Jose Matres. 

Do. 
Neftali Mufioz. 
Norberto Rivera. 
Juan Santiago. 
Jose R. Perez. 

Do. 
Julian Santiago. 



Dr. Fernando Gonzalez. 
Eduardo Collazo Diaz. 
Ricardo Arguinzones. 
Ramon Quinoses Rieder. 

Do. 
Rafael Arguinzones. 
Braulio Calderon Davila. 
Angel Pio Ahedo Lafont. 
Severiano Vasquez. 



Avelino Sauri. 
Juan J. Davila. 

Do. 
Ygnacio Aponte. 
Jesus Gonzalez. 
Javier Velez. 
Modesto Aponte. 
Francisco Colon. 
Juan Machon. 
Aniceto Vasquez. 
Manuel Gutierrez. 



Pueblo Domingo Oiler. 

Mamey Eladio Rivera. 

Gurabo abajo Do. 

Gurabo arriba Jose Galvez Aponte. 

Caimito Do. 

Ceiba Norte _ _ _ : Bartolome Azpurna. 

Ceiba Sur i Do. 

Valenciano abajo ! Miguel Reinoso. 

Valenciano arriba ' Do. 

Lirios i Justino Schroder. 



APPENDICES. 



375 



Enumeration districts and enumerators — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO. 



Enumeration districts. 



Designation. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT MAUNABO. 



Pueblo 

Emajagua 

Quebrada Arenas and Talante . 

Calzada and Lizas 

Palo-seco 

Matuyas bajo and alto 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT PATILLAS. 



Pueblo .• 

Cacao bajo and Quebrada arriba. 

Cacao alto and Jagual 

Rio Arriba 

Mulas 

Maton and Guayabote 

Mamey and Apeadero 

Rios and Polios 

Bajo and Jacaboa. 



Enumerators. 



Rafael Ortiz. 
Emilio Calimano. 
Federico Amadeo. 
Luis Ortiz. 
Erneste Velasquez. 
Bautista Ortiz. 



Ramon Costa. 
Luis L. Cepero. 
Octavio Rivera. 
Pedro Vergne. 
Jose Mauras. 
Hemeterio Fanon. 
Antonio Capella. 
Paulino Rodriguez. 
Fernando Martinez. 



Guardarraya Pedro Aguayo. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT YABUCOA. 



Pueblo Este 

Pueblo Oeste... 

Calabazas 

Guayabota 

Guayanes 

Jacana 

Limones 

Teja 

Aguacate 

Playa 

Juan Martin . . . 
Camino Nuevo. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT HUMACAO. 



Santo Domingo , 

San Juan 

Santiago and San Francisco . 

Playa 

Marianao 

Tejas 

Anton Ruiz 

Buena Vista 

Candelero abajo 

Candelero arriba 

Catafio and Mabu 

Collores 

Mambiche and Rio abajo 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT PIEDRAS. 



42 Pueblo and Quebrada Arenas. 



Rio abajo . 

Rio arriba 

Montones abajo 

Montones arriba 

Vegas abajo 

Tejas alto 

Colores and Boqueron 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT FAJARDO. 



Ceiba and Machose 

Chupacallos and Saco 

Rio abajo and Daguao 

Quebrada Seca and Guayacan . . 

Fajardo, parte Este 

Fajardo, parte Oeste 

Sardinera and Naranjo 

Cabezas and Demajagua 

Florencio and Quebrada Vuelta 

Rio arriba 

Rio abajo 

Quebrada Fajardo 

Poblado de Luquillo 

Pitahaya 

Juan Martinez and Sabana 



Lorenzo I. Martorell. 
Jose L. Cepero. 
Jose L. Berrios. 
Luis G. Berrios. 
Nicolas Perez. 
Francisco Berrios. 
Augusto Gautier. 
Ernesto Ramos. 
Casimiro Labres. 
Jose Jesus Davila, 2d. 
Jose Ma Carrilla. 
Wistremundo Ortiz. 



Francisco Lopez. 
Exequiel Damiz. 
Aurelio Ramirez. 
Eduardo Lacroix. 
Rodolfo Porrata. 
Carlos Buitrago. 
Esteban Lavergne. 
Juan Lopez. 
Julio Monclova. 
Federico Martinez. 
Francisco Bruset. 
Adolfo Vilar. 
Emigdio Ysern. 



Cruz Baquero. 
Francisco Roig. 
Ramon Aponte. 
Francisco R. Manzanares. 
Casimiro Marquez. 
Ruperto Marquez. 
Hilario Martinez. 
Jose Casimiro Berrios. 



Guillermo R. Bird. 
Felesforo Ramirez. 
Jose Lucero. 
Anibal Mufioz. 
Manuel Guzman Benites. 
Andres Hoist. 
Yldefonso Cintron. 
Cristobal Andreu. 
Julio Erparolini. 
Estebano Guzman. 
Manuel Roman. 
Placido de la Plaza. 
Benijno Fernandez Saraso. 
Luis Benites Calzada. 
Carmelo Craca Pacheco. 



376 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OE PORTO RICO, 1899. 
Enumeration districts and enumeratms— Continued. 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMACAO-Continued. 




MUNICIPAL DISTRICT VIEQUES. 

Pueblo Vieques, parte Este 

Pueblo de Vieques, parte Oeste and Florida" W! S,™° ne1 ' 

Puerto Real arriba Juan Sam pa vo. 

Puerto Real abajo I Trinidad Quifiones. 

Mosquito and Llave Begalado Benites. 

Punta Arenas, Puerto Ferri,; auil PuertoIM^io;;;;;;; ;;; ^ u n |^^>- 

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT NAGUABO. 

Pueblo I 

Hucares Ramon J". Rodriguez 

Duque Juan P. Alberty. 

Daguao Aristarco Garcia. 

Mariana "' " , Arturo del Rivero. 

Santiago Luna and Rio I Blas Maldonado. 

Maizales Alejo Bilva. 

Rio Blanco abajo .."."." Ponero Buso Porrata. 

Rio Blanco arriba Carmelo Roman. 

Pefia-pobre . . Pablo Feliciano. 

Jose Fuentes. 

ISLA CULEBRA. 

Isla Culebra 

! Jose Amado. 



DEPARTMENT OF MAYAGUEZ. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 



Antonio Boudet. 
Juan Maria Marin 
Jose Lago Garcia. 
Alfredo N. Cuebas 
Ramon Brandes. 
Miguel Medina. 
Jose Leandro Montabos. 
Jesus Trujillo Lange 
Salvador Badrena 
Fernando del Toro 
Francisco del Valle Aran 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT MAYAGUEZ. 

Salud . 

Rio 

Carcel ./......". 

Candelaria. . . 

....do ;;; 

Marina Meridional . 

Marina Septentrional 

do 

Mayaguez arriba . . 

do 

Quemado I Belisario del Valle Aran 

Bateyes Julio Monge. 

Rio Cafias arriba .... Jose Ramirez Avilez 

Naranjales Buena Ventura Pecunia 

Juan Alonso Do. 

Limon " " " " Francisco C. Vera. 

18 Rosario Joaquin Freyre 

19 Montoso [" Manuel Gonzalez Rivera 

) Miradero ! Hermogenes Diepa 

Algarrobo "" Carmelo Besosa Peria 

Sabanetas Alfredo Guifford. 

Rio Cafias abajo Carmelo Lange. 

Leguisamo "'_ | Gerardo Venegas Gotal. 

Sabalos i Alfredo Cuebas 

• • - -do Vidal Santana. 

Guanajibo " ' - j Rafael Ganthrio Martin 



29 



Rio Hondo. . . 

Malezas 

Quebrada Grande. 



34 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT HORMIGUEROS 

Pueblo 

Guanajibo 

Hormigueros 

Jaguita " 

Lavadero 

Benavente i Manuel I. Diez 

Do. 



Guillermo V. Cintron. 
Antonio Garcia Sanjengo. 

Do. 
Tomas Boucher Bayron. 



Elenterio Pujalo Quifione 

Do. 
Ambrosio Marchani. 

Do. 



Isla Mona. 



ISLA MONA. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT ANASCO. 



J.J. Giminez. 



Cuarteles primero 

Cuarteles tercero '. Francisco Y. Montoyi 

6o | Cuarteles segundo .' ! Do. 

I Sil verio Aran. 



APPENDICES. 



377 



Enumeration districts and enumerators— Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OP MAYAGUEZ— Continued. 



Enumeration districts. 



No. 



39 



Designation. 



municipal district an asco— continued. 



Enumerators. 



45 



Cuarteles cuarto 

Afiasco arriba 

Aflasco abajo 

Caguabo 

Playa 

Hatillo 

Caracol 

Marias 

Quebrada Larga 

Pifiales 

Daguey 

Humatas 

Cerro-gordo 

Corcovado 

Espino 

Cidra 

Carreras ; ; | Fid ^ Benites 

Cercado 

Rio-ariba 

Casey-abajo 

Ovejas 

Casey arriba 



Silverio Aran. 
Oscar Porrata. 

Do. 
Magin Montoya. 

Do. 
Eduardo Ynfante. 

Do. 
Pablo Ybanez. 

Do. 
Manuel Betances. 
Antonio Charneco. 

Do. 
Emilio Goico. 

Do. 
Serafln Agostini. 

Do. 

Do. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT CABO ROJO. 



Pueblo Norte . 
Pueblo Sud . . . 

Bajura 

Monte Grande 

....do 

Guanajibo — 

Miradero 

do 

Pedernales — 

do...'. 

Boqueron 

Llanos Tuna . 



Do. 
Do. 
Rafael Mangual Lopez. 
Do. 



Lucas E. Muniz. 
Enrique Toro Soler. 
Luis Bran. 

Antonio Comas Ortiz. 
Jose Garrastasio. 
Juan B. Marti. 
Alfredo Toro Colberg. 
Tomas Marini Silva. 
Wenceslas Font. 
Sergio Toro Ortiz. 
Gil Bouget. 
Gregorio Montalvo. 
Manuel Toro Peralta. 



do ......... Elias Montalvo Colberg 



.do 



Llanos 



(»:::::::::::::::::::: :.:::.. Artur Lo P ez. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT SAN GERMAN. 



Pueblo central 

Pueblo oriental 

Pueblo occidental — 

Minillas 

Retiro 

Guama 

Sabana Grande abajo . 

Cotui 

Tuna 

Maresua 

Rosario bajo 

Hoconuco bajo 

Cain alto 

Hoconuco alto 

Cain bajo 

Rosario alto 

Duey bajo 

Sabana Eneas 

Ancones 

Rosario Penon 

Duey alto 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT LAJAS. 



Pueblo 

Paris 

Santa Rosa 

Plata 

Lajas arriba . . . 

Costa 

Parguera 

Sabana Yeguas. 

Palmare jo 

Llanos 

Candelaria 



Juan O'Neill. 
Eduardo Delgado. 
Salvador Agrait. 
Luis Limeris. 
Ramon Delgado. 
Pedro Y. Pajaro. 
Antonio Yrizarry. 
Rafael Pujals. 
Eduardo Quinones. 

Do. 
Carlos Muxo. 
Martin R. Paradis. 
Antonio Barca. 
Galo Rosado. 
Francisco Pujals. 
Augusto Aponte. 
Gabriel Veles. 
Gustavo Deljado. 

Do. 
Vicente Lopez. 

Do. 



Manuel Torregrosa. 
Juan Girona. 
Buenaventura Pagganadn. 

Do. 
Alfonso Quintana Cajas. 
Luis Biaggi. 

Do. 
Arturo Zapata. 
Acisclo Ronda. 

Do. 
Bartolome Yrizarry. 



378 EEPOET ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO EICO, 1899. 

Enumeration districts and enumerators— Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF MA YAGUEZ— Continued. 



Enumeration districts. 



No. 



Designation. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT SABANA GRANDE. 



Pueblo Norte 
Pueblo Sue! . . 
Machuchal . . 
Rincon 



Enumerators. 



Sefionta Blanca M. Malaret 
Hipolito Garcia Sejarro 
Enrique Falcon. 



Tabonuco . 

do. 

Rayo . . 
Susua . 
Torre.. 



Miguel Schetini. 
Manuel Serra Ortiz. 
Angel R. Falcon. 
Ramon Gutierrez. 
Do. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT MARICAO. 
Pueblo 

97 I Maricao afuera 

98 Montoso '".'.". 

99 Bucarabones 

100 Indiera alta " 

101 Indiera Frios 

102 Indiera baja \[ 



103 
104 
105 
106 
106 
107 
10S 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 



Enrique Cuebas Grappe. 
Fermin Bran. 
Mateo Vera. 
Francisco Beauchamps. 
Jose Garcia Navarro. 
Hipolito Cuebas. 
Pedro Cordeu. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT LAS MARIAS. 



Pueblo and Maravilla FmMt . v™„^ ^ , 

Ait^ng(campo) .:::::::::::::::::::::::; SM^ ™*"- 

xanm^ies::::;;;; Mft*SP l SF tara fc 

Furnias " .' """ Antonio Olivencia. 



Do. 

Ramon Freyre Burgos. 

Santiago Beauchamps. 

Pedro Vanderdvs. 

Epifanio B. Perez. 
Buenavista'.""^' 1011 ' " • Ernesto Vi*sepo Hernandez. 

Chamorro Jose Muxo Vazquez. 

Espino ■ Eul °J 10 Vicento. 



Rio Canas 
Palma Escrita 
Bucarabones . 

Cerrote 

Purisima Concepcion 



Do. 



DEPARTMENT OF PONCE. 



9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT PONCE. 

Barrio primero 

Barrio segundo 

do 

do '.'.'.'.'".'.'.'.'.'. 

Barrio tercero 

Barrio cuarto . . 

do ......'. 

Barrio quinto 

do 

....do ..;; 

Cantera 

....do " 



do 

do 

Playa 

do 

do 

Canas 

....do 

Portugues 

Tibes 

.-..do 

San Patricio . . 

San Anton 

Sabanetas 

Bueana-Vayas 

Capitanejo 

Magueyes 



Mrs. Ana Camps. 
Seiiorita Olivia Paoli. 
Sefionta Angela Ruiz Gandia 
Sefiorita Mercedes Arias 
Sefiorita Rogelia Chardon. 
Luis S. Vasquez. 
Bernardino Bocanegra 
Sefiorita Dolores A. Duran. 
Jose A. Boscana. 
Antonio Pasarell. 
Guillermo Atiles Santos 
Oriol Pasarell, 2d. 
Eduardo Neuman. 
Julio Yordan. 
Carlos Gensana. 
Manuel Yzquierdo. 
Ricardo Arias. 
Avelino Rodriguez. 
Mariano Y. Clavell. 
Luciano Rivera. 
Gregorio Rivera. 
Evaristo Velasquez. 
Ramon Rivera. 
Ysidoro Uriarte. 
Raimundo Uriarte. 
Pedro I. Massanet. 
Francisco Trigo. 



Guaraguaos '.'.'.'.'.'."'.'.'. i ose Teissoniere. 



do. 
Quebrada Limon. 

Maruefio 

Machueloabajo.. 

— do 

Coto-Laurel 



Jose. C. Ortiz. 
Julio Ruiz. 
Genaro Soler. 
Luis V. Quintano. 
Ramon Vando. 
Rafael San Millan. 
Manuel Paoli. 



< 



APPENDICES. 



379 



Enumeration districts and enumerators — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OP PONCE— Continued. 



Enumeration districts. 



Designation. 



Enumerators. 



municipal district ponce — continued. 



Coto-Laurel 

Machuelo arriba . 

Real 

Cerrillos 

Maraguez 

do 

Montes Llanos . . . 

Anon 

do 

Especial 



Cayetano Casals. 

Arturo Fornaris, 2d. 

Rafael Balaguer. 

Carlos Atiles. 

Julio Ranin. 

Francisco Rodriguez Batista. 

Gustavo Mas. 

Natalio Gonzalez. 

Jose R. Vendrell. 

Arturo Fornaris, 1st. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT ADJUNTAS. 



Martin Aparicio. 
Juan F. Quintana. 
Jose Cobian. 
Jose Delgado. 
Arturo Aparicio. 
Manuel Garrastegin. 
Regino Nieves. 



Pueblo 

Saltillo 

....do 

Pellejas 

do 

Capaes 

Portillo 

Guayabo Dulce ; Juan Garcia Berenjuer. 

Guilarte ; Ramon Llompart. 

Yahuecas I Americo Rodriguez. 

do I Francisco Santiago. 

Garzas ! Juan Aparicio. 

Limani j Pedro Castro Arias. 

Vega arriba j Jose Schwartzkopff. 

Tanama i Guillermo Carreras. 

Yayales j Antonio Medina. 

Juan Gonzalez and Portugues I Jose Gregorio Loba. 

Guayo and Vega abajo Francisco Yrizarry. 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT AIBONlTn. 



Norte and Sud 

Asomante and Caonillas . 

Algarrobo and Llano 

Cuyon 

I'astos and Roble 

Plata 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT RARKIIS. 



Pueblo , 

Ala de la Piedra and Orocovis . 

Botijas 

Gato 

t Saltos 

Sabana and Mata de can a 

Barros 

Pellejas and Bauta arriba 

Bermejales 

Bauta abajo 

Damian arriba 

Damian abajo 

Collores and Cacaos , 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT BARRANQUITAS. 



Pueblo 

Palo lincado 

Helechal 

Quebradillas 

Honduras 

Quebrada grande . 

Canabon 

Barrancas 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT COAMO. 



Errnita 

Este and Oeste 

Cuyon and Palmare jo 

Pasto 

San Ildefonso 

Llanos 

Santa Catalina 

Pedro Garcia 



Angel de la Cruz. 
Francisco Colon. 
Fausto Negron. 
Juan A. del Manzano. 
Manuel Martinez Aviles. 
Ramon A. Rodriguez. 



Emilio Santo Domingo. 
Eladio Rodriguez. 
Jose E. Zavala. 
Manuel Ramos. 
Clemente Valle. 
Francisco Carreras. 
Gervasio Colon. 
Juan M. Yglesia. 
Roman Carreras. 
Jose Rojas. 
Amadeo Barredo. 
Bautista Latorro. 
Lucas Colon. 



Sefiorita Angela Santaella. 
Julio F. Ortiz. 
Jose Munoz Rivera. 
Tomas Pagan. 
Jose M. Santini. 
Manuel Carvajal. 
Joaquin Rojas. 
Tomas Colon. 



Edelmiro Matos. 
Domingo Emanuelli. 
Euripides Rodriguez. 
Hermogenes Rodriguez. 
Jose Baerga. 
Juan R. Jusino. 
Rogaciano F. Fontanez. 
Marcos Blancos. 



380 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

Enumeration districts and mumerators—Coniiimed. 

DEPARTMENT OF PONCE— Continued. 



Enumeration districts. 



No. 



99 
100 

101 



102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 



Designation. 



municipal district coamo— continued. 



Enumerators. 



Cayales 

Coamo arriba 
Pulguillas 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT GUAYANILLA. 



Ill 
112 
113 
114 
115 

116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 



Pueblo 

Magas and Plava ...""" 

Indios and Boca 

Jagua and Concejo ..'...[ 

Llano and Quebradas. 
Barreroand Maeana.. 

Sierra "ha j a 

Quebrada-honda and Jagua-Pasto 
Pasto 



MUNICIPAL DISTRICT JUANA DIAZ. 



Jose E. Aponte. 
Manuel Marquez. 
Rosendo Quesada. 



Ramon Yordan. 
Alejandro Marguez. 
Antonio Yrizarry. 
Jose A. Pajaro. 
Joaquin Yordan. 
Pedro Romanacce. 
Rodolfo Pacheco. 
Joaquin P. Torres Lujo 
Rodolfo Pascual. 



135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 



117 
lis 
11'.) 
160 



Norte and Sur 

EsteandOeste Antonio Aracil. 

Lomas and Sabana Liana Dacio Pasarell. 

Guayabal. Jose Onol Mufloz. 

do Carlos Julia. 

Hato-Puerco abaio " Santiago Rodriguez. 

Villalba abajo Agapito Cortes. 

Hato-Puerco arriba Joaquin Torres. 

Villalba arriba Antonio Rivera. 

do PehpeColon. 

do. "" Serafin M. Natali. 

Caonilla arriba 0scar Mufloz. 

Caonilla abaio Vicente F. Rodriguez. 

Vacas " " " Mauricio de la Cruz. 

Jacaguas and Callado ' £ e ? r 9 G - Goico. 

Collores i Cefenno Rodriguez. 

do Manuel Ferrer. 

do. . . Rogerio Vasquez. 

Cintrona . . Lms Cruz. 

Capitanejo . EI °y Diaz - 

Armuelas . Manuel Y. Villaronja. 

Tijeras and Emajagual' ^ an c - Medrano. 

Rio Cafias arriba Manuel Rodriguez. 

Rio Cafias abaio Carlos Marin. 

I Reinaldo Alvarez. 

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT PENUELAS. 

Pueblo 

Cuevas and TallalxVi'saiiente JT N ' E u r ce11 - 

Tallaboa Poniente oclutmt; | Gabmo Balusguide. 

Tallaboa alta . . \ Rafael Soldevila. 

Encarnacion and'coto Pedro Lanusa. 

Jagua Ramon Perez. 



151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 



Rucio . . . 

do 

Quebrada Ceiba ."." 

Santo Domingo 

Maeana 

Barreal ..!...."... ', 

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT SANTA ISABEL. 

Pueblo and Playa.. 

Felicia No. 1 and Felicia No"2 

Jauca No. 1 and Jauca No. 2 

Boca, Velazquez, and Descalabrado ." '. '. [ '. [ .' ." ." .' .' ; 

MUNICIPAL DISTRICT YAUCO. 



Julio Gonzalez. 
Enrique Ginestre. 
Rafael Gonzalez. 
Jose Belen Gotay. 
Plises Ramirez. 
Romulo Purcell. 
Francisco Ferrer Banza. 



Marcelino Torres. 
Rosendo Arce. 
Rafael Vechini. 
Pedro Comas. 



Pueblo Norte 

do " Julio Arismendi. 

Pueblo Sud....".\" ' Santiago F. Negroni. 

Guanica j Jose Maria Mattel. 

do J Ramon C. Martin. 

Barinas ' Tomas Berastain. 

Jacana and Almaeigo alto | Jesus Beril. 

l.)8 i Insua alta and ( ic-,, IlcrnanVle/ ' £ am °n Pagan. 

159 I Insua baja ™ Qez Feodosio Nigaglioni. 

160 j Almaeigo bajo ... " " j Santiago Negroni Nigaa 

161 I Algarrobos ' ! Leopoldo Porrata. 

I Alejandro Agostini. 



lioni. 



APPENDICES. 381 

Enumeration districts and. enumerators — Continued. 
DEPARTMENT OF PONCE— Continued. 



Enumeration districts. 



No. 



162 
163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 



Designation. 



municipal district YAUCO— continued. 



Enumerators. 



Vegas and Caimito 

Collores 

Rancheras 

Rubias 

Frailes 

Naranjo 



Augusto Agostini. 
Hercilio Vasquez. 
Antonio Follinchi. 
Carlos M. Fraticelli. 
Angel Vargas. 
Jose Perez Pagan. 



RioPrieto Domingo Pietri Roman. 

Aguas Blancas ..... Francisco Lopez. 

Duev Salvador Sune. 

Quebradas' '.'".'.'. Luis Garcia Toro. 

Sierra alta 



Antonio Sanchez. 



APPENDIX IV. 

CONTRACT FOR TABULATING THE ENUMERATION OF POPULATION OF 
THE ISLANDS OF CUBA AND PORTO RICO. 

Whereas the Tabulating Machine Company, through its general manager, Herman 
Hollerith, has submitted an offer to the Director of the Census of Cuba and Porto 
Rico to tabulate the enumeration of the population of the said islands, and said 
Director has concluded to accept said proposition, 

It is hereby agreed by and between Colonel J. P. Sanger, Director of the Census of 
Cuba and Porto Rico, party of the first part, and the Tabulating Machine Company, 
a corporation of the State of New York, party of the second part, as follows: 

The party of the second part, in consideration of the payments to be made to it as 
hereinafter provided, agrees to tabulate by the Hollerith tabulating system, and 
under the direction of its general manager, the enumeration of the population of 
the islands of Cuba and Porto Rico from the schedules to be delivered to it by the 
party of the first part according to the twenty-two (22) tables heretofore submitted. 

The party of the first part hereby agrees to pay to the party of the second part for 
such tabulation the sum of three and one-half (3i) cents for each person, and one 
(1) cent for each building enumerated, as follows: 

Eight-tenths (0.8) of one cent per person on completion of the tabulation of 
tables 1 and 2. 

Three-tenths (0.3) of one cent per person on completion of the tabulation of 

tables 3 and 4. 

Three-tenths (0.3) of one cent per person on completion of the tabulation of 

tables 5 and 7. 

Forty-five hundredths (0.45) of one cent per person on completion of the tabula 
tion of tables 8, 9, and 10. 

Seventy-five hundredths (0.75) of one cent per person on completion of the tabu- 
lation of tables 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15. 

Nine-tenths (0.9) of one cent per person on completion of the tabulation of tables 
16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21. 

The payments for tabulating tables 1 and 2, and for tabulating tables 3 and 4, are 
to be made on the completion of such tables for each province of Cuba and depart- 
ment of Porto Rico, and for the remaining tables 5 to 22 inclusive, on completion of 
such tables for each island. 



382 REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

The party of the second part agrees to commence such tabulation without delay 
upon receipt of the schedules from the party of the first part, and to proceed with 
and complete said tabulation with diligence and dispatch. 

The party of the second part further agrees to tabulate the schedules relating to 
agriculture and schools for said islands according to such tables as may be required 
by the party of the first part, for which tabulations the party of the first part agrees 
to pay to the party of the second part, in addition to the payments above provided 
for, the actual cost of such tabulation (which shall include rent, clerk hire, mate- 
rial, and all other expenses) plus ten (10) per cent of such cost for the services of 
the party of the second part for superintending and directing the work. 

The party of the first part may at any time discontinue the tabulation of the 
schedules relating to agriculture and schools by giving written notice to that effect 
to the party of the second part; and in such event all records and results are to be 
delivered to the party of the first part, and the pai-ty of the second part shall be 
paid for the cost of the work plus said ten (10) per cent for services, to the date of 
the receipt of such notice by the party of the second part. 

In witness whereof the parties aforesaid have executed this agreement in quadru- 
plicate, and have hereunto set their hands and affixed their seals this 1st day of 
February, A. D. 1900. 

Signed by contracting parties and witnessed. 



APPENDIX V. 
GOVERNORS OF PORTO RICO. 

1. Juan Ponce de Leon, appointed by their Majesties on March 2, 1510, captain of 
the island, and turned over the command by royal order in 1511 to 

2. Juan Ceron and Miguel Diaz, appointed by Admiral Diego Columbus in the use 
of his rights, acknowledged by the Council of Indies. They governed until 1514, at 
which period the same admiral removed them and appointed 

3. Commander Moscoso, whose administration was very brief, resigning the 
authority in the same year to 

4. Cristobal de Mendoza, who led the expedition against the Indians of Vieques 
and left for Sevilla, being substituted in his turn by 

5. Juan Ponce de Leon, appointed for the second time, on September 27, 1514, 
captain of the island, with civil and criminal jurisdiction on both land and sea. He 
governed seven years, and as he was preparing, in 1520, for his second expedition to 
Florida, he intrusted the command to 

6. Antonio de la Gama, who, in September, 1519, had arrived at San Juan in the 
capacity of judge, and who married a daughter of Ponce de Leon. Gama retained 
the supreme authority until the beginning of 1521, in which year he transferred it, 
by order of the King, to Diego Columbus, who selected as his lieutenant 

7. Pedro Moreno, the municipal mayor, who had been the solicitor of the city, and 
who retained the command until 1529, in which year 

8. Antonio de la Gama, Ponce de Leon's son-in-law, was appointed in his place. 
His management could not have been very satisfactory, as he was removed in 1531, 
his successor being 

9. Lucas Vazquez de Ayllon, a justice of the audiencia of Santo Domingo, in order 
that, assuming the general authority, he might supervise the actions of Moreno as 



APPENDICES. 383 

well as of Gama. The latter left for Venezuela, and after his task was ended Ayllon 
returned to the Espanola, in the same year, the command being transferred to* 

10. Francisco Manuel de Lando, the ordinary municipal mayor, appointed, as 
Moreno had been, the lieutenant of the admiral. Lando discharged his duties until 
1537, in which year the Crown recovered the right to appoint the captains and jus- 
tices of San Juan. This news was very gladly received in the island, but as seven 
years elapsed without the right being exercised, the ordinary mayors continued 
exercising the government, to the great dissatisfaction of the residents, who com- 
plained in 1541 that they had no head. Finally, in 1544, His Majesty appointed as 
captain 

11. Geronimo Lebron, who arrived in Porto Rico in 1545, and died a natural 
death fifteen days after his taking possession of the office. He was substituted in 
the same year by 

12. Licentiate Cervantes de Loaysa, a justice who resided in the Espanola, and who 
was appointed on the petition of the residents of San Juan. His strict rule brought 
about such dissatisfaction that in 1547 the municipality requested the monarch that 
he should not be allowed to govern in perpetuity, because it would mean the ruin of 
the island. 

13. Luis de Vallejo governed from June, 1550, to April, 1554, being replaced by 

14. Licentiate Caraza, appointed in 1555, and who governed until 1561. He was 
succeeded by 

15. Antonio de la Llama Vallejo, who married Leonora Ponce, the daughter of 
the conqueror, and who governed to 1564. In this year the appointment of civil 
officials as governors of the island was discontinued and 

16. Francisco Bahamonde Lugo, a cavalry captain in Flanders, was appointed. 
He was obliged in person to lead an expedition against the invasion of savages, 
receiving an arrow in a muscle which endangered his life. His government ended 
in 1569, and he left for Spain. At the beginning of 1570 he was succeeded by 

17. Francisco de Solis, a native of Salamanca, appointed for four years at an annual 
salary of 775,000 maravedis. He was succeeded in 1575 by 

18. Francisco de Obando, who continued in office until 1580, being followed by 

19. Juan de Cespedes, who died the same year. The next governor arrived in the 
island in 1581. 

20. Juan Melgarejo, a native of Sevilla, whose duty it was to prepare a geographic 
description of the country. He transferred the government in 1583 to 

21. Diego Melendez, mentioned by Abbad, and who governed the island for eleven 
years, from 1583 to 1594. 

22. Pedro Xuarez, colonel, governed provisionally in 1593 and 1595. 

23. Alonso Mercado, in 1599, captain. 

24. Sancho Ochoa de Castro, in 1602. 

25. Gabriel de Rojas, in 1603. 

26. Felipe Beaumont y Navarra hi 1614. 

27. Juan de Vargas, in 1620. 

28. Juan de Haro, in 1625. 

29. Enrique Henriquez, in 1630. 

30. Inigo de la Mota, 1635. 

31. Agustin de Silva, in 165*6. 

32. Maestre de Campo Juan Perez de Guzman, in 1661. 

33. Maestre de Campo Geronimo de Velasco, in 1664. 

34. Maestre de Campo Gaspar de Arteaga, in 1670. Died on March 7, 1674. 

35. Maj. Diego de Robladillo, in 1674, temporary. 

36. Capt. Baltasar Figueroa, in 1674, temporary. 
37 Maestre de Campo Alonso Campo, in 1675. 



384 REPORT <>N THE CENSUS OF PORTO RICO, 1899. 

38. Maestre de Campo Juan Robles, in 1678. 

39. Maestre de Campo Gaspar de Andono, in 1683. 

40. Maestre de Campo Gaspar de Arredondo, in 1690 to 1695. 

41. Maj. Tomas Franco, to 1698. 

42. Maj. Antonio Robles, to 1699, temporary. 

43. Maestre de Campo Gaspar de Arredondo, in 1699. 

44. Maestre de Campo Gabriel Gutierrez de Rivas, in 1700. 

45. Maj. Diego Villaran, in 1703, temporary. 

46. Capt. Francisco Sanchez, in 1703, temporary. 

47. Capt. Pedro de Arroyo, to 1705. 

48. Maestre de Campo Juan Morla, temporary. 

49. Maj. Francisco Granados, to 1708. 

50. Col. Juan Rivera, to 1713. 

51. Jose Carreno, in 1716, temporary. 

52. Maj. Alonso Bertodano, in 1716. 

53. Maj. Francisco Granados, to 1720. 

54. Captain of Cavalry Jose Mendizabal, to 1724. 

55. Lieut. Col. Matias Abadia, to 1731. 

56. Maj. Domingo Nanglares, to 1743. 

57. Col. Juan Colomo, in 1743. 

58. Col. Agustin Pareja, to 1751. 

59. Lieut. Col. Matias Bravo, to 1755. 

60. Mateo de Guazo. 

61. Felipe Ramirez. 

62. Col. Marcos de Vergara, 1766. 

63. Lieut. Col. Jose Tentor, temporary. 

64. Col. Miguel de Muesas, to 1775. 

65. Brig. Gen. Jose Dufresne, to 1783. 

66. Brig. Gen. Juan Daban, to 1789. 

67. Brig. Gen. Miguel Ustariz, to 1792. 

68. Brig. Gen. Francisco Torralbo, to 1795. 

69. Camp Marshal Ramon de Castro, to 1804. 

70. Camp Marshal Toribio de Montes, to 1801). 

71. Camp Marshal Salvador Melendez, to 1820. 

72. Brig. Gen. Juan Vasco y Pascual, in 1820. 

73. Brig. Gen. Gonzalo Arostegui, to 1822. 

74. Col. Jose Navarro, in 1822, temporary. 

75. Lieut. Gen. Miguel de la Torre, Count of Torrepando, to 1837. 

76. Camp Marshal Francisco Moreda, in 1837. 

77. Camp Marshal Miguel Lopez Banos, to 1840. 

78. Lieut. Gen. Santiago Mendez Vigo, to 1844. 

79. Lieut. Gen. the Count of Mirasol, to 1847. 

80. Camp Marshal Juan Prim, Count of Reus, t<> 1848. 

81. Lieut. Gen. Juan de la Pezuela, to 1851. 

82. Camp Marshal the Marquis of Spain, to 1852, temporary. 

83. Lieut. Gen. Fernando de Norzagaray, to 1855. 

84. Lieut. Gen. Andres Garcia Camba, in 1855. 

85. Lieut. Gen. Jose Lemery, to 1857. 

86. Lieut. Gen. Fernando Cotoner, to 1860. 

87. Lieut. Gen. Rafael Echague, to 1862. 

88. Brig. Gen. Rafael Izquierdo, in 1862, temporary. 

89. Lieut. Gen. Felix Maria de Messina, to 1865. 

90. Lieut. Gen. Jose Maria Marchesi, in 1867. 



APPENDICES. 885 

91. Lieut. Gen. Julian Juan Pavia, in 1869. 

92. Jose Laureano Sanz, lieutenant-general, in 1870. 

93. Gabriel Baldrich, lieutenant-general, in 1872. 

94. Ramon Gomez Pulido, lieutenant-general, in 1872. 

95. Simon de la Torre, lieutenant-general, in 1872. 

96. J. Martinez Plower, lieutenant-general, in 1873. 

97. Rafael Prinio de Rivera, lieutenant-general, in 1873. 

98. Jose Laureano Sanz, lieutenant-general, in 1875. 

99. Segundo de la Portilla, lieutenant-general, in 1877. 

100. Manuel de la Serna, lieutenant-general, in 1878. 

101. Eulogio Despujols, lieutenant-general, in 1881. 

102. Segundo de la Portilla, lieutenant-general, in 1884. 

103. Miguel de la Vega Inclan, lieutenant-general, in 1884. 

104. Ramon Fajardo, lieutenant-general, in 1884. 

105. Luis Daban, lieutenant-general, in 1885. 

106. Romualdo Palacio, lieutenant-general, in 1887. 

107. Juan Contreras, temporary, camp marshal, in 1887. 

108. Pedro Ruiz Dana, lieutenant-general, in 1888. 

109. Jose Lasso Perez, lieutenant-general, in 1892. 

110. Antonio Daban, lieutenant-general, in 1893. 

111. Jose Gamir, lieutenant-general, in 1895. 

112. Manuel Delgado Zulueta, temporary, general of division, to February 15, 1896. 

113. Sabas Marin, lieutenant-general, to January 4, 1898. 

114. Ricardo Ortega, general of division, January 4, 1898, to January 11, 1898, 
temporary. 

115. Andres Gonzalez Munoz, lieutenant-general, January 11, 1898. (Died the 
same day). 

i 116. Ricardo Ortega, general of division, January 12, 1898, temporary, to Feb- 
ruary 2, 1898. 
*117. Manuel Macias y Casado, lieutenant-general, February 2, 1898, to October 16, 



118. Ricardo Ortega, general of division, temporary, from October 16, 1898, to the 
18th of the same month and year, on which day the general government of the island 
was turned over to Maj. Gen. John R. Brooke. 

119. Maj. Gen. John R. Brooke, Military Governor, October 18, 1898, to Decem- 
ber 6, 1898. 

120. Maj. Gen. Guy V. Henry, Military Governor, December 6, 1898, to May 9, 1899. 

121. Brig. Gen. George W. Davis, Military Governor, May 9, 1899, to May 1, 1900. 

122. Charles H. Allen, Civil Governor, inaugurated May 1, 1900. 

8490—00 25 



386 



REPORT ON THE CENSUS OF POETO RICO, 1899. 



APPENDIX VI. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

The following is a list of the books consulted in the preparation of the Report of 
the Census of the Island of Porto Rico: 



Title. 



Abad, J. R 

Abbad y Lasierra, Fr. Ifligo 

Acosta y Cal vo, Jose J 

Bedwell, C.J. (British consul to Porto 

Rico). 
Brau, Salvador 

Carroll, H. K 

Coclun, Augustin 

Coll y Toste, Dr. C. (civil secretary of 
Porto Rico). 

Contreras, J 

Cordoba, Pedro T. de 

Davis, Gen. George W 

Diaz Caneja, Ignacio 

Flinter, Col. Geo. D 

Hall.A.D 

Halstead, Murat 

Hamm, M. A 

Hill,R.T 

Irving 

Labra, Rafael M. de 

Miles, Maj. Gen. N. W 

Ministerio de Ultramar 

Ober, F. A 

Pezuela, N 

Rector 

Robinson, Albert Gardner 

Stahl, Dr. Agustin 

Tapia y Rivera, Pedro 

Valle, Jose G. del 

Vines, Benito 

War Department 



Puerto Rico en la Feria-Exposicion de Ponce en 1882. Ponce, 

1885. 
Historia de Puerto Rico. Ampliada por Don Jose J. Acosta. 

San Juan, 1866. 
Agricultura tropical. Puerto Rico, 1862. 
American State Papers. 
Account of the Aborigines of Porto Rico. 1879. 

Las clases jornaleras en Puerto Rico. San Juan, 1882. 

British State Papers. 

Report on the Island of Porto Rico. 

L'Espagne et l'esclavage. Paris, 1869. 

Resefia del Estato Social, Econ6mico e Industrial de la Isla 

de Puerto Rico, 1899. 
Guia oficial de Puerto Rico, 1897. 
Mamoria geografica, historica, etc., de Puerto Rico. San Juan, 

1831. 
Reports on Porto Rico. 

Reports on Military Telegraph Lines of Porto Eico. 
La cuestion ultramarina. Puerto Rico, 1885. 
Waterloo politico. Puerto Rico, 1891. 
Reformas de Maura. Puerto Rico, 1893. 
Porto Rico. 

Slavery in Porto Rico. 
Porto Rico. 

Our New Possession, etc. 
Porto Rico and the West Indies. 

Cuba, Porto Rico, and other islands of the West Indies. 
Life of Columbus. 
Columbus and his Companions. 

La Repiiblica y las libertades de Ultramar. Madrid, 1897. 
Report on Military Operations in Porto Rico 
Regimen del gobierno en Puerto Rico. Madrid, 1897. 
Porto Rico and its Resources. 
Cr6nica de las Antillas. Madrid, 1871. 
The Story of Beautiful Porto Rico. 
Porto Rico of To-Day. 

Los Indios Borinquenos. Puerto Rico, 1889. 
Biblioteca historica de Puerto Rico. 

Puerto Rico en la Exposicion de Chicago. Puerto Rico, 1895. 
Apuntes relativos a los huracanes en las Antillas. Habana 

1877. 
Military Notes on Porto Rico. 



APPENDICES. 



387 



APPENDIX VII. 

Census of Porto Rico in account ivith the Insular Treasury of Porto Rico. 



Dr. 

Sept. 1, 1899, original estimate and 
allotment $199,000.00 



Total 



199, 000. 00 



Cr. 

Expenditures as follows: 
Director — 
Stationery and other of- 
fice supplies $70.15 

Salary of clerk and mes- 
senger 315.00 

Traveling expenses to 
and through Porto 

Rico 96. 25 

$481. 40 

Assistant Director, salary 4, 160. 00 

7 supervisors, salaries 3, 245. 00 

911 enumerators, salaries 52, 870. 00 

Clerks, special agents, and mes- 
sengers of Assistant Director 

and supervisors 7, 620. 05 

Transportation of stores and per- 
sons 1, 149. 24 

Rent and incidental expenses of 

offices in Porto Rico 3, 893. 71 

Census property ' 653. 42 

Census stationery and printing . 1, 739. 89 

Tabulating 39, 444. 38 

Printing bulletins 663. 14 

Printing and illustrating Eng- 
lish edition of report, 6,500 

copies 6, 643. 75 

Printing and illustrating Span- 
ish edition of report, 4,000 cop- 
ies 5, 841. 11 

Translating report and bulletins 

into Spanish 712.17 

Indexing report 65. 00 

Foreign postage census reports . 180. 00 

Total expenditures 129, 362. 26 

Excess of allotment over ex- 
penditures 69, 637. 74 



Total 199,000.00 

1 All census property in Porto Rico was purchased through the supply division of the War Depart- 
ment. The census property and stationery in Porto Rico on hand at the close of the work, and val- 
ued at $1,143.20, were transferred to the insular authorities. 



INDEX. 



Page. 
Abad,J.R 386 

Abadia, Matias (Governor) 384 

Abbad, Fray Inigo 23, 24, 25, 26, 30, 141 

Abbad y Lasierra, Fr. Ifiigo 386 

Abercrombie, Lord Ralph 15 

Aborigines, characteristics and customs 23-30 

Acosta, Don Jose Julian 27 

Acoste y Calvo, Jose J -. 386 

Adjuntas, city, population 163 

Adjuntas district 156, 162, 166, 168, 171, 

173, 186, 192, 195, 245, 303-305, 338, 340, 342, 344, 347, 349, 351, 353, 379 

Age and citizenship 62-65 

conjugal condition 65-71, 200-239 

education 265-267 

literacy 245-265 

nativity 174-185, 200-239, 240-243, 245-265, 265-267, 306-325 

occupations 89, 90, 306-325, 328, 329 

race .... 89, 90, 174-185, 200-239, 240-243, 245-265, 265-267, 267-280, 306-325 

school attendance 77, 267-280 

sex 53-55, 

172-185, 200-239, 240-243, 245-265, 265-267, 267-280, 30